2014 show 132 april 30

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Tonight’s topic among others: Daniel has problems calling in, intercourse and seduction; word of the day intercourse; and investigate every word and;


intercourse n. mid-15c., “communication to and fro,” (“In early use exclusively with reference to trade” [OED]), from Old French entrecors “exchange, commerce, communication” (12c., Modern French entrecours), from Late Latin intercursus “a running between, intervention,” in Medieval Latin “intercommunication,” from intercursus, past participle of intercurrere “to run between, intervene, mediate,” from Latin inter- “between” (see inter-) +currere “to run” (see current (adj.)).


seduction n. 1520s, from Middle French séduction, from Latin seductionem (nominative seductio), noun of action from past participle stem of seducere (see seduce). Originally with reference to actions or beliefs; sexual sense is from 1769, originally always with women as the objects. Earlier appearance of the word in Middle English with a sense “treason, treachery” probably is a confusion with sedition, which confusion also is found in Old French seducion “treason, betrayal.”


civil adj. late 14c., “relating to civil law or life; pertaining to the internal affairs of a state,” from Old French civil “civil, relating to civil law” (13c.) and directly from Latin civilis “relating to a citizen, relating to public life, befitting a citizen,” hence by extension “popular, affable, courteous;” alternative adjectival derivation of civis “townsman” (see city).


idiot n. early 14c., “person so mentally deficient as to be incapable of ordinary reasoning;” also in Middle English “simple man, uneducated person, layman” (late 14c.), from Old French idiote “uneducated or ignorant person” (12c.), from Latin idiota “ordinary person, layman; outsider,” in Late Latin “uneducated or ignorant person,” from Greek idiotes “layman, person lacking professional skill” (opposed to writer, soldier, skilled workman), literally “private person” (as opposed to one taking part in public affairs), used patronizingly for “ignorant person,” from idios “one’s own” (see idiom).


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plato’s_five_regimes#Timocracy

timocracy n. 1580s, from Middle French tymocracie, from Medieval Latin timocratia (13c.), from Greek timokratia, from time “honor, worth” (related to tiein “to place a value on, to honor,” from PIE *kwi-ma-, suffixed form of root *kweie- (1) “to value, honor”) + -kratia “rule” (see -cracy). In Plato’s philosophy, a form of government in which ambition for honor and glory motivates the rulers (as in Sparta). In Aristotle, a form of government in which political power is in direct proportion to property ownership. Related: Timocratic; timocratical.

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2014 show 127 april 23

Getting rid of the nickname. Government at War; and, Hey Man! lets talk about peace… and bad News

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Tonight’s topic among others: Getting rid of the nickname (Surname), Bundy standoff; occupation of land and; Government at War; and, Hey Man! lets talk about peace ……….. and bad News; and;


news n. late 14c., “new things,” plural of new (n.) “new thing,” from new (adj.); after French nouvelles, used in Bible translations to render Medieval Latin nova (neuter plural) “news,” literally “new things.” Sometimes still regarded as plural, 17c.-19c. Meaning “tidings” is early 15c. Meaning “radio or television program presenting current events” is from 1923. Bad news “unpleasant person or situation” is from 1926. Expression no news, good news can be traced to 1640s. Expression news to me is from 1889.


The Bench Of the Different Meaning of the Words Character
The Bench Of the Different Meaning of the Words Character. 1758 William Hogarth. Engraving

government n. late 14c., “act of governing or ruling;” 1550s, “system by which a thing is governed” (especially a state), from Old French governement “control, direction, administration” (Modern French gouvernement), from governer “to govern” (see govern). Meaning “governing power” in a given place is from 1702. Compare governance.

CIVIL DEATH, persons. The change of the state (q. v.) of a person who is declared civilly dead by judgment of a competent tribunal. In such case, the person against whom such sentence is pronounced is considered dead. 2 John. R. 218. See Gilb. Uses, 150; 2 Bulst. 188; Co. tit. 132; Jenk. Cent. 250; 1 Keble, 398; Prest. on Convey. 140. Vide Death, civil.

