2014 show 147 may 21

Bad converted into good greed gain title and the curse of language and the robber of time.

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Tonight’s topic among others: The path of the many, and bad converted into good and greed gain title property or land and;


Háckney n. hacnai, Welsh; hackeneye, Teuton. haquenée, French.
A pacing horse.
A hireling; a prostitute.
That is no more than every lover Does from his hackney lady suffer. Hudibras.
Any thing let out for hire. Much used; common.
These notions young students in physick derive from their hackney authors. Harvey on Consumptions.
mercenary adj.
1530s, from mercenary (n.), or in part from Latin mercenarius “hired, paid, serving for pay.”
mercenary n.
late 14c., “one who works only for hire,” from Old French mercenaire “mercenary, hireling” (13c.) and directly from Latin mercenarius “one who does anything for pay,” literally “hired, paid,” from merces (genitive mercedis) “pay, reward, wages,” from merx (see market n.).
hack adj.
“hired, mercenary,” 1812, from hack (n.2).
hireling n.
“one who works for hire,” Old English hyrling; see hire v. + –ling. Now only disparaging, “one who acts only for mercenary motives,” a sense that emerged late 16c. As an adjective by 1580s.
ling
diminutive word-forming element, early 14c., from Old English -ling a nominal suffix (not originally diminutive), from Proto-Germanic -linga-; attested in historical Germanic languages as a simple suffix, but probably representing a fusion of two suffixes: 1. that represented by English -el (1), as in thimble, handle; and 2. -ing, suffix indicating “person or thing of a specific kind or origin;” in masculine nouns also “son of” (as in farthing, atheling, Old English horing “adulterer, fornicator”), from PIE -(i)ko- (see -ic).

Both these suffixes had occasional diminutive force, but this was only slightly evident in Old English -ling and its equivalents in Germanic languages except Norse, where it commonly was used as a diminutive suffix, especially in words designating the young of animals (such as gæslingr “gosling”). Thus it is possible that the diminutive use that developed in Middle English is from Old Norse.


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fasces n.
1590s, from Latin fasces “bundle of rods containing an axe with the blade projecting” (plural of fascis “bundle” of wood, etc.), from Proto-Italic *faski- “bundle,” perhaps from PIE *bhasko- “band, bundle” (cognates: Middle Irish basc “neckband,” Welsh baich “load, burden,” perhaps also Old English bæst “inner bark of the linden tree”). Carried before a lictor, a superior Roman magistrate, as a symbol of power over life and limb: the sticks symbolized punishment by whipping, the axe-head execution by beheading. Hence in Latin it also meant, figuratively, “high office, supreme power.”


money n. mid-13c., “coinage, metal currency,” from Old French monoie “money, coin, currency; change” (Modern French monnaie), from Latin moneta “place for coining money, mint; coined money, money, coinage,” from Moneta, a title or surname of the Roman goddess Juno, in or near whose temple money was coined; perhaps from monere “advise, warn” (see monitor n., with the sense of “admonishing goddess,” which is sensible, but the etymology is difficult. Extended early 19c. to include paper money.

Matthew 6:24 Kjv
No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon
3126 mammonas mam-mo-nas’ of Chaldee origin (confidence, i.e. wealth, personified); mammonas, i.e. avarice (deified):–mammon.
Strong’s Greek Bible Dictionary

Nail n. (nœᵹl, Saxon; nagel, German.)
A spike of metal by which things are fastened together.
On the nail. Readily; immediately; without delay. I suppose from a counter studded with nails.

We want our money on the nail, The banker’s ruin’d if he pays. Swift’s Poems.

Matthew 26:15 Diaglott
14 Then going one of the twelve he being named Judas Iscariot, to the high-priests,
15 said: What are you willing to me to give, and I to you will deliver up him? They and paid to him thirty pieces of silver.
16 And from then he did seek opportunity, that him he might deliver up.

Colossians 2:14 Diaglott
13 and you, dead being in the faults and by the uncircumcision of the flesh of you, he made alive together with him, having freely forgiven us all the faults;
14 having blotted out that against us written by hand in the ordinances, which was contrary to us, and it he has removed out of the midst, having nailed it to the cross;
15 having stripped off the governments and the authorities, he made a show by publicity, having triumphed over them in it.

