2014 show 146 may 20

Having a Baby? Give your hilding the Mark of the Beast, it’s the gift that keeps on giving.. Did I say giving? I meant taking.

Advertisements

Directly download mp3


Tonight’s topic among others: Having a Baby? Here’s a Roundtable on how to keep your child from inheriting the Mark of the Beast. You have a Choice! A Free Child, or a Corporate Citizen with a phony name, with loads of Debt! Clint’s Guests Tonight: Freeman Burt, http://www.onlyfreemen.com/ and; pleading the baby act is a slang term used to refer to the act of asserting a person’s infancy as a defense to a contract claim. This plea of infancy is raised to defeat an action upon a contract made when the person was a minor. It is also at times applied to a plea of the statute of Limitations.


debt n. late 13c., dette, from Old French dete, from Latin debitum “thing owed,” neuter past participle of debere “to owe,” originally, “keep something away from someone,” from de- “away” (see de-) + habere “to have” (see habit (n.)). Restored spelling after c. 1400. In Middle English, debt of the body (mid-14c.) was “that which spouses owe to each other, sexual intercourse.”debtor (n.) early 13c., dettur, dettour, from Old French detour, from Latin debitor “a debter,” from past participle stem of debere; see debt. The -b- was restored in later French, and in English c. 1560-c. 1660. The KJV has detter three times, debter three times, debtor twice and debtour once.

fraud n. mid-14c., “criminal deception” (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin); from Old French fraude “deception, fraud” (13c.), from Latin fraudem (nominative fraus) “a cheating, deceit,” of persons “a cheater, deceiver.” Not in Watkins; perhaps ultimately from PIE *dhreugh- “to deceive” (cognates: Sanskrit dhruti- “deception; error”). Meaning “a fraudulent production, something intended to deceive” is from 1650s. The meaning “impostor, deceiver, pretender; humbug” is attested from 1850. Pious fraud (1560s) is properly “deception practiced for the sake of what is deemed a good purpose;” colloquially used as “person who talks piously but is not pious at heart.”

Author: dsfadsfgafgf

Twice Internationally Recognized As A Leading Internationally Recognized Expert In dsfadsfgafgf

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s