2014 show 124 april 18

pecial Friday Show with Daniel.. how Clint was wrong about the Bible and the answers therein and misery loves company

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Tonight’s topic among others: Special Friday Show with Daniel.. How to become Free, how Clint was wrong about the Bible and the answers therein and misery loves company and;


misery n. late 14c., “condition of external unhappiness,” from Old French misere “miserable situation, misfortune, distress” (12c.), from Latin miseria “wretchedness,” from miser (see miser). Meaning “condition of one in great sorrow or mental distress” is from 1530s. Meaning “bodily pain” is 1825, American English.

goya_satan
Saturn Devouring his Son. 1820-1823. Goya, Francisco. Oil on canvas | 1460 x 830 mm

cult n. 1610s, “worship,” also “a particular form of worship,” from French culte (17c.), from Latin cultus “care, labor; cultivation, culture; worship, reverence,” originally “tended, cultivated,” past participle of colere “to till” (see colony). Rare after 17c.; revived mid-19c. with reference to ancient or primitive rituals. Meaning “a devotion to a person or thing” is from 1829.

Cult. An organized group of people, religious or not, with whom you disagree. [Rawson]

2014 show 122 april 16

Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s

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Tonight’s topic among others: a question via email “giving up person-hood” and;


Mark 12:17 Wyc
17 And Jesus answered and said to them, Then yield ye to the emperor those things that be the emperor’s; and to God those things that be of God. And they wondered of him.
Mark 12:17 Kjv
17 And Jesus answering said unto them, Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s. And they marvelled at him.

Render_unto_Caesar wiki


The Tribute Money
The Tribute Money, 1640. Preti, Mattia. Oil on canvas, 1930 x 1430 mm.

person n.
early 13c., from Old French persone “human being, anyone, person” (12c., Modern French personne) and directly from Latin persona “human being, person, personage; a part in a drama, assumed character,” originally “mask, false face,” such as those of wood or clay worn by the actors in later Roman theater. OED offers the general 19c. explanation of persona as “related to” Latin personare “to sound through” (i.e. the mask as something spoken through and perhaps amplifying the voice), “but the long o makes a difficulty ….” Klein and Barnhart say it is possibly borrowed from Etruscan phersu “mask.” Klein goes on to say this is ultimately of Greek origin and compares Persephone.

Of corporate entities from mid-15c. The use of -person to replace -man in compounds and avoid alleged sexist connotations is first recorded 1971 (in chairperson). In person “by bodily presence” is from 1560s. Person-to-person first recorded 1919, originally of telephone calls.


render v.
late 14c., “repeat, say again,” from Old French rendre “give back, present, yield” (10c.), from Vulgar Latin *rendere (formed by dissimilation or on analogy of its antonym, prendre “to take”), from Latin reddere “give back, return, restore,” from red- “back” (see re-) + comb. form of dare “to give” (see date(n.1)).

Meaning “hand over,deliver” is recorded from late 14c.; “to return” (thanks, a verdict, etc.) is attested from late 15c.; meaning “represent, depict” is first attested 1590s. Irregular retention of -er in a French verb in English is perhaps to avoid confusion with native rend (v.) or by influence of a Middle English legalese noun render “a payment of rent,” from French noun use of the infinitive. Related: Rendered; rendering.

2014 show 117 april 09

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Tonight’s topic among others: Sprayed sky’s and;


Colossians 2 Wyc
13 And when ye were dead in your guilts, and in the prepuce of your flesh, he quickened together you with him; forgiving to you all guilts,
14 doing away that writing of decree that was against us, that was contrary to us; and he took away that from the middle, pitching it on the cross;
15 and he spoiled principats and powers, and led out trustily, openly overcoming them in himself.

