2014 show 244 oct 29

It’s Halloween in Utah “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law”, Ave Maria, cut a cheque, kiss a Pope, pick a bale of cotton & a caller with a dim view of the “So called Bible”. Ok!

Advertisements

Directly download mp3


Tonight’s topic among others: It’s Halloween in Utah and Clint forgets to Phone Daniel and Circumventing the 10 Commandments!


The Ten Commandments Exodus 20:2-17 Nkjv

1 I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. You shall have no other gods before Me.

2 You shall not make for yourself a carved image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth; you shall not bow down to them nor serve them. For I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children to the third and fourth generations of those who hate Me, but showing mercy to thousands, to those who love Me and keep My Commandments.

3 You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain, for the Lord will not hold him guiltless who takes His name in vain.

4 Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. In it you shall do no work: you, nor your son, nor your daughter, nor your male servant, nor your female servant, nor your cattle, nor your stranger who is within your gates. For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and hallowed it.

5 Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be long upon the land which the Lord your God is giving you.

6 You shall not murder.

7 You shall not commit adultery.

8 You shall not steal.

9 You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.

10 You shall not covet your neighbor’s house; you shall not covet your neighbor’s wife, nor his male servant, nor his female servant, nor his ox, nor his donkey, nor anything that is your neighbor’s.”


Colossians 2:14 kjv
14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;


The Greeson-Zecca & Mastropalo Debate on What Law are We Under Today? .pdf

Paul confirmed Jesus’ fulfillment of the Law and it’s passing. Through Christ, Christians are “made alive together with Him, having forgiven you all trespasses, having wiped out the hand-writing of requirements that was against us,
which was contrary to us. And He has taken it out of the way, having nailed it to the cross …So let no one judge you in food or in drink, or regarding a festival or a new moon or Sabbaths, which are a shadow of things to come, but the substance is of “Christ” (Col. 2:13-17). The cross was the culmina-tion of Christ’s fulfillment of the Old Testament Law and prophets. By Christ’s death the Law was nailed to the cross and taken out of the way. The Law, including the Sabbath, is no longer binding…

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the LawAleister Crowley


pardon v.
mid-15c., “to forgive for offense or sin,” from Old French pardoner (see pardon n.).
I grant you pardon,’ said Louis XV to Charolais, who, to divert himself, had just killed a man; ‘but I also pardon whoever will kill you.’ [Marquis de Sade, “Philosophy in the Bedroom”]
Related: Pardoned; pardoning. Pardon my French as exclamation of apology for obscene language is from 1895.

pardon n.
late 13c., “papal indulgence,” from Old French pardon, from pardoner “to grant; forgive” (11c., Modern French pardonner), “to grant, forgive,” from Vulgar Latin perdonare “to give wholeheartedly, to remit,” from Latin per- “through, thoroughly” (see per) + donare “give, present” (see donation).
Meaning “passing over an offense without punishment” is from c. 1300, also in the strictly ecclesiastical sense; sense of “pardon for a civil or criminal offense; release from penalty or obligation” is from late 14c. earlier in Anglo-French. Weaker sense of “excuse for a minor fault” is attested from 1540s.


Romans 12:17 Kjv.
17 Recompense to no man evil for evil. Provide things honest in the sight of all men.


keeper n.
c. 1300 (late 13c. as a surname), “one who has charge of some person or thing, warden,” agent noun from keep v.. Sense of “one who carries on some business” is from mid-15c. Sporting sense (originally cricket) is from 1744. Meaning “something (or someone) worth keeping” is attested by 1999. Brother’s keeper is from Genesis iv:9.

peace n.
mid-12c., “freedom from civil disorder,” from Anglo-French pes, Old French pais “peace, reconciliation, silence, permission” (11c., Modern French paix), from Latin pacem (nominative pax) “compact, agreement, treaty of peace, tranquility, absence of war” (source of Provençal patz, Spanish paz, Italian pace), from PIE pag-/pak- “fasten,” related to pacisci “to covenant or agree” (see pact).

peace-keeping n.
also peacekeeping, 1961 in the international sense, from peace + keeping, verbal noun from keep v.. Earlier “preservation of law and order” (mid-15c.). Related: Peace-keeper (1570s).

keep v.
late Old English cepan “to seize, hold,” also “to observe,” from Proto-Germanic kopijan, but with no certain connection to other languages. It possibly is related to Old English capian “to look,” from Proto-Germanic kap- (cepan was used c. 1000 to render Latin observare), which would make the basic sense “to keep an eye on.”


Noon Rest From Work - After Millet
Noon: Rest From Work (After Millet). Gogh, Vincent van. Oil on canvas. 73.0 x 91.0 cm.

rest v.
“sleep,” Old English ræste, reste “rest, bed, intermission of labor, mental peace,” common Germanic (Old Saxon resta “resting place, burial-place,” Dutch rust, Old High German rasta, German Rast “rest, peace, repose”), of uncertain origin.
rest v.
“remainder, that which is left after a separation,” early 15c., from Middle French reste “remnant,” from rester “to remain” (see rest (v.2)). Meaning “others, those not included in a proposition” is from 1530s.