As Juno Moneta (“the Warner”), she had a temple on the Arx (the northern summit of the Capitoline Hill) from 344 bc; it later housed the Roman mint, and the words “mint” and “money” derive from the name.


patriotard adj.
patriotard m ‎(feminine singular patriotarde, masculine plural patriotards, feminine plural patriotardes)
Excessively nationalistic; flag-waving; chauvinistic.

patriot n.
1590s, “compatriot,” from Middle French patriote (15c.) and directly from Late Latin patriota “fellow-countryman” (6c.), from Greek patriotes “fellow countryman,” from patrios “of one’s fathers,” patris “fatherland,” from pater (genitive patros) “father” (see father (n.)); with -otes, suffix expressing state or condition. Liddell & Scott write that patriotes was “applied to barbarians who had only a common (patris), (politai) being used of Greeks who had a common (polis) (or free-state).”

Meaning “loyal and disinterested supporter of one’s country” is attested from c. 1600, but became an ironic term of ridicule or abuse from mid-18c. in England, so that Johnson, who at first defined it as “one whose ruling passion is the love of his country,” in his fourth edition added, “It is sometimes used for a factious disturber of the government.”

The name of patriot had become (c. 1744) a by-word of derision. Horace Walpole scarcely exaggerated when he said that …
the most popular declaration which a candidate could make on the hustings was that he had never been and never would be a patriot. (Macaulay, “Horace Walpole,” 1833)

Somewhat revived in reference to resistance movements in overrun countries in World War II, it has usually had a positive sense in American English, where the phony and rascally variety has been consigned to the word patrioteer (1928). Oriana Fallaci (“The Rage and the Pride,” 2002) marvels that Americans, so fond of patriotic, patriot, and patriotism, lack the root noun and are content to express the idea of patria by cumbersome compounds such as homeland. (Joyce, Shaw, and H.G. Wells all used patria as an English word early 20c., but it failed to stick.) Patriots’ Day (April 19, anniversary of the 1775 skirmishes at Lexington and Concord Bridge) was observed as a legal holiday in Maine and Massachusetts from 1894.


ad
word-forming element expressing direction toward or in addition to, from Latin ad “to, toward” in space or time; “with regard to, in relation to,” as a prefix, sometimes merely emphatic, from PIE ad- “to, near, at” (cognate with Old English æt; see at). Simplified to a- before sc-, sp- and st-; modified to ac- before many consonants and then re-spelled af-, ag-, al-, etc., in conformity with the following consonant (as in affection, aggression). In Old French, reduced to a- in all cases (an evolution already underway in Merovingian Latin), but written forms in French were refashioned after Latin in 14c. and English did likewise 15c. in words it had picked up from Old French. In many cases pronunciation followed the shift.
add v.
late 14c., “to join or unite (something to something else),” from Latin addere “add to, join, attach, place upon,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + -dere comb. form meaning “to put, place,” from dare “to give” (see date (n.1)). Meaning “to do sums, do addition” also is from late 14c. Related: Added; adding. To add up “make sense” is from 1942.
vie v.
1560s, “to bet, make a bet,” (literally “make a vie, the noun attested from 1530s in cards), especially in card-playing, “to wager the value of one’s hand against an opponent’s,” shortened form of Middle English envie “make a challenge,” from Old French envier “compete (against), provoke; invite, summon, subpoena;” in gambling, “put down a stake, up the bet;” from Latin invitare “to invite,” also “to summon, challenge” (see invitation). Sense of “to contend (with) in rivalry” in English is from 1560s; that of “to contend, compete, strive for superiority” is from c. 1600.
vice
word-forming element meaning “deputy, assistant, substitute,” also “instead of, in place of,” 15c., from Latin vice “in place of,” ablative of vicis “a change, a turn, interchange alternation” (see vicarious). In Middle English sometimes borrowed in Old French form vis-, vi-.
vice n.
“moral fault, wickedness,” c. 1300, from Old French vice “fault, failing, defect, irregularity, misdemeanor” (12c.), from Latin vitium “defect, offense, blemish, imperfection,” in both physical and moral senses (in Medieval Latin also vicium; source also of Italian vezzo “usage, entertainment”), from PIE wi-tio-, from root wei- (3) “vice, fault, guilt.”

