2014 show 215 sept 17

The Borg are a collection of species that have been turned into cybernetic organisms functioning as drones in a hive mind called “The Collective”.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Were gonna get into some serious bible study today and tackle the Book of Proverbs and

“The Book of Proverbs is about godly wisdom, how to get it and how to use it. It’s about priorities and principles, not get-rich-quick schemes or success formulas. It tells you, not how to make a living, but how to be skillful in the lost art of making a life.” Warren W. Wiersbe, Be Skillful, p. 7.
Notes on Proverbs 2015 Edition The proverbs of Solomon the son of David, king of Israel; To know wisdom and instruction; to perceive the words of understanding; To receive the instruction of wisdom, justice, and judgment, and equity; …


proverb (n.) c. 1300, in boke of Prouerbyys, the Old Testament work, from Old French proverbe (12c.) and directly from Latin proverbium “a common saying, old adage, maxim,” literally “words put forward,” from pro- “forth” (see pro-) + verbum “word” (see verb). Used generally from late 14c. The Book of Proverbs in Old English was cwidboc, from cwide “speech, saying, proverb, homily,” related to cwiddian “to talk, speak, say, discuss;” cwiddung “speech, saying, report.”
word-forming element meaning “forward, forth, toward the front” (as in proclaim, proceed); “beforehand, in advance” (prohibit, provide); “taking care of” (procure); “in place of, on behalf of” (proconsul, pronoun); from Latin pro “on behalf of, in place of, before, for, in exchange for, just as,” which also was used as a prefix.

Also in some cases from cognate Greek pro “before, in front of, sooner,” which also was used in Greek as a prefix (as in pr o blem). Both the Latin and Greek words are from PIE *pro- (cognates: Sanskrit pra- “before, forward, forth;” Gothic faura “before,” Old English fore “before, for, on account of,” fram “forward, from;” Old Irish roar “enough”), extended form of root *per- (1) “forward, through” (see per).

The common modern sense “in favor of, favoring” (pro-independence, pro-fluoridation, pro-Soviet, etc.) was not in classical Latin and is attested in English from early 19c.

verb (n.) late 14c., from Old French verbe “word; word of God; saying; part of speech that expresses action or being” (12c.) and directly from Latin verbum “verb,” originally “a word,” from PIE root *were- (3) “to speak” (cognates: Avestan urvata- “command;” Sanskrit vrata- “command, vow;” Greek rhetor “public speaker,” rhetra “agreement, covenant,” eirein “to speak, say;” Hittite weriga- “call, summon;” Lithuanian vardas “name;” Gothic waurd, Old English word “word”).


BORG : In Saxon law. A pledge, pledge giver, or surety. The name given among the Saxons to the head of each family composing a tithing or decen­nary, each being the pledge for the good conduct of the others. Also the contract or engagement of suretyship ; and the pledge given.
BORGBRICHE :
A breach or violation of surety­ ship, or of mutual fidelity. Jacob.
BORGESMON :
In Saxon law. The name given to the head of each family composing a tithing.

Blacks law fourth edition : B

borg : Same as borgh.
borgh. 1. See BORG. 2. See BORROW. (Blacks 9th)
borrow, n. A frankpledge. Also spelled borgh; borh.
See DECENARY; FRANKPLEDGE

decenary. [fro Latin decena “a tithing”] Hist. A town
or district consisting of ten freeholding families. – A freeholder of the decenary (a decennarius) was bound by frankpledge to produce any wrongdoer living in the decenary. – Also spelled (incorrectly) decennary. ­
Also termed decmna; tithing. Cf. FRANKPLEDGE.
“The civil division of the territory of England is into counties, of those counties into hundreds, of those hundreds into tithings or towns. Which division, as it now stands, seems to owe its original to king Alfred; who, to prevent the rapines (plunder) and disorders which formerly prevailed in the realm, instituted tithings; so called from the Saxon, because ten freeholders, with their families, composed one.
These all dwelt together, and were sureties or free pledges to the king for the good behavior of each other; and, if any offence was committed in their district, they were bound to have the offender forthcoming. And there­ fore anciently no man was suffered to abide in England above forty days, unless he were enrolled in some tithing or decennary.” 1 William Blackstone, Commentaries on the
Laws of England 110 (1765).


Are we Prisoners of War?

Conflicts not of an international character
Geneva, 12 August 1949 Conventions and Additional Protocols, and their Commentaries

In the case of armed conflict not of an international character occurring in the territory of one of the High Contracting Parties, each Party to the conflict shall be bound to apply, as a minimum, the following provisions:
(1) Persons taking no active part in the hostilities, including members of armed forces who have laid down their arms and those placed ‘ hors de combat ‘ (outside the fight) by sickness, wounds, detention, or any other cause, shall in all circumstances be treated humanely, without any adverse distinction founded on race, colour, religion or faith, sex, birth or wealth, or any other similar criteria.
To this end, the following acts are and shall remain prohibited at any time and in any place whatsoever with respect to the above-mentioned persons:

demobilize ~ verb rare
1. release from military service or remove from the active list of military service
2. retire from military service


Superfluity
SUPERFLU’ITY, noun [Latin superfluitas; super and fluo, to flow.]
1. Superabundance; a greater quantity than is wanted; as a superfluity of water or provisions.

  1. Something that is beyond what is wanted; something rendered unnecessary by its abundance. Among the superfluities of life we seldom number the abundance of money.

money (n.) mid-13c., “coinage, metal currency,” from Old French monoie “money, coin, currency; change” (Modern French monnaie), from Latin moneta “place for coining money, mint; coined money, money, coinage,” from Moneta, a title or surname of the Roman goddess Juno, in or near whose temple money was coined; perhaps from monere “advise, warn” (see monitor (n.)), with the sense of “admonishing goddess,” which is sensible, but the etymology is difficult. Extended early 19c. to include paper money.