Re
“with reference to,” used from c. 1700 in legalese, from Latin (in) re “in the matter of,” from ablative case of res “matter, thing.” Its use is execrated by Fowler in three different sections of “Modern English Usage.”
Ra
Ra or Re is the ancient Egyptian sun god. By the Fifth Dynasty in the 25th & 24th centuries, he had become a major god in ancient Egyptian religion, identified primarily with the noon sun.
re
word-forming element meaning “back to the original place; again, anew, once more,” also with a sense of “undoing,” c. 1200, from Old French and directly from Latin re- “again, back, anew, against,” “Latin combining form conceivably from Indo-European wret-, metathetical variant of wert- “to turn” [Watkins]. Often merely intensive, and in many of the older borrowings from French and Latin the precise sense of re- is lost in secondary senses or weakened beyond recognition. OED writes that it is “impossible to attempt a complete record of all the forms resulting from its use,” and adds that “The number of these is practically infinite ….” The Latin prefix became red- before vowels and h-, as in redact, redeem, redolent, redundant.
pre
word-forming element meaning “before,” from Old French pre- and Medieval Latin pre-, both from Latin prae (adverb and preposition) “before in time or place,” from PIE peri- (cognates: Oscan prai, Umbrian pre, Sanskrit pare “thereupon,” Greek parai “at,” Gaulish are- “at, before,” Lithuanian pre “at,” Old Church Slavonic pri “at,” Gothic faura, Old English fore “before”), extended form of root per- (1) “beyond” (see per).

The Latin word was active in forming verbs. Also see prae-. Sometimes in Middle English muddled with words in pro- or per-.

press n.
c. 1300, presse, “crowd, throng, company; crowding and jostling of a throng; a massing together,” from Old French presse n. “throng, crush, crowd; wine or cheese press” (11c.), from Latin pressare (see press (v.1)). Late Old English had press “clothes press.”
press v.
“force into service,” 1570s, alteration (by association with press (v.1)) of prest (mid-14c.) “engage by loan, pay in advance,”
press v.
“push against,” early 14c., “to clasp, embrace;” mid-14c. “to squeeze out;” also “to cluster, gather in a crowd;” late 14c., “to press against, exert pressure,” also “assault, assail;” also “forge ahead, push one’s way, move forward,”
giant n.
c. 1300, “fabulous man-like creature of enormous size,” from Old French geant, earlier jaiant “giant, ogre” (12c.), from Vulgar Latin gagantem (nominative gagas), from Latin gigas “a giant,” from Greek Gigas (usually in plural, Gigantes), one of a race of divine but savage and monstrous beings (personifying destructive natural forces), sons of Gaia and Uranus, eventually destroyed by the gods. The word is of unknown origin, probably from a pre-Greek language. Derivation from gegenes “earth-born” is considered untenable.
Ent
*Dauid eóde to ánwíge ongeán ðone ent Goliam
David went in single combat against the giant Goliath,
ent, n.
late Latin ens, entis: see ens n. metaphor. rare.
ent
word-forming element making adjectives from nouns or verbs, from French -ent and directly from Latin -entem (nominative -ens), present participle ending of verbs in -ere/-ire. Old French changed it in many words to -ant, but after c. 1500 some of these in English were changed back to what was supposed to be correct Latin. See -ant.
cent n.
late 14c., from Latin centum “hundred” (see hundred). Middle English meaning was “one hundred,” but it shifted 17c. to “hundredth part” under influence of percent. Chosen in this sense in 1786 as a name for a U.S. currency unit by Continental Congress. The word first was suggested by Robert Morris in 1782 under a different currency plan. Before the cent, Revolutionary and colonial dollars were reckoned in ninetieths, based on the exchange rate of Pennsylvania money and Spanish coin.

represent v.
late 14c., “to bring to mind by description,” also “to symbolize, serve as a sign or symbol of; serve as the type or embodiment of;” from Old French representer “present, show, portray” (12c.), from Latin repraesentare “make present, set in view, show, exhibit, display,” from re-, intensive prefix (see re-), + praesentare “to present,” literally “to place before” (see present v.). Legislative sense is attested from 1650s. Related: Represented; representing.
representative adj.
“serving to represent,” late 14c., from Old French representatif (early 14c.), from Medieval Latin repraesentativus, from stem of Latin repraesentare (see represent). Meaning “standing for others” is from 1620s; in the political sense of “holding the place of the people in the government, having citizens represented by chosen persons” is first recorded 1620s. Meaning “pertaining to or founded on representation of the people” is from 1640s.
representation n.
c. 1400, “image, likeness,” from Old French representacion (14c.) and directly from Latin representationem (nominative representatio), noun of action from past participle stem of repraesentare (see represent). Meaning “statement made in regard to some matter” is from 1670s. Legislative sense first attested 1769.


The Return of the Prodigal Son
The Return of the Prodigal Son. 262 cm × 205 cm. Rembrandt van Rijn. Oil. 1661–1669

lie n.
“an untruth,” Old English lyge “lie, falsehood,” from Proto-Germanic lugiz (cognates: Old Norse lygi, Danish løgn, Old Frisian leyne (fem.), Dutch leugen (fem.), Old High German lugi, German Lüge, Gothic liugn “a lie”), from the root of lie (v.1). To give the lie to “accuse directly of lying” is attested from 1590s. Lie-detector first recorded 1909.

lier n.
“one who reclines;” 1580s, agent noun from lie (v.2).


ran
past tense of run v., Old English ran.
dom
abstract suffix of state, from Old English dom “statute, judgment” (see doom n.). Already active as a suffix in Old English (as in freodom, wisdom). Cognate with German -tum (Old High German tuom).