Colossians 2 Kjv
13 And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses;
14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;
15 And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it.


transgress v.
late 15c., from Middle French transgresser (14c.), from Latin transgressus, past participle of transgredi “to step across, step over” (see transgression). Related: Transgressed; transgressing.


sin v.
Old English syngian “to commit sin, transgress, err,” from synn (see sin (n.)); the form influenced by the noun. Compare Old Saxon sundion, Old Frisian sendigia, Middle Dutch sondighen, Dutch zondigen, Old High German sunteon, German sündigen “to sin.” Form altered from Middle English sunigen by influence of the noun.

sin n.
Old English synn “moral wrongdoing, injury, mischief, enmity, feud, guilt, crime, offense against God, misdeed,” from Proto-Germanic *sun(d)jo- “sin” (cognates: Old Saxon sundia, Old Frisian sende, Middle Dutch sonde, Dutch zonde, German Sünde “sin, transgression, trespass, offense,” extended forms), probably ultimately “it is true,” i.e. “the sin is real” (compare Gothic sonjis, Old Norse sannr “true”), from PIE *snt-ya-, a collective form from *es-ont- “becoming,” present participle of root *es- “to be” (see is)…


corporation n.
mid-15c., “persons united in a body for some purpose,” from such use in Anglo-Latin, from Late Latin corporationem (nominative corporatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin corporare “to embody” (see corporate). Meaning “legally authorized entity” (including municipal governments and modern business companies) is from 1610s.

2014 show 112 april 02

Forgive to us our debts, as we forgive to our debtors and the Super Sonic Fraudsters for the Pagan Universal Church

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Tonight’s topic among others: Matthew 6 and the Super Sonic Fraudsters for the Pope and;


Matthew 6 Wyc
9 And thus ye shall pray, Our Father that art in heavens, hallowed be thy name;
10 thy kingdom come to; be thy will done in earth as it is in heaven;
11 give to us this day our each day’s bread;
2 and forgive to us our debts, as we forgive to our debtors;
13 and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.
24 No man may serve two lords, for either he shall hate the one, and love the other; either he shall sustain the one [or he shall sustain the one], and despise the other. Ye be not able to serve God and riches.


Jean Baudrillard – Simulacra and Simulation .pdf


bill n. ancient weapon, Old English bill “sword (especially one with a hooked blade), chopping tool,” common Germanic (compare Old Saxon bil “sword,” Middle Dutch bile, Dutch bijl, Old High German bihal, German Beil, Old Norse bilda “hatchet.”…
bill n.written statement,” mid-14c., from Anglo-French bille, Anglo-Latin billa “list,” from Medieval Latin bulla “decree, seal, sealed document,” in classical Latin “bubble, boss, stud, amulet for the neck” (hence “seal;” see bull (n.2)). Sense of “account, invoice” first recorded c. 1400; that of “order to pay” (technically bill of exchange) is from 1570s; that of “paper money” is from 1660s. Meaning “draft of an act of Parliament” is from 1510s.

be v. Old English beon, beom, bion “be, exist, come to be, become, happen,” from Proto-Germanic *biju- “I am, I will be.” This “b-root” is from PIE root *bheue- “to be, exist, grow, come into being,” and in addition to the words in English it yielded German present first and second person singular (bin, bist, from Old High German bim “I am,” bist “thou art”), Latin perfective tenses of esse (fui “I was,” etc.), Old Church Slavonic byti “be,” Greek phu- “become,” Old Irish bi’u “I am,” Lithuanian bu’ti “to be,” Russian byt’ “to be,” etc. It also is behind Sanskrit bhavah “becoming,” bhavati “becomes, happens,” bhumih “earth, world.”
ill adj. c. 1200, “wickedly; with hostility,” from ill (adj.). Meaning “not well, poorly” is from c. 1300. It generally has not shifted to the realm of physical sickess, as the adjective has done. Ill-fated recorded from 1710; ill-informed from 1824; ill-tempered from c. 1600; ill-starred from c. 1600. Generally contrasted with well, hence the useful, but now obsolete or obscure illcome (1570s), illfare (c. 1300), and illth.
ill adj. c. 1200, “morally evil; offensive, objectionable” (other 13c. senses were “malevolent, hurtful, unfortunate, difficult”), from Old Norse illr “evil, bad; hard, difficult; mean, stingy,” a word of unknown origin. Not considered to be related to evil. From mid-14c. as “marked by evil intentions; harmful, pernicious.” Sense of “sick, unhealthy, diseased, unwell” is first recorded mid-15c., probably from a use similar to that in the Old Norse idiom “it is bad to me.” Slang inverted sense of “very good, cool” is 1980s. As a noun, “something evil,” from mid-13c.
ill v. early 13c., “do evil to,” from ill (adj.). Meaning “speak disparagingly” is from 1520s. Related: Illed; illing.


