2014 show 281 dec 31

In the year of our Dark Lord Vulgaris and; thank God Christ is dead, we can all live in a lie and not take responsibility for anything and pay for our Sins in Cash.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Clint and Daniel continue to search for a path through the legal ties that bind us to the Fiction!


anno Domini nostri Iesu (or Jesu) Christi
Vulgaris aerae (Vulgar Era)


lord v.
c. 1300, “to exercise lordship,” from lord (n.). Meaning “to play the lord, domineer” is late 14c. Related: Lorded; lording. To lord it is from 1570s.
lord n.
mid-13c., laverd, loverd, from Old English hlaford “master of a household, ruler, superior,” also “God” (translating Latin Dominus, though Old English drihten was used more often), earlier hlafweard, literally “one who guards the loaves,” from hlaf “bread, loaf” (see loaf (n.)) + weard “keeper, guardian” (see ward (n.)). Compare lady (literally “bread-kneader”), and Old English hlafæta “household servant,” literally “loaf-eater.” Modern monosyllabic form emerged 14c. As an interjection from late 14c. Lord’s Prayer is from 1540s. Lord of the Flies translates Beelzebub (q.v.) and was name of 1954 book by William Golding. To drink like a lord is from 1620s.


invent v.
c. 1500, “to find, discover” (obsolete), a back-formation from invention or else from Latin inventus, past participle of invenire “to come upon; devise, discover.” General sense of “make up, fabricate, concoct, devise” (a plot, excuse, etc.) is from 1530s, as is that of “produce by original thought, find out by original study or contrivance.” Related: Invented; inventing.
inventor n.
c. 1500, “a discoverer, one who finds out” (now obsolete), from Latin inventor (fem. inventrix, source of French inventeur (15c.), Spanish inventor, Italian inventore) “contriver, author, discoverer, proposer, founder,” agent noun from past participle stem of invenire “to come upon, find; find out; invent, discover, devise; ascertain; acquire, get earn,” from in- “in, on” (see in- (2)) + venire “to come” (see venue). Meaning “one who contrives or produces a new thing or process” is from 1550s.


https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/the_fall_expelled_from_eden_adam_and_eve_raise_a_family_an_wellcome_v0034422.jpg

Genesis 3 Kjv.
13 And the Lord God said unto the woman, What is this that thou hast done? And the woman said, The serpent beguiled me, and I did eat.
22 And the Lord God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil: and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever:
23 Therefore the Lord God sent him forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground from whence he was taken.
24 So he drove out the man; and he placed at the east of the garden of Eden Cherubims, and a flaming sword which turned every way, to keep the way of the tree of life.


Vúlgar adj. [vulgaire, Fr. vulgaris, Lat.]
Plebian; suiting to the common people; practised among the common people.

Men who have passed all their time in low and vulgar life, cannot have a suitable idea of the several beauties and blemishes in the actions of great men. Addison.
Mean; low; being of the common rate.

It requiring too great a sagacity for vulgar minds to draw the line between virtue and vice, no wonder if most men attempt not a laborious scrutiny into things themselves, but only take names and words, and so rest in them. South.

Nor wasting years my former strength confound, And added woes have bow’d me to the ground: Yet by the stubble you may guess the grain, And mark the ruins of no vulgar man. Broome. Publick; commonly bruited.

Do you hear aught of a battle toward? — Most sure, and vulgar; every one hears that. Shakesp.

vēra
um| verior -or -us| verissimus -a -um ADJ
true | real| genuine | actual; properly named; well founded; right| fair| proper
vere : in fact, real, true.
vere : truly, really, actually, rightly.
vera Ods. Etymology: Apparently veer v.
A command to let out more of the sheet.
veer v.
b. To let out (any line or rope); to allow to run out gradually to a desired length.
vera causa n.
A true cause which brings about an effect as a minimum independent agency.
1977 Brit. Jrnl. Hist. Sci. 10 238 Darwin’s commitment to the vera causa—or ‘true cause’—principle.


https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/screenshot-from-2015-03-07-233422.png?w=840

I wish I could remember where this image is from.
The astute will imidiatly see the genitalia joke.