De facto : In fact, in deed, actually.
This phrase is used to characterize an officer, a govern­ment, a past action, or a state of affairs which must be accepted for all practical purposes, but is illegal or illegitimate.
Thus, an office, position or status exist­ing under a claim or color of right such as a de facto corporation. In this sense it is the contrary of de jure, which means rightful, legitimate, just, or consti­tutional.
Thus, an officer, king, or government de facto is one who is in actual possession of the office or supreme power, but by usurpation, or without lawful title; while an officer, king, or governor de jure is one who has just claim and rightful title to the office or power, but has never had plenary possession of it, or is not in actual possession.
MacLeod v. United States, 229 U.S. 4 1 6, 33 S.Ct. 955, 57 L.Ed.1260.
Blacks Law 4th edition P:375


prodigal adj.
mid-15c., a back-formation from prodigality, or else from Middle French prodigal and directly from Late Latin prodigalis, from Latin prodigus “wasteful,” from prodigere “drive away, waste,” from pro- “forth” (see pro-) + agere “to drive” (see act v.). First reference is to prodigial son, from Vulgate Latin filius prodigus (Luke xv:11-32). As a noun, “prodigal person,” 1590s, from the adjective (the Latin adjective also was used as a noun).

driver n.
“one who drives” in various senses, c. 1400; agent noun from drive v.. Slavery sense is attested by 1796. Driver’s seat is attested by 1867; figurative use by 1954.
2. The person who drives beasts.


design v.
1540s, from Latin designare “mark out, devise, choose, designate, appoint,” from de- “out” (see de-) + signare “to mark,” from signum “a mark, sign” (see sign n.). Originally in English with the meaning now attached to designate; many modern uses of design are metaphoric extensions. Related: Designed; designing.


licence n.
mid-14c., “liberty (to do something), leave,” from Old French licence “freedom, liberty, power, possibility; permission,” (12c.), from Latin licentia “freedom, liberty, license,” from licentem (nominative licens), present participle of licere “to be allowed, be lawful,” from PIE root leik- “to offer, bargain” (cognates: Lettish likstu “I come to terms”). Meaning “formal (usually written) permission from authority to do something” (marry, hunt, drive, etc.) is first attested early 15c. Meaning “excessive liberty, disregard of propriety” is from mid-15c. There have been attempts to confine license to verbal use and licence to noun use (compare advise/advice, devise/device.

licence v.
c. 1400, “grant formal authorization,” from license n.. Related: Licenced; Licencing.

certificate n.
early 15c., “action of certifying,” from French certificat, from Medieval Latin certificatum “thing certified,” noun use of neuter past participle of certificare (see certify). Of documents, from mid-15c., especially a document which attests to someone’s authorization to practice or do something (1540s).


colon n.
“large intestine,” late 14c., from Latinized form of Greek kolon (with a short initial -o-) “large intestine,” which is of unknown origin.

colony n.
late 14c., “ancient Roman settlement outside Italy,” from Latin colonia “settled land, farm, landed estate,” from colonus “husbandman, tenant farmer, settler in new land,” from colere “to inhabit, cultivate, frequent, practice, tend, guard, respect,” from PIE root kwel- (1) “move around” (source of Latin -cola “inhabitant;” see cycle n.). Also used by the Romans to translate Greek apoikia “people from home.” Modern application dates from 1540s.


auto
word-forming element meaning “self, one’s own, by oneself,” from Greek auto- “self, one’s own,” combining form of autos “self, same,” which is of unknown origin. Before a vowel, aut-; before an aspirate, auth-. In Greek also used as a prefix to proper names, as in automelinna “Melinna herself.” The opposite prefix would be allo-.
graph
modern word-forming element meaning “instrument for recording; that which writes, marks, or describes; something written,” from Greek -graphos “-writing, -writer” (as in autographos “written with one’s own hand”), from graphe “writing, the art of writing, a writing,” from graphein “to write, express by written characters,” earlier “to draw, represent by lines drawn” (see -graphy). Adopted widely (Dutch -graaf, German -graph, French -graphe, Spanish -grafo). Related: -grapher; -graphic; -graphical.


signature n.
1530s, a kind of document in Scottish law, from Middle French signature (16c.) or directly from Medieval Latin signatura “signature, a rescript,” in classical Latin “the matrix of a seal,” from signatus, past participle of signare “to mark with a stamp, sign” (see sign v.).
Meaning “one’s own name written in one’s own hand” is from 1570s, replacing sign-manual (early 15c.) in this sense. Musical sense of “signs placed it the beginning of a staff to indicate the key and rhythm” is from 1806. Meaning “a distinguishing mark of any kind” is from 1620s
SIG,
a Saxon word signifying victory. is used in names, as in Sigbert, bright victory. In answers to the Greek vix in Nicander, and the Latin vic, in Victorinus.
nay
word of negation, late 12c., from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse nei, compound of ne “not” (see un-) + ei “ever” (see aye (2)).
, ; adv.No, not; non.
Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional na,
na, conj. Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional (north-west.) 19– na. Etymology : Perhaps formed within English, by compounding. Etymons: English na , no conj.1
tau (Τ τ) :
nineteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, from Hebrew taw, last letter of the Hebrew alphabet, literally “sign, mark.”
In ancient times, Tau was used as a symbol for life and/or resurrection, whereas the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, theta, was considered the symbol of death.
In Biblical times, the Taw was put on men to distinguish those who lamented sin, although newer versions of the Bible have replaced the ancient term “Taw” with “mark” (Ezekiel 9:4) or “signature” (Job 31:35).
ur, (n). An inarticulate sound, uttered instead of a word that the speaker is unable to remember or bring out.
úre gen. pl. of personal pronoun of first person. Of us Adam can yfel and gód, swá swá úre sum (quasi unus ex nobis ), Gen. 3, 22.
úre adj. pronoun. I. our
ure, n.1
Etymology: Anglo-Norman eure, = Old French uevre , euvre , evre (13th cent.; French œuvre ) Latin opera opera n.2
I. in ure:
a. In or into use, practice, or performance. Often with vbs., as bring, come, have, and esp. put (freq. c1510–1630). Also rarely with into.
b. With dependent infinitive.
c. With reference to statutes, etc.: In or into effect, force, or operation. Chiefly with vbs., esp. put.
d. In remembrance or recollection. Only to have..in ure.
e. In or into a state of prevalence or existence. Chiefly with vbs., as come, draw, put.
ure, suffix2
Etymology: French -ure (in e.g. dasyure dasyure n.) and its etymon scientific Latin -urus (also -ura: see note) : ancient Greek οὐρά tail (see uro- comb. form2).
Scientific Latin -urus is found in genus names from 1758 (e.g. Trichiurus trichiure n. at trichiurid n. Derivatives) and -ura from 1764 (e.g. Xiphosura xiphosure n. at xiphosuran adj. and n. Derivatives).
-re
nature n.
late 13c., “restorative powers of the body, bodily processes; powers of growth;” from Old French nature “nature, being, principle of life; character, essence,” from Latin natura “course of things; natural character, constitution, quality; the universe,” literally “birth,” from natus “born,” past participle of nasci “to be born,” from PIE gene- “to give birth, beget” (see genus).