    Horace and Aristotle have already spoken to us about the virtues of their forefathers and the vices of their own times, and through the centuries, authors have talked the same way. If all this were true, we would be bears today. [Montesquieu] 

Vice squad “special police unit targeting prostitution, narcotics, gambling, etc.,” is attested from 1905, American English. Vice anglais “fetish for corporal punishment,” literally “the English vice,” is attested from 1942, from French. In Old French, the seven deadly sins were les set vices.
vice n.
“tool for holding,” see vise.
vise n.
early 14c., “a winch, crane,” from Anglo-French vice, Old French vis, viz “screw,” from Latin vitis “vine, tendril of a vine,” literally “that which winds,” from root of viere “to bind, twist” (see withy). Also in Middle English, “device like a screw or winch for bending a crossbow or catapult; spiral staircase; the screw of a press; twisted tie for fastening a hood under the chin.” The modern meaning “clamping tool with two jaws closed by a screw” is first recorded c. 1500.


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I will believe that the white that I see is black if the hierarchical Church so defines it.”
– Ignatius of Loyola

Ignatius
masc. proper name, from Latin Ignatius, collateral form of Egnatius. St. Ignatius, bishop of Antioch, was one of the apostolic fathers, martyred under Trajan; a set of epistles was attributed to him. Ignatius Loyola (1491-1556) was the founder of the Jesuits. Related: Ignatian.
Society of Jesus – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

igneous adj. 1660s, “pertaining to or resembling fire,” from Latin igneus “of fire, fiery; on fire; burning hot,” figuratively “ardent, vehement,” from ignis “fire, a fire,” extended to “brightness, splendor, glow;” figuratively “rage, fury, passion,” from PIE root egni- “fire” (cognates: Sanskrit agnih “fire, sacrificial fire,” Old Church Slavonic ogni, Lithuanian ugnis “fire”). Geological meaning “produced by volcanic forces” is from 1791, originally in distinction from aqueous. Earlier in the sense “fiery” were ignean (1630s), ignic (1610s).

The Secret History of Jesuits (1975) – Edmond Paris

Jesuit
1540s, from Modern Latin Jesuita, member of the Society of Jesus, founded 1533 by Ignatius Loyola to combat Protestantism. Their enemies (in both Catholic and Protestant lands) accused them of belief that ends justify means, hence the sense “a dissembling person” (1630s), and jesuitical “deceitful” (1610s).

title v.
“to furnish with a title,” early 14c., from title n. Related: Titled; titling.
title n.
c. 1300, “inscription, heading,” from Old French title “title or chapter of a book; position; legal permit” (12c., Modern French titre, by dissimilation), and in part from Old English titul, both from Latin titulus “inscription, label, ticket, placard, heading; honorable appellation, title of honor,” of unknown origin. Meaning “name of a book, play, etc.” first recorded mid-14c. The sense of “name showing a person’s rank” in English is first attested 1580s. Sports championship sense attested from 1913 (originally in lawn tennis), hence titlist (1913).

T. As ao abbreviation, this letter usually stands for either ” Territory,” “Trinity,”
“term,” “tempore,” (in the t’i me Oft) or “title.”
Every person who was convicted or felony, short of murder and admitted to the benefit of clergy, was at one time marked with this letter upon the brawn of the thumb. The practice is abolished. 7 & 8 Geo. IV. c. 27.
Blacks law 1

tau (Τ τ) :
nineteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, from Hebrew taw, last letter of the Hebrew alphabet, literally “sign, mark.”
In ancient times, Tau was used as a symbol for life and/or resurrection, whereas the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, theta, was considered the symbol of death.
In Biblical times, the Taw was put on men to distinguish those who lamented sin, although newer versions of the Bible have replaced the ancient term “Taw” with “mark” (Ezekiel 9:4) or “signature” (Job 31:35).

The sign of the cross. The mark of Cain… The image of containment or suppression Letter Perfect p301. David Sacks. 2003 ISBN 0-7679-1173-3

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Nazi
1930, noun and adjective, from German Nazi, abbreviation of German pronunciation of Nationalsozialist (based on earlier German sozi, popular abbreviation of “socialist”), from Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei “National Socialist German Workers’ Party,” led by Hitler from 1920.

