2014 show 262 nov 26

Is the Bible not a compendium of Ancient Knowledge? Bread of deceit is sweet to a man, Confessions Of A Former Truther Government is your god. Volunteerism.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Everyone can benefit from the Bible! Many sections of the Bible, originated long before Christ! The Bible is not a Plagiarism, it is a compendium of Ancient Knowledge! Voluntary Societies – We already Live in One!


Revelation 13:17 Kjb
17 And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.

beast. Any animal with four feet; a brutish, vile, or lecherous person.

monster. A plant or creature terribly deformed. A human-being by birth, but in some part resembling a lower animal.
A monster . . . hath no inheritable blood, and cannot be heir to any land, albeit it be brought forth in marriage; but,
although it hath deformity in any part of its body, yet if it hath human shape, it may be heir
.” 2 Bl Comm 246.
BALLENTINE’S LAW DICTIONARY – THIRD EDITION


signature n.
1530s, a kind of document in Scottish law, from Middle French signature (16c.) or directly from Medieval Latin signatura “signature, a rescript,” in classical Latin “the matrix of a seal,” from signatus, past participle of signare “to mark with a stamp, sign” (see sign n.).
Meaning “one’s own name written in one’s own hand” is from 1570s, replacing sign-manual (early 15c.) in this sense. Musical sense of “signs placed it the beginning of a staff to indicate the key and rhythm” is from 1806. Meaning “a distinguishing mark of any kind” is from 1620s
SIG n.
a Saxon word signifying victory. is used in names, as in Sigbert, bright victory. In answers to the Greek vix in Nicander, and the Latin vic, in Victorinus.
sig Strong’s No.:H7873 pursuing
Transliteration: ώîyg
Pronunciation: seeg
Definition: From H7734; a withdrawl (into a private place): – pursuing.
Occurences: pursuing (1)

1 Kings 18:27 Kjv. And it came to pass at noon, that Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud: for he is a god; either he is talking, or he is pursuing, or he is in a journey, or peradventure he sleepeth, and must be awaked.

pursuing(Webster’s 1828 Dictionary)
pursuing ppr. Following; chasing; hastening after to overtake; prosecuting; proceeding in; continuing.

Gary Rendsburg’s paper (The Mock of Baal in 1 Kings 18:27) The Catholic Biblical Quarterly 1988. Vol 50, No.3

“In short there is good reason to conclude that both elements in the hendiadys, siah and sig, refer to excretion…”

nay
word of negation, late 12c., from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse nei, compound of ne “not” (see un-) + ei “ever” (see aye.
, ; adv.No, not; non.
Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional na,
na, conj. Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional (north-west.) 19– na. Etymology : Perhaps formed within English, by compounding. Etymons: English na , no conj.
tau (Τ τ) :
nineteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, from Hebrew taw, last letter of the Hebrew alphabet, literally “sign, mark.”
In ancient times, Tau was used as a symbol for life and/or resurrection, whereas the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, theta, was considered the symbol of death.
In Biblical times, the Taw was put on men to distinguish those who lamented sin, although newer versions of the Bible have replaced the ancient term “Taw” with “mark” (Ezekiel 9:4) or “signature” (Job 31:35).

The sign of the cross. The mark of Cain… The image of containment or suppression
Letter Perfect p301.
David Sacks. 2003 ISBN 0-7679-1173-3