Miracle n. [ Latin miraculum, from miror, to wonder ]
1. Literally, a wonder or wonderful thing; but appropriately,
2. In theology, an event or effect contrary to the established constitution and course of things, or a deviation from the known laws of nature; a supernatural event. Miracles can be wrought only by Almighty power, as when Christ healed lepers, saying, ‘I will, be thou clean, ‘ or calmed the tempest, ‘Peace, be still.’

They considered not the miracle of the loaves. Mark 6:52.

A man approved of God by miracles and signs. Acts 2:22.

  1. Anciently, a spectacle or dramatic representation exhibiting the lives of the saints.

Anno Lucis Wiki


idolatry n.
“worship of idols and images,” mid-13c., from Old French idolatrie (12c.), from Vulgar Latin idolatria, contraction of Late Latin idololatria (Tertullian), from Ecclesiastical Greek eidololatria “worship of idols,” from eidolon “image” (see idol) + latreia “worship, service” (see –latry).
latry
word-forming element meaning “worship of,” used as an element in native formations from 19c. (such as bardolatry), from Greek -latreia “worship, service paid to the gods, hired labor,” related to latron (n.) “pay, hire,” latris “servant, worshipper,” from PIE *le- (1) “to get” (see larceny).


pope n.
Old English papa (9c.), from Church Latin papa “bishop, pope” (in classical Latin, “tutor”), from Greek papas “patriarch, bishop,” originally “father.” Applied to bishops of Asia Minor and taken as a title by the Bishop of Alexandria c.250. In Western Church, applied especially to the Bishop of Rome since the time of Leo the Great (440-461) and claimed exclusively by them from 1073 (usually in English with a capital P-). Popemobile, his car, is from 1979. Papal, papacy, later acquisitions in English, preserve the original vowel.
popery n.
1530s, a hostile coinage of the Reformation, from pope + –ery.
ery
word-forming element making nouns meaning “place for, art of, condition of, quantity of,” from Middle English -erie, from Latin -arius (see -ary). Also sometimes in modern colloquial use “the collectivity of” or “an example of.”


perversion n.
late 14c., “action of turning aside from truth, corruption, distortion” (originally of religious beliefs), from Latin perversionem (nominative perversio) “a turning about,” noun of action from past participle stem of pervertere (see pervert (v.)). Psychological sense of “disorder of sexual behavior in which satisfaction is sought through channels other than those of normal heterosexual intercourse” is from 1892, originally including homosexuality.

Perversions are defined as unnatural acts, acts contrary to nature, bestial, abominable, and detestable. Such laws are interpretable only in accordance with the ancient tradition of the English common law which … is committed to the doctrine that no sexual activity is justifiable unless its objective is procreation. [A.C. Kinsey, et.al., “Sexual Behavior in the Human Male,” 1948]
per
word-forming element meaning “through, throughout; thoroughly; entirely, utterly,” from Latin preposition per (see per (prep.)).
version n.
1580s, “a translation,” from Middle French version, from Medieval Latin versionem (nominative versio) “a turning, a translation,” from past participle stem of Latin vertere “to turn, change, alter, translate” (see versus). Also with a Middle English sense of “destruction;” the meaning “particular form of a description” is first attested 1788.


atonement n.
1510s, “condition of being at one (with others),” from atone + -ment. Meaning “reconciliation” (especially of sinners with God) is from 1520s; that of “propitiation of an offended party” is from 1610s.

attorney n.
early 14c. (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin), from Old French atorné “(one) appointed,” past participle of aturner “to decree, assign, appoint,” from atorner (see attorn). The legal Latin form attornare influenced the spelling in Anglo-French. The sense is of “one appointed to represent another’s interests.”

In English law, a private attorney was one appointed to act for another in business or legal affairs (usually for pay); an attorney at law or public attorney was a qualified legal agent in the courts of Common Law who prepared the cases for a barrister, who pleaded them (the equivalent of a solicitor in Chancery). So much a term of contempt in England that it was abolished by the Judicature Act of 1873 and merged with solicitor.