1 Strong’s Number: g5449 Greek: phusis – Nature:
from phuo, “to bring forth, produce,” signifies
(a) “the nature” (i.e., the natural powers of constitution) of a person or thing, Eph 2:3; Jam 3:7 (“kind”); 2Pe 1:4;
(b) “origin, birth,” Rom 2:27, one who by birth is a Gentile, uncircumcised, in contrast to one who, though circumcised, has become spiritually uncircumcised by his iniquity; Gal 2:15;
(c) “the regular law or order of nature,” Rom 1:26, against “nature” (para, “against”); Rom 2:14, adverbially, “by nature” (for Rom 11:21, 24, see NATURAL, Note); 1Cr 11:14; Gal 4:8, “by nature (are no gods),” here “nature” is the emphatic word, and the phrase includes demons, men regarded as deified, and idols; these are gods only in name (the negative, me, denies not simply that they were gods, but the possibility that they could be).

2014 show 239 oct 22

Hyper empathy during Hyper modernity, evil in high places. Caesar is still an Arsehole. Bouvier gets Animalification and many that are first shall be last; and the last first.

Directly download mp3


Tonight’s topic among others: Initially Daniel apologizes for last weeks Hyper Empathetic Outbursts, about those in Power, who Abuse their Offices on a Regular Basis! and a license to get into Heaven and;

Romans 2:11 Kjv
11 For there is no respect of persons with God.
Job 32:21 Kjv
21 Let me not, I pray you, accept any man’s person, neither let me give flattering titles unto man.
Philippians 4:11 Kjv
11 Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content.
James 2:9 Kjv
09 But if ye have respect to persons, ye commit sin, and are convinced of the law as transgressors.
Proverbs 28:21 Kjv
21 To have respect of persons is not good: for for a piece of bread that man will transgress.
Proverbs 24:23 Kjv
23 These things also belong to the wise. It is not good to have respect of persons in judgment.
Proverbs 18:5 Kjv
05 It is not good to accept the person of the wicked, to overthrow the righteous in judgment
Hebrews 12:16 Kjv
16 Lest there be any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for one morsel of meat sold his birthright.
1 Corinthians 5:13 Kjv
13 But them that are without God judgeth. Therefore put away from among yourselves that wicked person.
Leviticus 19:15 Kjv
5 Ye shall do no unrighteousness in judgment: thou shalt not respect the person of the poor, nor honor the person of the mighty: but in righteousness shalt thou judge thy neighbour.
Psalm 138:6 Kjv
6 Though the Lord be high, yet hath he respect unto the lowly: but the proud he knoweth afar off.
Ephesians 6:9 Kjv
9 And, ye masters, do the same things unto them, forbearing threatening: knowing that your Master also is in heaven; neither is there respect of persons with him.
James 2:1 Kjv
2 My brethren, have not the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord of glory, with respect of persons.
Psalm 49:10 Kjv
10 For he seeth that wise men die, likewise the fool and the brutish person perish, and leave their wealth to others.


personate v. rare
1. pretend to be someone you are not; sometimes with fraudulent intentions
She posed as the Czar’s daughter *
2. attribute human qualities to something
*The Greeks personated their gods ridiculous


consent n.
c. 1300, “approval,” also “agreement in sentiment, harmony,” from Old French consente, from consentir (see consent v.). Age of consent is attested from 1809.

consent v.
early 13c., from Old French consentir (12c.) “agree, comply,” from Latin consentire “feel together,” from com- “with” (see com-) + sentire “to feel” (see sense n.). “Feeling together,” hence, “agreeing, giving permission,” apparently a sense evolution that took place in French before the word reached English. Related: Consented; consenting.


implied consent
n. consent when surrounding circumstances exist which would lead a reasonable person to believe that this consent had been given, although no direct, express or explicit words of agreement had been uttered. Examples: a) a “contract” based on the fact that one person has been doing a particular thing and the other person expects him/her to continue; b) the defense in a “date rape” case in which there is a claim of assumed consent due to absence of protest or a belief that “no” really meant “yes,” “maybe” or “later.”


THE THREE STOOGES: Disorder in the Court (1936) (Remastered) (HD 1080p) [Youtube]

union_jack_gate.
Union Jack Gate is Close to the Defense

Moe & Larry play Noughts & Crosses on the Prosecutions Back with Chalk – (The game’s grid markings have been found chalked all over Rome) No matter who wins or looses the Lawyer always plays both sides.
Moe : “I say, Japser. What comes after 75”?
Larry : “76”?
Moe : “That’s the Spirit”

William Jasper
The Boston Tea Party
Conflict and Revolution 1775 to 1776

Psalm 75 Kjv
5 Lift not up your horn on high: speak not with a stiff neck.
6 For promotion cometh neither from the east, nor from the west, nor from the south.
7 But God is the judge: he putteth down one, and setteth up another.