The 24th edition of Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache (2002) says the word Nazi was favored in southern Germany (supposedly from c. 1924) among opponents of National Socialism because the nickname Nazi, Naczi (from the masc. proper name Ignatz, German form of Ignatius) was used colloquially to mean “a foolish person, clumsy or awkward person.” Ignatz was a popular name in Catholic Austria, and according to one source in World War I Nazi was a generic name in the German Empire for the soldiers of Austria-Hungary.


v450_20090002_Law_Society_arms


signature analysis

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signature n.
1530s, a kind of document in Scottish law, from Middle French signature (16c.) or directly from Medieval Latin signatura “signature, a rescript,” in classical Latin “the matrix of a seal,” from signatus, past participle of signare “to mark with a stamp, sign” (see sign n.).
Meaning “one’s own name written in one’s own hand” is from 1570s, replacing sign-manual (early 15c.) in this sense. Musical sense of “signs placed it the beginning of a staff to indicate the key and rhythm” is from 1806. Meaning “a distinguishing mark of any kind” is from 1620s

sig Strong’s No.:H7873 pursuing
Transliteration: ώîyg
Pronunciation: seeg
Definition: From H7734; a withdrawl (into a private place): – pursuing.
Occurences: pursuing (1)


muster n.
late 14c., “action of showing, manifestation,” from Old French mostre “illustration, proof; examination, inspection” (13c., Modern French montre), literally “that which is shown,” from mostrer (see muster (v.)). Meaning “act of gathering troops” is from c. 1400. To pass musters (1570s) originally meant “to undergo military review without censure.”
muster v.
c. 1300, “to display, reveal, appear,” from Old French mostrer “appear, show, reveal,” also in a military sense (10c., Modern French montrer), from Latin monstrare “to show,” from monstrumomen, sign” (see monster). Meaning “to collect, assemble” is early 15c.; figurative use (of qualities, etc.) is from 1580s. To muster out “gather to be discharged from military service” is 1834, American English. To muster up in the figurative and transferred sense of “gather, summon, marshal” is from 1620s. Related: Mustered; mustering.
mon n. Slang Money
ster
Old English -istre, from Proto-Germanic -istrijon, feminine agent suffix used as the equivalent of masculine -ere (see -er (1)). Also used in Middle English to form nouns of action (meaning “a person who …”) without regard for gender.
stir n.
“commotion, disturbance, tumult,” late 14c. (in phrase on steir), probably from a Scandinavian source, such as Old Norse styrr “disturbance, tumult,” from the same root as stir (v.)). The sense of “movement, bustle” (1560s) probably is from the English verb.
stir v.
Old English styrian “to stir, move; rouse, agitate, incite, urge” (transitive and intransitive), from Proto-Germanic sturjan (cognates: Middle Dutch stoeren, Dutch storen “to disturb,” Old High German storan “to scatter, destroy,” German stören “to disturb”), from PIE (s)twer- (1) “to turn, whirl” (see storm (n.)). Related: Stirred; stirring. Stir-fry (v.) is attested from 1959.


human adj. n.human, 17 yuman (nonstandard).
Chiefly fig. Designating a person who takes on the appearance or form, or who performs the function of a specified (esp. inanimate) thing; (also) designating a person who assumes the appearance, role, or abilities of a specified creature.
human adj.
mid-15c., humain, humaigne, “human,” from Old French humain, umain (adj.) “of or belonging to man” (12c.), from Latin humanus “of man, human,” also “humane, philanthropic, kind, gentle, polite; learned, refined, civilized.” This is in part from PIE (dh)ghomon-, literally “earthling, earthly being,” as opposed to the gods (see homunculus). Compare Hebrew adam “man,” from adamah “ground.” Cognate with Old Lithuanian zmuo (accusative zmuni) “man, male person.”
Human interest is from 1824. Human rights attested by 1680s; human being by 1690s. Human relations is from 1916; human resources attested by 1907, American English, apparently originally among social Christians and based on natural resources.
Monster
A prodigious birth; a human birth or offspring not having the shape of mankind, which cannot be heir to any land, albeit it be brought forth in marriage. Bract fol. 5; Co. Litt. 7, 8; 2 Bl. Comm. 246