Johnson observed that “he did not care to speak ill of any man behind his back, but he believed the gentleman was an attorney.” [Boswell]

The double -t- is a mistaken 15c. attempt to restore a non-existent Latin original. Attorney general first recorded 1530s in sense of “legal officer of the state” (late 13c. in Anglo-French), from French, hence the odd plural (subject first, adjective second).


unconscionable adj. adv. n.
a. Of actions, behaviour, etc.: showing no regard for conscience; not in accordance with what is right or reasonable.
b. Unreasonably excessive; exorbitant. Also in weakened sense: extremely or unbelievably large, long, etc.; inordinate.
c. As an intensifier: outrageous, arrant; flagrant
d. Law. Of a contract, bargain, etc.: grossly unfair, esp. to a weaker party, and therefore liable to be set aside or modified by a court.
a. Having no conscience; acting or inclined to act without regard for what is right; unscrupulous, esp. out of avarice.


Undue adj.
1. Not due; not yet demandable of right; as a debt, note or bond undue
2. Not right; not legal; improper; as an undue proceeding.
3. Not agreeable to a rule or standard, or to duty; not proportioned; excessive; as an undue regard to the externals of religion; an undue attachment to forms; an undue rigor in the execution of law.

2014 show 276 dec 17

fraus est celare fraudem, Tell me, ye that desire to be under the law, do ye not hear the law? Inside the court of the unknown yield.

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Tonight’s topic among others: the Word FRAUD! Lie means to exist, or to subsist in the Fiction! We Live in A Lie! Lets talk about fraud and;


Galatians 3 Kjv
1 O foolish Galatians, who hath bewitched you, that ye should not obey the truth, before whose eyes Jesus Christ hath been evidently set forth, crucified among you?


E. W. Bullinger Known for The Companion Bible Wiki


fore
Middle English for-, fore-, from Old English fore-, often for- or foran-, from fore (adv. & prep.), which was used as a prefix in Old English as in other Germanic languages with a sense of “before in time, rank, position,” etc., or designating the front part or earliest time.
given adj.
late 14c., “allotted, predestined,” past participle adjective from give (v.). From 1560s as “admitted, supposed, allowed as a supposition.” From late 14c. as “disposed, addicted.” Middle English also had a noun give, yeve “that which is given or offered freely.” The modern noun sense of “what is given, known facts” is from 1879. Given name (1827) so called because given at baptism.
noun n.
late 14c., from Anglo-French noun “name, noun,” from Old French nom, non (Modern French nom), from Latin nomen “name, noun” (see name (n.)). Old English used name to mean “noun.” Related: Nounal.


fraud n.
mid-14c., “criminal deception” (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin); from Old French fraude “deception, fraud” (13c.), from Latin fraudem (nominative fraus) “a cheating, deceit,” of persons “a cheater, deceiver.” Not in Watkins; perhaps ultimately from PIE *dhreugh- “to deceive” (cognates: Sanskrit dhruti- “deception; error”). Meaning “a fraudulent production, something intended to deceive” is from 1650s. The meaning “impostor, deceiver, pretender; humbug” is attested from 1850. Pious fraud (1560s) is properly “deception practiced for the sake of what is deemed a good purpose;” colloquially used as “person who talks piously but is not pious at heart.”

fraus est celare fraudem. It is fraud to conceal a fraud. Anno: 50 ALR 807.
fraus legis. Fraud of the law; fraud upon the law.


fictio. A fiction.
fiction. In the sense of a fiction of law, a contrived condition or situation; the simulation of a status or condition with the purposeof accomplishing justice, albeit justice reached by devious means, as the fiction of casual ejector whereby the action of ejectment was converted into an action for the determination of title to real estate. 25 Am J2d Eject § 2.
As a literary work, a novel, a portrayal with imaginary characters. In pleading a false averment on the part of the plaintiff
which the defendant is not allowed to traverse, the object being to give the court jurisdiction. Snider v Newell, 132 NC 614,
625, 44 SE 354
.
fictione juris. Fiction of law. See fiction.
fiction of law. See fiction.
fictitious. Imaginary; not real; counterfeit; false; not genuine. State v Tinnin, 64 Utah 587, 232 P 543, 43 ALR 46, 48.


passover
The Passover in the Holy Family: Gathering Bitter Herbs Watercolor 1855-56 16 x 17inches

Easter Vs Passover

Nelson’s Bible Dictionary
“Easter was originally a pagan festival honoring Eostre, a Teutonic (Germanic) goddess of light and spring. At the time of the vernal equinox (the day in the spring when the sun crosses the equator and day and night are of equal length), sacrifices were offered in her honor. As early as the eighth century, the name was used to designate the annual Christian celebration of the resurrection of Chr-st. The only appearance of the word Easter (Kjv) is a mistranslation of pascha, the ordinary Greek word for ‘Passover’ (Acts 12:4).”
passover Vs easter