Whig
British political party, 1657, in part perhaps a disparaging use of whigg “a country bumpkin” (1640s); but mainly a shortened form of Whiggamore (1649) “one of the adherents of the Presbyterian cause in western Scotland who marched on Edinburgh in 1648 to oppose Charles I.” Perhaps originally “a horse drover,” from dialectal verb whig “to urge forward” + mare. In 1689 the name was first used in reference to members of the British political party that opposed the Tories. American Revolution sense of “colonist who opposes Crown policies” is from 1768. Later it was applied to opponents of Andrew Jackson (as early as 1825), and taken as the name of a political party (1834) that merged into the Republican Party in 1854-56.

In the spring of 1834 Jackson’s opponents adopted the name Whig, traditional term for critics of executive usurpations. James Watson Webb, editor of the New York Courier and Enquirer, encouraged use of the name. [Henry] Clay gave it national currency in a speech on April 14, 1834, likening “the whigs of the present day” to those who had resisted George III, and by summer it was official. [Daniel Walker Howe, “What Hath God Wrought,” 2007, p.390] …

asoasf


fiction n.
early 15c., ficcioun, “that which is invented or imagined in the mind,” from Old French
ficcion “dissimulation, ruse; invention, fabrication” (13c.) and directly from Latin fictionem (nominative fictio) “a fashioning or feigning,” noun of action from past participle stem of fingere “to shape, form, devise, feign,” originally “to knead, form out of clay,” from PIE *dheigh- “to build, form, knead” (source also of Old English dag “dough;” see dough).

Meaning “prose works (not dramatic) of the imagination” is from 1590s, at first often including plays and poems. Narrower sense of “the part of literature comprising novels and short stories based on imagined scenes or characters” is by early 19c. The legal sense (fiction of law) is from 1580s. A writer of fiction could be a fictionist (1827). The related Latin words included the literal notion “worked by hand,” as well as the figurative senses of “invented in the mind; artificial, not natural”: Latin fictilis “made of clay, earthen;” fictor “molder, sculptor” (also borrowed 17c. in English), but also of Ulysses as “master of deceit;” fictum “a deception, falsehood; fiction.”


ARTIFICIAL PRESUMPTIONS Al-
so called “legal presumptions;” those which derive their force and effect from the law, rather than their natural tendency to produce
belief. 3 S t a r k ie, Ev. 1235. Black’s Law 1st Edition – Sec. A


believe v.
Old English belyfan “to believe,” earlier geleafa (Mercian), gelefa (Northumbrian), gelyfan (West Saxon) “believe,” from Proto-Germanic *ga-laubjan “to believe,” perhaps literally “hold dear, love” (cognates: Old Saxon gilobian “believe,” Dutch geloven, Old High German gilouben, German glauben), ultimately a compound based on PIE *leubh- “to care, desire, love” (see belief).

Spelling beleeve is common till 17c.; then altered, perhaps by influence of relieve, etc. To believe on instead of in was more common in 16c. but now is a peculiarity of theology; believe of also sometimes was used in 17c. Related: Believed (formerly occasionally beleft); believing. Expression believe it or not attested by 1874; Robert Ripley’s newspaper cartoon of the same name is from 1918. Emphatic you better believe attested from 1854.

Matthew 6:24 Wyc
24 No man may serve two lords, for either he shall hate the one, and love the other; either he shall sustain the one, and despise the other. Ye be not able to serve God and riches.

Mammon n.
“personification of wealth,” mid-14c., from Late Latin mammona, from Greek mamonas, from Aramaic mamona, mamon “riches, gain;” left untranslated in Greek New Testament (e.g. Matt. vi:24, Luke xvi:9-13) retained in the Vulgate, and regarded mistakenly by medieval Christians as the name of a demon.


What is BELIEF?

A conviction of the truth of a proposition, existing subjectively in the mind, and induced by argument, persuasion, or proof addressed to the judgment Keller v. State, 102 Ga. 506, 31 S. E. 92. Belief is to be distinguished from “proof,” “evidence,” and “testimony.” See EVIDENCE. With regard to things which make not a very deep impression on the memory, it may be called “belief.” “Knowledge” is nothing more than a man’s firm belief. The difference is ordinarily merely in the degree ; to be judged of by the court, when addressed to the court; by the jury, when addressed to the jury. Hatch v. Carpenter, 9 Gray (Mass.) 274. The distinction between the two mental conditions seems to be that knowledge is an assurance of a fact or proposition founded on perception by the senses, or intuition; while belief is an assurance gained by evidence, and from other persons. Abbott

Bel
heaven-and-earth god of Babylonian religion, from Akkadian Belu, literally “lord, owner, master,” cognate with Hebrew ba’al.

belie v.
Old English beleogan “to deceive by lies,” from be- + lie (v.1) “to lie, tell lies.” Current sense of “to contradict as a lie” is first recorded 1640s. The other verb lie once also had a formation like this, from Old English belicgan, which meant “to encompass, beleaguer,” and in Middle English was a euphemism for “to have sex with” (i.e. “to lie with carnally”).

believe v.
Old English belyfan “to believe,” earlier geleafa (Mercian), gelefa (Northumbrian), gelyfan (West Saxon) “believe,” from Proto-Germanic *ga-laubjan “to believe,” perhaps literally “hold dear, love” (cognates: Old Saxon gilobian “believe,” Dutch geloven, Old High German gilouben, German glauben), ultimately a compound based on PIE *leubh- “to care, desire, love” (see belief).