ur, (n). An inarticulate sound, uttered instead of a word that the speaker is unable to remember or bring out.
úre gen. pl. of personal pronoun of first person. Of us Adam can yfel and gód, swá swá úre sum (quasi unus ex nobis ), Gen. 3, 22.
úre adj. pronoun. I. our
ure, n.1
Etymology: Anglo-Norman *eure, = Old French uevre , euvre , evre (13th cent.; French œuvre ) Latin opera opera n.2(Show Less)
I. in ure:
a. In or into use, practice, or performance. Often with vbs., as bring, come, have, and esp. put (freq. c1510–1630). Also rarely with into.
b. With dependent infinitive.
c. With reference to statutes, etc.: In or into effect, force, or operation. Chiefly with vbs., esp. put.
d. In remembrance or recollection. Only to have..in ure.
e. In or into a state of prevalence or existence. Chiefly with vbs., as come, draw, put.
ure, suffix2
Etymology: French -ure (in e.g. dasyure dasyure n.) and its etymon scientific Latin -urus (also -ura: see note) : ancient Greek οὐρά tail (see uro- comb. form2).
Scientific Latin -urus is found in genus names from 1758 (e.g. Trichiurus trichiure n. at trichiurid n. Derivatives) and -ura from 1764 (e.g. Xiphosura xiphosure n. at xiphosuran adj. and n. Derivatives).
Re
“with reference to,” used from c. 1700 in legalese, from Latin (in) re “in the matter of,” from ablative case of res “matter, thing.” Its use is execrated by Fowler in three different sections of “Modern English Usage.”
Ra
Ra or Re is the ancient Egyptian sun god. By the Fifth Dynasty in the 25th & 24th centuries, he had become a major god in ancient Egyptian religion, identified primarily with the noon sun.
re
word-forming element meaning “back to the original place; again, anew, once more,” also with a sense of “undoing,” c. 1200, from Old French and directly from Latin re- “again, back, anew, against,” “Latin combining form conceivably from Indo-European *wret-, metathetical variant of *wert- “to turn” [Watkins]. Often merely intensive, and in many of the older borrowings from French and Latin the precise sense of re- is lost in secondary senses or weakened beyond recognition. OED writes that it is “impossible to attempt a complete record of all the forms resulting from its use,” and adds that “The number of these is practically infinite ….” The Latin prefix became red- before vowels and h-, as in redact, redeem, redolent, redundant.

nature n.
late 13c., “restorative powers of the body, bodily processes; powers of growth;” from Old French nature “nature, being, principle of life; character, essence,” from Latin natura “course of things; natural character, constitution, quality; the universe,” literally “birth,” from natus “born,” past participle of nasci “to be born,” from PIE *gene- “to give birth, beget” (see genus).

Nature Greek: phusis – Strong’s No.:g5449
from phuo, “to bring forth, produce,” signifies
(a) “the nature” (i.e., the natural powers of constitution) of a person or thing, Eph 2:3; Jam 3:7 (“kind”); 2Pe 1:4;
(b) “origin, birth,” Rom 2:27, one who by birth is a Gentile, uncircumcised, in contrast to one who, though circumcised, has become spiritually uncircumcised by his iniquity; Gal 2:15;
(c) “the regular law or order of nature,” Rom 1:26, against “nature” (para, “against”); Rom 2:14, adverbially, “by nature” (for Rom 11:21, 24, see NATURAL, Note); 1Cr 11:14; Gal 4:8, “by nature (are no gods),” here “nature” is the emphatic word, and the phrase includes demons, men regarded as deified, and idols; these are gods only in name (the negative, me, denies not simply that they were gods, but the possibility that they could be).


evil adj.
Old English yfel (Kentish evel) “bad, vicious, ill, wicked,” from Proto-Germanic ubilaz (cognates: Old Saxon ubil, Old Frisian and Middle Dutch evel, Dutch euvel, Old High German ubil, German übel, Gothic ubils), from PIE *upelo-, from root *wap- “bad, evil” (cognates: Hittite huwapp- “evil”).

In Old English and other older Germanic languages other than Scandinavian, “this word is the most comprehensive adjectival expression of disapproval, dislike or disparagement” [OED]. Evil was the word the Anglo-Saxons used where we would use bad, cruel, unskillful, defective (adj.), or harm n., crime, misfortune, disease n.. In Middle English, bad took the wider range of senses and evil began to focus on moral badness. Both words have good as their opposite. Evil-favored (1520s) meant “ugly.” Evilchild is attested as an English surname from 13c.

The adverb is Old English yfele, originally of words or speech. Also as a noun in Old English,
“what is bad; sin, wickedness; anything that causes injury, morally or physically.”