Happy-Easter-Rabbit-Egg-Pics
The psychedelic mushroom trip we call Easter.
Christian leaders attempt to fix global date for Easter
The archbishop of Canterbury has announced he is engaged in an ambitious plan to solve one of the oldest disagreements in Christianity – one dating back more than 1,600 years.


perversion n.
late 14c., “action of turning aside from truth, corruption, distortion” (originally of religious beliefs), from Latin perversionem (nominative perversio) “a turning about,” noun of action from past participle stem of pervertere (see pervert (v.)). Psychological sense of “disorder of sexual behavior in which satisfaction is sought through channels other than those of normal heterosexual intercourse” is from 1892, originally including homosexuality.

Perversions are defined as unnatural acts, acts contrary to nature, bestial, abominable, and detestable. Such laws are interpretable only in accordance with the ancient tradition of the English common law which … is committed to the doctrine that no sexual activity is justifiable unless its objective is procreation. [A.C. Kinsey, et.al., “Sexual Behavior in the Human Male,” 1948]
per
word-forming element meaning “through, throughout; thoroughly; entirely, utterly,” from Latin preposition per (see per (prep.)).
version n.
1580s, “a translation,” from Middle French version, from Medieval Latin versionem (nominative versio) “a turning, a translation,” from past participle stem of Latin vertere “to turn, change, alter, translate” (see versus). Also with a Middle English sense of “destruction;” the meaning “particular form of a description” is first attested 1788.


Jonah 1 Kjv
16 And the men dreaded the Lord with great dread, and offered hosts to the Lord, and vowed avows.
17 And the Lord made ready a great fish, that he should swallow Jonah; and Jonah was in the womb of the fish three days and three nights.
Jonah 2 Kjv
2 Then Jonah prayed unto the Lord his God out of the fish’s belly,
2 And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the Lord, and he heard me; out of the belly of hell cried I, and thou heardest my voice.
3 For thou hadst cast me into the deep, in the midst of the seas; and the floods compassed me about: all thy billows and thy waves passed over me.


defender n.
c. 1300 (early 13c. as a surname), via Anglo-French, from Old French defendeor, agent noun from defendre (see defend). The Latin word in this sense was defensor.
defend v.
mid-13c., from Old French defendre (12c.) “defend, resist,” and directly from Latin defendere “ward off, protect, guard, allege in defense,” from de- “from, away” (see de-) + -fendere “to strike, push,” from PIE root *gwhen- “to strike, kill” (see bane). In the Mercian hymns, Latin defendet is glossed by Old English gescildeð. Related: Defended; defending.

Fidei defensorDefender of the Faith” has been one of the subsidiary titles of the English and later British monarchs since it was granted on 11 October, 1521 by Pope Leo X to King Henry VIII of England.

faith n.
mid-13c., faith, feith, fei, fai “faithfulness to a trust or promise; loyalty to a person; honesty, truthfulness,” from Anglo-French and Old French feid, foi “faith, belief, trust, confidence; pledge” (11c.), from Latin fides “trust, faith, confidence, reliance, credence, belief,” from root of fidere “to trust,” from PIE root *bheidh- “to trust” (source also of Greek pistis “faith, confidence, honesty;” see bid). For sense evolution, see belief. Accomodated to other English abstract nouns in -th (truth, health, etc.).

From early 14c. as “assent of the mind to the truth of a statement for which there is incomplete evidence,” especially “belief in religious matters” (matched with hope and charity). Since mid-14c. in reference to the Christian church or religion; from late 14c. in reference to any religious persuasion.

And faith is neither the submission of the reason, nor is it the acceptance, simply and absolutely upon testimony, of what reason cannot reach. Faith is: the being able to cleave to a power of goodness appealing to our higher and real self, not to our lower and apparent self. Matthew Arnold, “Literature Dogma,” 1873

From late 14c. as “confidence in a person or thing with reference to truthfulness or reliability,” also “fidelity of one spouse to another.” Also in Middle English “a sworn oath,” hence its frequent use in Middle English oaths and asseverations (par ma fay, mid-13c.; bi my fay, c. 1300).

titular adj.
1590s, from or based on Middle French titulaire (16c.), from Latin titulus (see title) + -ar. Related: Titulary.

