2014 show 88 feb 26

Daniels first show on The Corporation Nation. Clint & Daniel expatiate over the Christian remedy in law.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Daniels first show on The Corporation Nation and a must hear introduction to the subject of Christian remedy in law and;

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Romans 2:11 Wycliffe Bible Wyc
11 For acception of persons is not with God.

Deuteronomy 1:17 Wyc

No difference shall be in doom of persons; ye shall hear so a little man, that is, poor, as a great man, neither ye shall take heed to the person of any man, for it is the doom of God.
That if anything seemeth hard to you, tell ye that to me, and I shall hear it.

Acts 10:34 Wyc
And Peter opened his mouth, and said, In truth I have found, that God is no acceptor of persons;

James 2:9 Wyc
But if ye take persons, ye work sin, and be reproved of the law, as trespassers


secular adj.
c. 1300, “living in the world, not belonging to a religious order,” also “belonging to the state,” from Old French seculer (Modern French séculier), from Late Latin saecularis “worldly, secular, pertaining to a generation or age,” from Latin saecularis “of an age, occurring once in an age,” from saeculum “age, span of time, generation.”

According to Watkins, this is probably from PIE *sai-tlo-, with instrumental element *-tlo- + *sai- “to bind, tie” (see sinew), extended metaphorically to successive human generations as links in the chain of life. Another theory connects it with words for “seed,” from PIE root *se- “to sow” (see sow (v.), and compare Gothic mana-seþs “mankind, world,” literally “seed of men”).

Used in ecclesiastical writing like Greek aion “of this world” (see cosmos). It is source of French siècle. Ancient Roman ludi saeculares was a three-day, day-and-night celebration coming once in an “age” (120 years). In English, in reference to humanism and the exclusion of belief in God from matters of ethics and morality, from 1850s.

se
word-forming element, from Latin se-, collateral form of sed- “without, apart, aside, on one’s own,” related to sed, Latin reflexive pronoun (accusative and ablative), from PIE *sed-, extended form of root *s(w)e-, pronoun of the third person and reflexive (source also of German sich; see idiom).

ular
word-forming element, see -ule + -ar.

ule
word-forming element meaning “small, little” (in capsule, module, etc.), from French -ule, from Latin diminutive suffix -ulus (fem. -ula, neuter -ulum), from PIE *-(o)lo-, from *-lo-, secondary suffix forming diminutives, which also is the source of the first element in native diminutive suffix -ling.

yule, n.
2. Christmas and the festivities connected therewith. (Still the name in Sc. and north. dial.; since c1850 also a literary archaism in English). Freshly cut Log made kept burning for an extended length of time. Small pieces of old burned log ignite a new Yule log yearly.

ar
word-formation element meaning “pertaining to, of the nature of,” from Latin -arem, -aris “of the kind of, belonging to,” a secondary form of -alis, dissimilated form used after syllables with an -l- (such as insularis for *insulalis, stellaris for *stellalis).