BEHAVIOR. Manner of having, holding, or keep­ing one’s self ; manner of behaving, whether good or bad ; conduct ; manners ; carriage of one’s self, with respect to propriety and morals ; deport­ment. Webster. State v. Roll, 1 Ohio Dec. 284 ;Schneiderman v. United States, CaL, 63 S.Ct. 1333,1340, 320 U.S. 118, 87 L.Ed. 1796.
Surety to be of good behavior is a larger requirement than surety to keep the peace. Dalton, c. 122 ; 4 Burns,
Just. 355. pee Good Behavior. Blacks 4th


reality n.
1540s, “quality of being real,” from French réalité and directly Medieval Latin realitatem (nominative realitas), from Late Latin realis (see real (adj.)). Meaning “real existence, all that is real” is from 1640s; that of “the real state (of something)” is from 1680s. Sometimes 17c.-18c. also meaning “sincerity.” Reality-based attested from 1960. Reality television from 1991.


university n.
c. 1300, “institution of higher learning,” also “body of persons constituting a university,” from Anglo-French université, Old French universite “universality; academic community” (13c.), from Medieval Latin universitatem (nominative universitas), “the whole, aggregate,” in Late Latin “corporation, society,” from universus “whole, entire” (see universe). In the academic sense, a shortening of universitas magistrorum et scholarium “community of masters and scholars;” superseded studium as the word for this. The Latin word also is the source of Spanish universidad, German universität, Russian universitetŭ, etc.


employment n.
mid-15c., “the spending of money,” from Middle English emploien (see employ) + -ment.

mentis
mind; reason| intellect| judgement; plan| intention| frame of mind; courage

em suf.
the form assumed by the prefix en- prefix1 (q.v.) before b, p, and (frequently) m. For the reasons stated under en- prefix1, nearly all the English words with this prefix, whether of Romanic or English formation, have (or formerly had) alternative forms with impre.
a. em– + (n.,) ‘to put (something) into or upon what is denoted by the n.’; also ‘to put what is denoted by the n. into’ (something).
im-, pre.
assimilated form of in- prefix2, before b, m, p. This assimilation took place in Latin during the later classical period, and remains in French and English (although in- (en-) was not infrequent before p in Old French and Middle English). In words that survived in living use, Latin in-, im- became in Old French en-, em-.
imp, v.
1. trans. To graft, engraft. Obs.
b. In fig. context, applied to persons. Obs.
2. A subaltern or puny devil.
6. nonce-use. To mock like an imp or demon.
subaltern n.
“junior military officer,” 1680s, earlier more generally, “person of inferior rank” (c. 1600), noun use of adjective subaltern “having an inferior position, subordinate” (1580s), from Middle French subalterne, from Late Latin subalternus, from Latin sub “under” (see sub-) + alternus “every other (one), one after the other” (see alternate (adj.)).

P, n. Rho is the 17th letter of the Greek alphabet – It is derived from Phoenician letter res (Resh) “head
Hebrew: The letter Resh symbolises a bowed head. This is said to depict the poor man (raash), in acknowledgment of his state of servitude.
According to the Talmud (Oral Law), the letter Resh denotes the word rashah, meaning ‘a wicked person‘.
oi, int. and n.
Used to attract attention. Also used to express objection or annoyance.
loi nf (règle commune) (ruling) law n.
Eng: la loi Fre: the law
loy, n.
A kind of spade used in Ireland.
ploy, n.
From Old French emploiier (12c.)
1. Plight, condition; = ply n. 1. rare.
Etymology: A borrowing from French. Etymons: French ploi.
ploy, n.
A lawsuit or legal action; a dispute.
employ, n.
a. The action or fact of using or employing a person to perform a task, job, etc.; = employment n. 4a. Obs.
c. Following a possessive or with of: the state of being employed by a particular person, organization, etc.; the service of an employer.
3. An activity in which a person (or occas. thing) engages; a pursuit, an occupation.


“I dare do all that may become a man; Who dares do more, is none” ― William Shakespeare, Macbeth


foreigner n.
early 15c., foreyner; see foreign + -er (1).

In ordinary use chiefly applied to those who speak a foreign language as their native tongue; thus in England the term is not commonly understood to include Americans. [OED]

In American English from 1620s through mid-19c., however, it was used of a person from a different colony or state. Earlier as a noun in English was simple foreign (early 14c.), probably from Old French, which used the adjective as a noun meaning “foreigner;” also “outskirts; the outside world; latrine, privy.” Spelling furriner, representing pronunciation, is from 1832, originally in Irish dialect pieces but by 1840s picked up by American dialect writers (Thomas Chandler Haliburton).

alien n.
“foreigner, citizen of a foreign land,” from alien (adj.). In the science fiction sense, from 1953.


I have never understood why it is “greed” to want to keep the money you have earned but not greed to want to take somebody else’s money.” ― Thomas Sowell, Barbarians inside the Gates and Other Controversial Essays. Hoover Institution Press (January 1, 1999)


(The Rich Young Man) Mark 10:17-31 Kjv

2014 show 234 oct 15

Clint returns from Holidays this evening with a beautiful story + I’M MAD AS HELL AND I’M NOT GONNA TAKE THIS ANYMORE.

Directly download mp3

Tonight’s topic among others: The show has been running for just over a year, Happy one year anniversary Corporation nation and an Analysis of Matthew  6 .. The Lord’s Prayer and over population (Not) and shooting from the hip and  a rant about weirdo bastards @ 00H:12m:24s and;

Matthew 6 Wycliffe Bible (WYC)

6 Take heed, that ye do not your rightwiseness before men, to be seen of them, else ye shall have no meed at your Father that is in heavens [else ye shall not have meed of your Father which is in heavens].

2 Therefore when thou doest alms, do not thou trumpet before thee, as hypocrites do in synagogues and streets, that they be worshipped of men[a]; soothly I say to you, they have received their meed.

3 But when thou doest alms, know not thy left hand what thy right hand doeth,

4 that thine alms be in huddles, and thy Father that seeth in huddles, shall requite thee [shall yield to thee].

5 And when ye pray, ye shall not be as hypocrites, that love to pray standing in synagogues and [in] corners of streets, to be seen of men [that they be seen of men]; truly I say to you, they have received their meed.