Sales of Slaves.
Slave dealers usually offered their wares at public auction sales (Fig. 29). These were under the supervision of the aediles, who appointed the place and made rules and regulations to govern them. A tax was imposed on imported slaves and they were offered for sale with their feet whitened with chalk; those from the east had also their ears bored, a common sign of slavery among oriental peoples. As bids were asked for each slave he was made to mount a stone or platform, corresponding to the “block” familiar to the readers of our own history.
From his neck hung a scroll (titulus), setting forth his character and serving as a warrant for the purchaser. If the slave had defects not made known in this warrant the vendor was bound to take him back within six months or make good the loss to the buyer.
The chief items in the titulus were the age and nationality of the slave, and his freedom from such common defects as chronic ill-health, especially epilepsy, and tendencies to thievery, running away, and suicide. In spite of the guarantee the purchaser took care to examine the slaves as closely as possible.
For this reason they were commonly stripped, made to move around, handled freely by the purchaser, and even examined by physicians. If no warrant was given by the dealer, a cap (pilleus) was put on the slave’s head at the time of the sale and the purchaser took all risks. The dealer might also offer the slaves at private sale, and this was the rule in the case of all of unusual value and especially of marked personal beauty…
The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Private Life of the Romans, by Harold Whetstone Johnston. The Private Life of the Romans


designation n.
late 14c., “action of pointing out,” from Old French designacion or directly from Latin designationem (nominative designatio) “a marking out, specification,” noun of action from past participle stem of designare (see design (v.)). Meaning “descriptive name” is from 1824.
design v.
1540s, from Latin designare “mark out, devise, choose, designate, appoint,” from de- “out” (see de-) + signare “to mark,” from signum “a mark, sign” (see sign (n.)). Originally in English with the meaning now attached to designate; many modern uses of design are metaphoric extensions. Related: Designed; designing.
design n.
1580s, from Middle French desseign “purpose, project, design,” from Italian disegno, from disegnare “to mark out,” from Latin designare “to mark out” (see design (v.)).
nation n.
c. 1300, from Old French nacion “birth, rank; descendants, relatives; country, homeland” (12c.) and directly from Latin nationem (nominative natio) “birth, origin; breed, stock, kind, species; race of people, tribe,” literally “that which has been born,” from natus, past participle of nasci “be born” (Old Latin gnasci; see genus). Political sense has gradually predominated, but earliest English examples inclined toward the racial meaning “large group of people with common ancestry.” Older sense preserved in application to North American Indian peoples (1640s). Nation-building first attested 1907 (implied in nation-builder).
de
active word-forming element in English and in many words inherited from French and Latin, from Latin de “down, down from, from, off; concerning” (see de), also used as a prefix in Latin usually meaning “down, off, away, from among, down from,” but also “down to the bottom, totally” hence “completely” (intensive or completive), which is its sense in many English words. As a Latin prefix it also had the function of undoing or reversing a verb’s action, and hence it came to be used as a pure privative — “not, do the opposite of, undo” — which is its primary function as a living prefix in English, as in defrost (1895), defuse (1943), etc. Compare also dis-.
SIG,
a Saxon word signifying victory. is used in names, as in Sigbert, bright victory. In answers to the Greek vix in Nicander, and the Latin vic, in Victorinus.
sig Strong’s No.:H7873 pursuing
Transliteration: ώîyg
Pronunciation: seeg
Definition: From H7734; a withdrawl (into a private place): – pursuing.
Occurences: pursuing (1)
nay
word of negation, late 12c., from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse nei, compound of ne “not” (see un-) + ei “ever” (see aye.
, ; adv.No, not; non.
Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional na,
na, conj. Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional (north-west.) 19– na. Etymology : Perhaps formed within English, by compounding. Etymons: English na , no conj.
tau (Τ τ) :
nineteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, from Hebrew taw, last letter of the Hebrew alphabet, literally “sign, mark.”
In ancient times, Tau was used as a symbol for life and/or resurrection, whereas the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, theta, was considered the symbol of death.
In Biblical times, the Taw was put on men to distinguish those who lamented sin, although newer versions of the Bible have replaced the ancient term “Taw” with “mark” (Ezekiel 9:4) or “signature” (Job 31:35).