The Juno awards
As Juno Moneta (“the Warner”), she had a temple on the Arx (the northern summit of the Capitoline Hill) from 344 bc; it later housed the Roman mint, and the words “mint” and “money” derive from the name.

  1. Military. the code name for a beach on France’s Normandy coast, attacked by Canadian forces as part of the Allies’ D-day invasion on June 6, 1944. – Juno Beach is the second of the three invasion sectors of the Commonwealth forces. Here land the Canadians

Temple of Juno Moneta


Other historical references to the term Juno MONETA

A time of Richard I. Stim. Law Gloss. http://thelawdictionary.org/moneta

Henry II, King of England: The Saladin Tithe, 1188


Mammon (n.)**
“personification of wealth,” mid-14c., from Late Latin mammona, from Greek mamonas, from Aramaic mamona, mamon “riches, gain;” left untranslated in Greek New Testament (e.g. Matt. vi:24, Luke xvi:9-13) retained in the Vulgate, and regarded mistakenly by medieval Christians as the name of a demon.

2014 show 211 sept 10

“Welcome to the show Canada”

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Tonight’s topic among others: “Welcome to the show Canada” and Should a Slave understand the Language of his Master? Should a Citizen not know the Language of Citizenship? and the detractor email and;

citizenship (n.)
“status, rights, privileges, and responsibilities of a citizen,” 1610s, from citizen + -ship.

slave (n.)
late 13c., “person who is the chattel or property of another,” from Old French esclave (13c.), from Medieval Latin Sclavus “slave” (source also of Italian schiavo, French esclave, Spanish esclavo), originally “Slav” (see Slav); so used in this secondary sense because of the many Slavs sold into slavery by conquering peoples.

This sense development arose in the consequence of the wars waged by Otto the Great and his successors against the Slavs, a great number of whom they took captive and sold into slavery. [Klein]

Meaning “one who has lost the power of resistance to some habit or vice” is from 1550s. Applied to devices from 1904, especially those which are controlled by others (compare slave jib in sailing, similarly of locomotives, flash bulbs, amplifiers). Slave-driver is attested from 1807; extended sense of “cruel or exacting task-master” is by 1854. Slave state in U.S. history is from 1812. Slave-trade is attested from 1734.
Old English Wealh “Briton” also began to be used in the sense of “serf, slave” c.850; and Sanskrit dasa-, which can mean “slave,” apparently is connected to dasyu- “pre-Aryan inhabitant of India.” Grose’s dictionary (1785) has under Negroe “A black-a-moor; figuratively used for a slave,” without regard to race. More common Old English words for slave were þeow (related to þeowian “to serve”) and þræl (see thrall). The Slavic words for “slave” (Russian rab, Serbo-Croatian rob, Old Church Slavonic rabu) are from Old Slavic *orbu, from the PIE root *orbh- (also source of orphan), the ground sense of which seems to be “thing that changes allegiance” (in the case of the slave, from himself to his master). The Slavic word is also the source of robot.


finance (v.)
late 15c., “to ransom” (obsolete), from finance (n.). Sense of “to manage money” is recorded from 1827; that of “to furnish with money” is from 1866. Related: Financed; financing.
finance (n.)
c. 1400, “an end, settlement, retribution,” from Old French finance “end, ending; pardon, remission; payment, expense; settlement of a debt” (13c.), noun of action from finer “to end, settle a dispute or debt,” from fin (see fine (n.)). Compare Medieval Latin finis “a payment in settlement, fine or tax.”

The notion is of “ending” (by satisfying) something that is due (compare Greek telos “end;” plural tele “services due, dues exacted by the state, financial means”). The French senses gradually were brought into English: “ransom” (mid-15c.), “taxation” (late 15c.); the sense of “management of money, science of monetary business” first recorded in English 1770.

2014 show 206 sep 03

The fact in law is that there is no provision in any law to transfer (convey) the given name to any artificial dead legal person, corporation or trust.

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Tonight’s topic among others: More on the History of the Birth Certificate and Daniel’s Adventures in Legal Land! and
noticeonline.info/christianremedyinlaw/ Wayback


bond v.
1670s (transitive), from bond n.. Intransitive sense from 1836. Originally of things; of persons by 1969. Related: Bonded; bonding. Male bonding attested by 1969.
bond n.
early 13c., “anything that binds,” phonetic variant of band (n.1). For vowel change, see long (adj.); also influenced by Old English bonda “householder,” literally “dweller” (see bondage). Legalistic sense first recorded 1590s.
bonded adj.
“legally confirmed by bond,” 1590s, from bond (v.).


certificate n.
early 15c., “action of certifying,” from French certificat, from Medieval Latin certificatum “thing certified,” noun use of neuter past participle of certificare (see certify). Of documents, from mid-15c., especially a document which attests to someone’s authorization to practice or do something (1540s).


scrip n.
“certificate of a right to receive something” (especially a stock share), 1762, probably shortened from (sub)scrip(tion) receipt. Originally “receipt for a portion of a loan subscribed,” meaning “certificate issued as currency” first recorded 1790.


issue v.
c. 1300, “to flow out,” from issue (n.) or else from Old French issu, past participle of issir. Sense of “to send out authoritatively” is from c. 1600; that of “to supply (someone with something)” is from 1925. Related: Issued; issuing.