spelling n.
mid-15c., “action of reading letter by letter,” verbal noun from spell v.. Meaning “manner of forming words with letters” is from 1660s; meaning “a way a word has been spelled” is from 1731. Spelling bee is from 1878 (see bee; earlier spelling match, 1845; the act of winning such a schoolroom contest is described 1854 as to spell (someone) down).
spell v.
early 14c., “read letter by letter, write or say the letters of;” c. 1400, “form words by means of letters,” apparently a French word that merged with or displaced a native Old English one; both are from the same Germanic root, but the French word had evolved a different sense. The native word is Old English spellian “to tell, speak, discourse, talk,” from Proto-Germanic spellam (cognates: Old High German spellon “to tell,” Old Norse spjalla, Gothic spillon “to talk, tell”), from PIE spel- (2) “to say aloud, recite.”

But the current senses seem to come from Anglo-French espeller, Old French espelir “mean, signify, explain, interpret,” also “spell out letters, pronounce, recite,” from Frankish spellon “to tell” or some other Germanic source, ultimately identical with the native word.

Related: Spelled; spelling. In early Middle English still “to speak, preach, talk, tell,” hence such expressions as hear spell “hear (something) told or talked about,” spell the wind “talk in vain” (both 15c.). Meaning “form words with proper letters” is from 1580s. Spell out “explain step-by-step” is first recorded 1940, American English. Shakespeare has spell (someone) backwards “reverse the character of, explain in a contrary sense, portray with determined negativity.”
spell v.
work in place of (another),” 1590s, earlier spele, from Old English spelian “to take the place of, be substitute for, represent,” related to gespelia “substitute,” of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to spilian “to play” (see spiel). Related: Spelled; spelling.


curse n.
late Old English curs “a prayer that evil or harm befall one,” of uncertain origin, perhaps from Old French curuz “anger,” or Latin cursus “course.” Connection with cross is unlikely. No similar word exists in Germanic, Romance, or Celtic. Curses as a histrionic exclamation is from 1885. The curse “menstruation” is from 1930. Curse of Scotland, the 9 of diamonds in cards, is attested from 1791, but the origin is obscure.


Sacramentum (oath) – Military Wiki – Wikia

2014 show 146 may 20

Having a Baby? Give your hilding the Mark of the Beast, it’s the gift that keeps on giving.. Did I say giving? I meant taking.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Having a Baby? Here’s a Roundtable on how to keep your child from inheriting the Mark of the Beast. You have a Choice! A Free Child, or a Corporate Citizen with a phony name, with loads of Debt! Clint’s Guests Tonight: Freeman Burt, http://www.onlyfreemen.com/ and; pleading the baby act is a slang term used to refer to the act of asserting a person’s infancy as a defense to a contract claim. This plea of infancy is raised to defeat an action upon a contract made when the person was a minor. It is also at times applied to a plea of the statute of Limitations.


debt n. late 13c., dette, from Old French dete, from Latin debitum “thing owed,” neuter past participle of debere “to owe,” originally, “keep something away from someone,” from de- “away” (see de-) + habere “to have” (see habit (n.)). Restored spelling after c. 1400. In Middle English, debt of the body (mid-14c.) was “that which spouses owe to each other, sexual intercourse.”debtor (n.) early 13c., dettur, dettour, from Old French detour, from Latin debitor “a debter,” from past participle stem of debere; see debt. The -b- was restored in later French, and in English c. 1560-c. 1660. The KJV has detter three times, debter three times, debtor twice and debtour once.

fraud n. mid-14c., “criminal deception” (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin); from Old French fraude “deception, fraud” (13c.), from Latin fraudem (nominative fraus) “a cheating, deceit,” of persons “a cheater, deceiver.” Not in Watkins; perhaps ultimately from PIE *dhreugh- “to deceive” (cognates: Sanskrit dhruti- “deception; error”). Meaning “a fraudulent production, something intended to deceive” is from 1650s. The meaning “impostor, deceiver, pretender; humbug” is attested from 1850. Pious fraud (1560s) is properly “deception practiced for the sake of what is deemed a good purpose;” colloquially used as “person who talks piously but is not pious at heart.”