6 But when thou shalt pray, enter into thy bedchamber, and when the door is shut, pray thy Father in huddles, and thy Father that seeth in huddles, shall yield to thee.

7 But in praying do not ye speak much, as heathen men do, for they guess that they be heard in their much speech.

8 Therefore do not ye be made like to them, for your Father knoweth what is need to you [for your Father knoweth what is needful to you], before that ye ask him.

9 And thus ye shall pray, Our Father that art in heavens, hallowed be thy name;

10 thy kingdom come to; be thy will done in earth as it is in heaven[b];

11 give to us this day our each day’s bread;

12 and forgive to us our debts, as we forgive to our debtors;

13 and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

14 For if ye forgive to men their sins, your heavenly Father shall forgive to you your trespasses.

@ 00H:10m:25s

constitution (n.)
mid-14c., “law, regulation, edict,” from Old French constitucion (12c.) “constitution, establishment,” and directly from Latin constitutionem (nominative constitutio) “act of settling, settled condition, anything arranged or settled upon, regulation, order, ordinance,” from constitut-, past participle stem of constituere (see constitute).
unconscionable (adj.)
1560s, “showing no regard for conscience,” from un- (1) + now rare conscionable “conscientious.” Related: Unconscionably.
conscionable (adj.)
1540s, from conscioned “having a conscience” (from conscience) + -able; obsolete from early 18c. but fossilized in its negative, unconscionable.
scapegoat (n.)
1530, “goat sent into the wilderness on the Day of Atonement, symbolic bearer of the sins of the people,” coined by Tyndale from scape (n.1) + goat to translate Latin caper emissarius, itself a translation in Vulgate of Hebrew ‘azazel (Lev. xvi:8,10,26), which was read as ‘ez ozel “goat that departs,” but which others hold to be the proper name of a devil or demon in Jewish mythology (sometimes identified with Canaanite deity Aziz).

Jerome’s reading also was followed by Martin Luther (der ledige Bock), Symmachus (tragos aperkhomenos), and others (compare French bouc émissaire), but the question of who, or what (or even where) is meant by ‘azazel is a vexed one. The Revised Version (1884) simply restores Azazel. But the old translation has its modern defenders:

Azazel is an active participle or participial noun, derived ultimately from azal (connected with the Arabic word azala, and meaning removed), but immediately from the reduplicate form of that verb, azazal. The reduplication of the consonants of the root in Hebrew and Arabic gives the force of repetition, so that while azal means removed, azalzal means removed by a repetition of acts. Azalzel or azazel, therefore, means one who removes by a series of acts. … The interpretation is founded on sound etymological grounds, it suits the context wherever the word occurs, it is consistent with the remaining ceremonial of the Day of Atonement, and it accords with the otherwise known religious beliefs and symbolical practices of the Israelites. [Rev. F. Meyrick, “Leviticus,” London, 1882]

Meaning “one who is blamed or punished for the mistakes or sins of others” first recorded 1824; the verb is attested from 1943. Related: Scapegoated; scapegoating. For the formation, compare scapegrace, also scape-gallows “one who deserves hanging.”

scapegrace (n.)
1767, from scape (v.) + grace (n.); as if “one who escapes the grace of God.” Possibly influenced by scapegoat.
whore (n.)
1530s spelling alteration (see wh-) of Middle English hore, from Old English hore “prostitute, harlot,” from Proto-Germanic *horaz (fem. *horon-) “one who desires” (cognates: Old Norse hora “adulteress,” Danish hore, Swedish hora, Dutch hoer, Old High German huora “whore;” in Gothic only in the masc. hors “adulterer, fornicator,” also as a verb, horinon “commit adultery”), from PIE *ka- “to like, desire,” a base that has produced words in other languages for “lover” (cognates: Latin carus “dear;” Old Irish cara “friend;” Old Persian kama “desire;” Sanskrit Kama, name of the Hindu god of love, kamah “love, desire,” the first element in Kama Sutra).

Whore itself is perhaps a Germanic euphemism for a word that has not survived. The Old English vowel naturally would have yielded *hoor, which is the pronunciation in some dialects; it might have shifted by influence of Middle English homonym hore “physical filth, slime,” also “moral corruption, sin,” from Old English horh. The wh- form became current 16c. A general term of abuse for an unchaste or lewd woman (without regard to money) from at least c. 1200. Of male prostitutes from 1630s. Whore of Babylon is from Rev. xvii:1, 5, etc. In Middle English with occasional plural forms horen, heoranna.

The word, with its derivatives, is now avoided polite speech; its survival in literature, so as it survives, is due to the fact that it is a favorite word with Shakspere (who uses it, with its derivatives, 99 times) and is common in the authorized English version of the Bible … though the American revisers recommended the substitution of harlot as less gross …. [Century Dictionary]

Some equivalent words in other languages also derive from sources not originally pejorative, such as Bohemian nevestka, diminutive of nevesta “bride;” Dutch deern, German dirne originally “girl, lass, wench;” also perhaps Old French pute, perhaps literally “girl,” fem. of Vulgar Latin *puttus (but perhaps rather from Latin putidus “stinking;” see poontang). Welsh putain “whore” is from French, probably via Middle English. Among other languages, Greek porne “prostitute” is related to pernemi “sell,” with an original notion probably of a female slave sold for prostitution; Latin meretrix is literally “one who earns wages” (source of Irish mertrech, Old English miltestre “whore, prostitute”).