Especially of a malady or disease from c. 1200. The meaning “extreme moral wickedness” was one of the senses of the Old English noun, but it did not become established as the main sense of the modern word until 18c. As a noun, Middle English also had evilty. Related: Evilly. Evil eye (Latin oculus malus) was Old English eage yfel. The jocular notion of an evil twin as an excuse for regrettable deeds is by 1986, American English, from an old motif in mythology.


god n.
Old English god “supreme being, deity; the Christian God; image of a god; godlike person,” from Proto-Germanic guthan (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Dutch god, Old High German got, German Gott, Old Norse guð, Gothic guþ), from PIE ghut– “that which is invoked” (cognates: Old Church Slavonic zovo “to call,” Sanskrit huta- “invoked,” an epithet of Indra), from root *gheu(e)- “to call, invoke.”

I want my lawyer, my tailor, my servants, even my wife to believe in God, because it means that I shall be cheated and robbed and cuckolded less often. … If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him. [Voltaire]

  1. Any person or thing exalted too much in estimation, or deified and honored as the chief good.

graven adj.
“sculpted, carved,” late 14c., past participle adjective from grave (v.) + -en (1).

Exodus 20:4 Kjb
Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth.


similitude n.
late 14c., from Old French similitude “similarity, relationship, comparison” (13c.) and directly from Latin similitudinem (nominative similitudo) “likeness, resemblance,” from similis “like” (see similar).
verisimilitude n.
“appearance of truth or reality, likelihood,” c. 1600, from French verisimilitude (1540s), from Latin verisimilitudo “likeness to truth,” from veri, genitive of verum, neuter of verus “true” (see very) + similis “like, similar” (see similar). Related: Verisimilar.

image n.
c. 1200, “piece of statuary; artificial representation that looks like a person or thing,” from Old French image “image, likeness; figure, drawing, portrait; reflection; statue,” earlier imagene (11c.), from Latin imaginem (nominative imago) “copy, imitation, likeness; statue, picture,” also “phantom, ghost, apparition,” figuratively “idea, appearance,” from stem of imitari “to copy, imitate” (see imitation).

To þe ymage of god he made hym [Gen. i:27, Wycliffite Bible, early version, 1382]

Meaning “reflection in a mirror” is early 14c. The mental sense was in Latin, and appears in English late 14c. Sense of “public impression” is attested in isolated cases from 1908 but not in common use until its rise in the jargon of advertising and public relations, c. 1958.


Deuteronomy 4:16 Kjb
Lest ye corrupt yourselves, and make you a graven image, the similitude of any figure, the likeness of male or female,


wizard of id


coincide v.
1705, “be identical in substance or nature,” but from 1640s as a verb in English in Latin form, “occupy the same space, agree in position,” from Medieval Latin coincidere (used in astrology), literally “to fall upon together,” from Latin com- “together” (see co-) + incidere “to fall upon” (in- “upon” + cadere “to fall;” see case (n.1)). From 1809 as “occur at the same time.” Related: Coincided; coinciding.
cide
word-forming element meaning “killer,” from French -cide, from Latin -cida “cutter, killer, slayer,” from -cidere, comb. form of caedere “to strike down, chop, beat, hew, fell, slay,” from PIE kae-id-, from root *(s)k(h)ai- “to strike” (Pokorny, not in Watkins; cognates: Sanskrit skhidati “beats, tears,” Lithuanian kaisti “shave,” German heien “beat”). For Latin vowel change, see acquisition. The element also can represent “killing,” from French –cide*, from Latin -cidium “a cutting, a killing.”


ism n.
“distinctive doctrine, theory, or practice,” 1670s, the suffix -ism used as an independent word, chiefly disparagingly. Related: Ismatical. By the same path, ist is from 1811.
ism
word-forming element making nouns implying a practice, system, doctrine, etc., from French -isme or directly from Latin -isma, -ismus (source also of Italian, Spanish -ismo, Dutch, German -ismus), from Greek -ismos, noun ending signifying the practice or teaching of a thing, from the stem of verbs in -izein, a verb-forming element denoting the doing of the noun or adjective to which it is attached. For distinction of use, see -ity. The related Greek suffix -isma(t)- affects some forms.


Confessions Of A Former Truther


Proverbs 20:17 Kjb
Bread of deceit is sweet to a man; but afterwards his mouth shall be filled with gravel.

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