The sign of the cross. The mark of Cain… The image of containment or suppression Letter Perfect p301. David Sacks. 2003 – ISBN 0-7679-1173-3

ion
word-forming element attached to verbs, making nouns of state, condition, or action, from French -ion or directly from Latin –ionem (nominative -io, genitive -ionis), common suffix forming abstract nouns from verbs.
In Latin found extremely commonly in formations from verbs, typically on the past participial or supine stem (in -t- , -s- , -x- ), e.g. damnātiō damnation n.
Formations within English (chiefly on verbs ultimately of Latin origin) become common from the 16th cent.


addition n.
late 14c., “action of adding numbers;” c. 1400, “that which is added,” from Old French adition “increase, augmentation” (13c.), from Latin additionem (nominative additio) “an adding to, addition,” noun of action from past participle stem of addere (see add). Phrase in addition to “also” is from 1680s.
additional adj.
1640s, from addition + -al (1). Related: Additionally.


dummy n.
1590s, “mute person,” from dumb (adj.) + -y (3). Extended by 1845 to “figure representing a person.” Used in card games (originally whist) since 1736. Meaning “dolt, blockhead” is from 1796.


Proverbs 11:15 Kjv
15 He that is surety for a stranger shall smart for it: and he that hateth suretiship is sure.


gentilitious adj.
1. Characteristic of a ‘gentile’; pagan. Obs.—1
2. Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of, a nation; national. (= gentilitial adj. 1.)
a. Of or pertaining to a gens or family. (= gentilitial adj. 2.)


Frescos+of+the+Brancacci+Chapel+in+Santa+Maria+del+Carmine+in+Florence+scenes-1600x1200-15094
Expulsion from the Garden of Eden. Masaccio. 1425.

circumcised adj.
a. Having the prepuce cut off; that has undergone circumcision. (Allusively used for ‘Jewish’ or ‘Muslim’.)
b. fig. Spiritually chastened or purified.
2. Cut or shorn round. Obs.
3. Cut short, curtailed, circumscribed. Obs.
circumcise n.
mid-13c., “to cut off the foreskin,” from Old French circoncisier “circumcise” (12c., Modern French circoncire), from Latin circumcisus, past participle of circumcidere “to cut round, to cut trim, to cut off” (see circumcision). Related: Circumcised; circumcising.
skin v.
late 14c., “to remove the skin from” (originally of circumcision), from skin (n.). As “to have (a particular kind of) skin” from c. 1400. In 19c. U.S. colloquial use, “to strip, fleece, plunder;” hence skin-game, one in which one player has no chance against the others (as with a stacked deck), the type of con game played in a skin-house. Skin the cat in gymnastics is from 1845. Related: Skinned; skinning.
fleecev.
1530s in the literal sense of “to strip (a sheep) of fleece,” from fleece (n.). From 1570s in the figurative meaning “to cheat, swindle, strip of money.” Related: Fleeced; fleecer; fleecing.

Genesis 3 Kjv
21 Unto Adam also and to his wife did the Lord God make coats of skins, and clothed them.


cognomen n.
1809, from Latin com- “with” (see co-) + (g)nomen “name” (see name (n.)). Third or family name of a Roman citizen (Caius Julius Cæsar).
cognate adj.
1640s, from Latin cognatus “of common descent,” from com- “together” (see co-) + gnatus, past participle of gnasci, older form of nasci “to be born” (see genus). Words that are cognates are cousins, not siblings. As a noun, from 1754.
cog v. Ods.
From contextual evidence it would seem that ‘cogging’ generally designated some sleight of hand, made use of to control the falling of a die; occasionally it may mean the substitution of a false die for the true one. The notion that it meant ‘to load the dice’ appears to be a mistake of modern dictionaries, which has, however, strongly influenced the use of the word by modern novelists…


code n.
b. A systematic collection or digest of the laws of a country, or of those relating to a particular subject.
a. A system or collection of rules or regulations on any subject.
b. Telegr. A system of words arbitrarily used for other words or for phrases, to secure brevity and secrecy; also attrib., as in code telegram, code word.


diction n.
1540s, “a word;” 1580s, “expression of ideas in words,” from Late Latin dictionem (nominative dictio) “a saying, expression, word,” noun of action from dic-, past participle stem of Latin dicere “speak, tell, say” (source of French dire “to say”), related to dicare “proclaim, dedicate,” from PIE root *deik- “to point out” (cognates: Sanskrit dic- “point out, show,” Greek deiknynai “to show, to prove,” Latin digitus “finger,” Old High German zeigon, German zeigen “to show,” Old English teon “to accuse,” tæcan “to teach”).