synonym n. “word having the same sense as another,” early 15c. (but usually in plural form before 18c., or, if singular, as synonyma), from Old French synonyme (12c.) and directly from Late Latin synonymum, from Greek synonymon “word having the same sense as another,” noun use of neuter of synonymos “having the same name as, synonymous,” from syn- “together, same” (see syn-) + onyma, Aeolic dialectal form of onoma “name” (see name n.).


Luke 11:52 Kjv
52 Woe unto you, lawyers! for ye have taken away the key of knowledge: ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in ye hindered.

Luke 11:52 Wyc
52 Woe to you, wise men of the law, for ye have taken away the key of knowing; and ye yourselves entered not, and ye have forbidden them that entered.


James 5 Wyc
1 Do now, ye rich men, weep ye, yelling in your wretchednesses that shall come to you.
2 Your riches be rotten, and your clothes be eaten of moths.
3 Your gold and silver hath rusted, and the rust of them shall be to you into witnessing, and shall eat your fleshes, as fire. Ye have treasured to you wrath in the last days.
4 Lo! the hire of your workmen, that reaped your fields, which is defrauded of you [which is frauded of you], crieth; and the cry of them hath entered into the ears of the Lord of hosts.
5 Ye have eaten on the earth, and in your lecheries ye have nourished your hearts. In the day of slaying


Leviticus 6:4 Wyc
if it is convicted of the guilt, he shall yield whole all things which he would get by fraud, (if he is convicted, and found guilty, he shall give back whole everything which he hath gotten by fraud,)
Joshua 9:22
Joshua called (for the) Gibeonites, and said to them, Why would ye deceive us by fraud, (so) that ye said, We dwell full far from you, since ye be in the midst of us? (We live far away from you, when truly ye live right here in the midst of us?)
Judges 11:9
And Jephthah said to them, Whether ye came verily, or without fraud, to me, that I fight for you against the sons of Ammon, and if the Lord shall betake them into mine hands, shall I be your prince?
Proverbs 24:2
For the soul of them bethinketh (on) ravens, and their lips speak frauds.


impersonation n. 1800, “personification;” 1825 as “an acting of a part or character;” noun of action from impersonate v.


fee n. Middle English, representing the merger or mutual influence of two words, one from Old English, one from an Old French form of the same Germanic word, and both ultimately from a PIE root meaning “cattle.”

The Old English word is feoh “livestock, cattle; movable property; possessions in livestock, goods, or money; riches, treasure, wealth; money as a medium of exchange or payment,” from Proto-Germanic *fehu- (cognates: Old Saxon fehu, Old High German fihu, German Vieh “cattle,” Gothic faihu “money, fortune”). This is from PIE *peku- “cattle” (cognates: Sanskrit pasu, Lithuanian pekus “cattle;” Latin pecu “cattle,” pecunia “money, property”).

The other word is Anglo-French fee, from Old French fieu, a variant of fief “possession, holding, domain; feudal duties, payment” (see fief ), which apparently is a Germanic compound in which the first element is cognate with Old English feoh.

Via Anglo-French come the legal senses “estate in land or tenements held on condition of feudal homage; land, property, possession” (c. 1300). Hence fee-simple (late 14c.) “absolute ownership,” as opposed to fee-tail (early 15c.) “entailed ownership,” inheritance limited to some particular class of heirs (second element from Old French taillir “to cut, to limit”).

The feudal sense was extended from landholdings to inheritable offices of service to a feudal lord (late 14c.; in Anglo-French late 13c.), for example forester of fe “a forester by heritable right.” As these often were offices of profit, the word came to be used for “remuneration for service in office” (late 14c.), hence, “payment for (any kind of) work or services” (late 14c.). From late 14c. as “a sum paid for a privilege” (originally admission to a guild); early 15c. as “money payment or charge exacted for a license, etc.”


Colossians 2
13 And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses;
14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;
15 And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it.