2014 show 142 may 14

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Tonight’s topic among others: NYC plans to vaccinate 98.8 % of all Schoolchildren. School Principals will be charged $2,000.00 for ever child not Vaccinated Under the 98.8% Level and http://billiontoddlermarchforsurvival.blogspot.no and Lawyers (The Devils own) are called to the Bar to represent lairs and;


believe v. Old English belyfan “to believe,” earlier geleafa (Mercian), gelefa (Northumbrian), gelyfan (West Saxon) “believe,” from Proto-Germanic *ga-laubjan “to believe,” perhaps literally “hold dear, love” (cognates: Old Saxon gilobian “believe,” Dutch geloven, Old High German gilouben, German glauben), ultimately a compound based on PIE *leubh- “to care, desire, love” (see belief).


country n. mid-13c., “district, native land,” from Old French contree, from Vulgar Latin *(terra) contrata “(land) lying opposite,” or “(land) spread before one,” from Latin contra “opposite, against” (see contra-). Sense narrowed 1520s to rural areas, as opposed to cities. Replaced Old English land. As an adjective from late 14c. First record of country-and-western music style is from 1942. Country club first recorded 1886. Country mile “a long way” is from 1915, American English.


vaccination n. 1800, used by British physician Edward Jenner (1749-1823) for the technique he devised of preventing smallpox by injecting people with the cowpox virus (variolae vaccinae), from vaccine (adj.) “pertaining to cows, from cows” (1798), from Latin vaccinus “from cows,” from vacca “cow” (Latin bos “cow” being originally “ox,” “a loan word from a rural dialect” according to Buck, who cites Umbrian bue). “The use of the term for diseases other than smallpox is due to Pasteur” [OED].

2014 show 137 may 07

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Tonight’s topic among others: Whats in the Bible, Is it all a warning? and Activist post Robot Bees and Man created nothing, and;


revelation n. c. 1300, “disclosure of information to man by a divine or supernatural agency,” from Old French revelacion and directly from Latin revelationem (nominative revelatio), noun of action from past participle stem of revelare “unveil, uncover, lay bare” (see reveal). General meaning “disclosure of facts” is attested from late 14c.; meaning “striking disclosure” is from 1862. As the name of the last book of the New Testament (Revelation of St. John), it is first attested late 14c. (see apocalypse); as simply Revelations, it is first recorded 1690s.
**tribulation (n.)
c. 1200, from Old French tribulacion (12c.), from Church Latin tribulationem (nominative tribulatio) “distress, trouble, affliction,” noun of action from past participle stem of tribulare “to oppress, afflict,” a figurative use by Christian writers of Latin tribulare “to press,” also possibly “to thresh out grain,” from tribulum “threshing sledge,” from stem of terere “to rub” (see throw (v.)) + -bulum, suffix forming names of tools.

Genesis 2 Wyc

2 Therefore heavens and earth be made perfect, and all the ornament of those.

2 And God [ful]filled in the seventh day his work which he made; and he rested in the seventh day from all his work which he had made;

3 and he blessed the seventh day, and hallowed it; for in that day God ceased of all his work which he made of nought, that he should make.

The Trouble with Tribbles ( the 44th episode of Star Trek )


suicide n. “deliberate killing of oneself,” 1650s, from Modern Latin suicidium “suicide,” from Latin sui “of oneself” (genitive of se “self”), from PIE *s(u)w-o- “one’s own,” from root *s(w)e- (see idiom) + -cidium “a killing” (see -cide). Probably an English coinage; much maligned by Latin purists because it “may as well seem to participate of sus, a sow, as of the pronoun sui” [Phillips]. The meaning “person who kills himself deliberately” is from 1728. In Anglo-Latin, the term for “one who commits suicide” was felo-de-se, literally “one guilty concerning himself.”

Even in 1749, in the full blaze of the philosophic movement, we find a suicide named Portier dragged through the streets of Paris with his face to the ground, hung from a gallows by his feet, and then thrown into the sewers; and the laws were not abrogated till the Revolution, which, having founded so many other forms of freedom, accorded the liberty of death. [W.E.H. Lecky, “History of European Morals,” 1869]

In England, suicides were legally criminal if of age and sane, but not if judged to have been mentally deranged. The criminal ones were mutilated by stake and given degrading burial in highways until 1823. Suicide blonde (one who has “dyed by her own hand”) first attested 1921. Baseball suicide squeeze is attested from 1937.