2014 show 197 aug 20

Due to technical problems Daniel wasn’t able to appear, but Clint covered “this monetary thing” on his own.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Due to technical problems Daniel wasn’t able to appear, but Clint covered “this monetary thing” on his own. Daniel is heard briefly also fixing some water issue in the background and the Secular and Spiritual Side of Money and Clint takes calls and;

confidence (n.) early 15c., from Middle French confidence or directly from Latin confidentia, from confidentem (nominative confidens) “firmly trusting, bold,” present participle of confidere “to have full trust or reliance,” from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + fidere “to trust” (see faith). For sense of “swindle” see con (adj.).

money (n.) mid-13c., “coinage, metal currency,” from Old French monoie “money, coin, currency; change” (Modern French monnaie), from Latin moneta “place for coining money, mint; coined money, money, coinage,” from Moneta, a title or surname of the Roman goddess Juno, in or near whose temple money was coined; perhaps from monere “advise, warn” (see monitor (n.)), with the sense of “admonishing goddess,” which is sensible, but the etymology is difficult. Extended early 19c. to include paper money.

fiat (n.) 1630s, “authoritative sanction,” from Latin fiat “let it be done” (used in the opening of Medieval Latin proclamations and commands), third person singular present subjunctive of fieri “be done, become, come into existence,” used as passive of facere “to make, do” (see factitious). Meaning “a decree, command, order” is from 1750. In English the word also sometimes is a reference to fiat lux “let there be light” in Gen. i:3.

Dixitque Deus: Fiat lux. Et facta est lux. [Vulgate]

hypothecate (v.) 1680s, “pledge (something) without giving up control of it; pawn; mortgage,” from hypothecat-, past participle stem of Medieval Latin hypothecare, from Late Latin hypotheca “a pledge,” from Greek hypotheke “a deposit, pledge, mortgage,” from hypo- “beneath, under” (see hypo-) + tithenai “to put, place” (see theme). Related: Hypothecated; hypothecating; hypothecation; hypothecary.

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