The vulgar Roman word was scortum, literally “skin, hide.” Another term was lupa, literally “she-wolf” (preserved in Spanish loba, Italian lupa, French louve; see wolf (n.)). And of course there was prostituta, literally “placed in front,” thus “publicly exposed,” from the fem. past participle of prostituere (see prostitute (n.)). Another Old Norse term was skækja, which yielded Danish skøge, Swedish sköka; probably from Middle Low German schoke, which is perhaps from schode “foreskin of a horse’s penis,” perhaps with the sense of “skin” (compare Latin scortum) or perhaps via an intermediary sense of “vagina.” Spanish ramera, Portuguese ramiera are from fem. form of ramero “young bird of prey,” literally “little branch,” from ramo “branch.” Breton gast is cognate with Welsh gast “bitch,” of uncertain origin. Compare also strumpet, harlot.

Old Church Slavonic ljubodejica is from ljuby dejati “fornicate,” a compound from ljuby “love” + dejati “put, perform.” Russian bljad “whore” derives from Old Church Slavonic bladinica, from bladu “fornication.” Polish nierządnica is literally “disorderly woman.” Sanskrit vecya is a derivation of veca- “house, dwelling,” especially “house of ill-repute, brothel.” Another term, pumccali, means literally “one who runs after men.” Avestan jahika is literally “woman,” but only of evil creatures; another term is kunairi, from pejorative prefix ku- + nairi “woman.”

whore-monger (n.)
1520s, from whore (n.) + monger (n.). A Petrus Hurmonger is in the 1327 Leicestershire Lay Subsidy Rolls.

Ephesians 6:12Wycliffe Bible (WYC)

12 For why striving is not to us against flesh and blood, but against princes and potentates, against governors of the world of these darknesses, against spiritual things of wickedness, in heavenly things.

con (v.2)
“to swindle,” 1896, from con (adj.). Related: Conned; conning.
con (n.1)
“negation” (mainly in pro and con), 1570s, short for Latin contra “against” (see contra).
con-
word-forming element meaning “together, with,” sometimes merely intensive; the form of com- used in Latin before consonants except -b-, -p-, -l-, -m-, or -r-. In native English formations (such as costar), co- tends to be used where Latin would use con-.
sense (n.)
c. 1400, “faculty of perception,” also “meaning, import, interpretation” (especially of Holy Scripture), from Old French sens “one of the five senses; meaning; wit, understanding” (12c.) and directly from Latin sensus “perception, feeling, undertaking, meaning,” from sentire “perceive, feel, know,” probably a figurative use of a literally meaning “to find one’s way,” or “to go mentally,” from PIE root *sent- “to go” (cognates: Old High German sinnan “to go, travel, strive after, have in mind, perceive,” German Sinn “sense, mind,” Old English sið “way, journey,” Old Irish set, Welsh hynt “way”). Application to any one of the external or outward senses (touch, sight, hearing, etc.) in English first recorded 1520s.

A certain negro tribe has a special word for “see;” but only one general word for “hear,” “touch,” “smell,” and “taste.” It matters little through which sense I realize that in the dark I have blundered into a pig-sty. In French “sentir” means to smell, to touch, and to feel, all together. [Erich M. von Hornbostel, “Die Einheit der Sinne” (“The Unity of the Senses”), 1927]

Meaning “that which is wise” is from c. 1600. Meaning “capacity for perception and appreciation” is from c. 1600 (as in sense of humor, attested by 1783, sense of shame, 1640s).

us (pron.)
Old English us (cognate with Old Saxon, Old Frisian us, Old Norse, Swedish oss, Dutch ons, German uns), accusative and dative plural of we, from PIE *nes- (2), forming oblique cases of the first person plural personal pronoun (cognates: Sanskrit nas, Avestan na, Hittite nash “us;” Greek no “we two;” Latin nos “we, us;” Old Church Slavonic ny “us,” nasu “our;” Old Irish ni, Welsh ni “we, us”). The -n- is preserved in Germanic in Dutch ons, German uns.

I’M MAD AS HELL AND I”M NOT GONNA TAKE THIS ANYMORE

I don’t have to tell you things are bad. Everybody knows things are bad. It’s a depression. Everybody’s out of work or scared of losing their job. The dollar buys a nickel’s worth, banks are going bust, shopkeepers keep a gun under the counter. Punks are running wild in the street and there’s nobody anywhere who seems to know what to do, and there’s no end to it. We know the air is unfit to breathe and our food is unfit to eat, and we sit watching our TV’s while some local newscaster tells us that today we had fifteen homicides and sixty-three violent crimes, as if that’s the way it’s supposed to be. We know things are bad – worse than bad. They’re crazy. It’s like everything everywhere is going crazy, so we don’t go out anymore. We sit in the house, and slowly the world we are living in is getting smaller, and all we say is, ‘Please, at least leave us alone in our living rooms. Let me have my toaster and my TV and my steel-belted radials and I won’t say anything. Just leave us alone.’ Well, I’m not gonna leave you alone. I want you to get mad! I don’t want you to protest. I don’t want you to riot – I don’t want you to write to your congressman because I wouldn’t know what to tell you to write. I don’t know what to do about the depression and the inflation and the Russians and the crime in the street. All I know is that first you’ve got to get mad. You’ve got to say, ‘I’m a HUMAN BEING, God damn it! My life has VALUE!’ So I want you to get up now. I want all of you to get up out of your chairs. I want you to get up right now and go to the window. Open it, and stick your head out, and yell, ‘I’M AS MAD AS HELL, AND I’M NOT GOING TO TAKE THIS ANYMORE!’ I want you to get up right now, sit up, go to your windows, open them and stick your head out and yell – ‘I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore!’ Things have got to change. But first, you’ve gotta get mad!… You’ve got to say, ‘I’m as mad as hell, and I’m not going to take this anymore!’ Then we’ll figure out what to do about the depression and the inflation and the oil crisis. But first get up out of your chairs, open the window, stick your head out, and yell, and say it: “I’M AS MAD AS HELL, AND I’M NOT GOING TO TAKE THIS ANYMORE!”