Another cognate is Greek dike “custom, usage,” and, via the notion of “right as dependent on custom,” “law, a right; a judgment; a lawsuit, court case, trial; penalty awarded by a judge.”


Forgery bond
Corporate Suretyship .pdf by G. W. Crist, Jr. McGraw-Hill, 1939.
https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/crist_forgery_bonds.jpg


A right royal Birth certificate
https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/royal_birth_certif.jpg?w=840
The Royals themselves may not whats going on with this document. But the Registra sure as shit did.

2014 show 270 dec 10

If in this life we only have hope “in Paper We Trust!” We are of all men most miserable Owe no man any thing, but to love one another: for he that loveth another hath fulfilled the law.

Directly download mp3


Tonight’s topic among others: The site referenced by Clint at the start of the show is: bibleversusconstitution.org and;


1 Corinthians 15 Kjv
18 Then they also which are fallen asleep in Christ are perished.
19 If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men most miserable.


… society which makes freedom its primary goal will lose it, because it has made, not responsibility, but freedom from responsibility, its purpose. When freedom is the basic emphasis, it is not responsible speech which is fostered but irresponsible speech. If freedom of press is absolutized, libel will be defended finally as a privilege of freedom, and if free speech is absolutized, slander finally becomes a right. Religious liberty becomes a triumph of irreligion. Tyranny and anarchy take over. Freedom of speech, press, and religion all give way to controls, totalitarian controls. The goal must be God’s law-order, in which alone is true liberty.

Whenever freedom is made into the absolute, the result is not freedom but anarchism. Freedom must be under law, or it is not freedom…. Only a law-order which holds to the primacy of God’s law can bring forth true freedom, freedom for justice, truth, and godly life. Freedom as an absolute is simply an assertion of man’s “right” to be his own god; this means a radical denial of God’s law-order. “Freedom” thus is another name for the claim by man to divinity and autonomy. It means that man becomes his own absolute

Rousas John Rushdoony, The Institutes of Biblical Law (The Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing Company, 1973) p. 581, 583


2419d2ee1929845f1b1df4192f92cd89 Pete The Dog


1 Corinthians 15 Kjv
18 Then they also which are fallen asleep in Christ are perished.
19 If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men most miserable.


Remedy n. Latin remedium; re and medeor, to heal.
1. That which cures a disease; any medicine or application which puts an end to disease and restores health; with for; as a remedy for the gout.
2. That which counteracts an evil of any kind; with for, to or against; usually with for. Civil government is the remedy for the evils of natural liberty. What remedy can be provided for extravagance in dress? The man who shall invent an effectual remedy for intemperance, will deserve every thing from his fellow men.


Imprinting participle present tense Marking by pressure; printing; fixing on the mind or memory.


Compound v. transitive
1. To mix or unite two or more ingredients in one mass or body; as, to compound drugs.


death n.
In theology, perpetual separation from God, and eternal torments; called the second death.
Separation or alienation of the soul from God; a being under the dominion of sin, and destitute of grace or divine life; called spiritual death.
Civil death is the separation of a man from civil society, or from the enjoyment of civil rights; as by banishment, abjuration of the realm, entering into a monastery, etc.

Revelation 2Kjv
11 He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the churches; He that overcometh shall not be hurt of the second death.


Ohio Judge Tells Man He’s Still Legally Dead


Crucifixion. Hans von Tübingen, 1430
Crucifixion. Hans von Tübingen, 1430

Luke 23 Kjv
39 And one of the malefactors which were hanged railed on him, saying, If thou be Christ, save thyself and us.

40 But the other answering rebuked him, saying, Dost not thou fear God, seeing thou art in the same condemnation?

41 And we indeed justly; for we receive the due reward of our deeds: but this man hath done nothing amiss.

42 And he said unto Jesus, Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy kingdom.

43 And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, Today shalt thou be with me in paradise.

44 And it was about the sixth hour, and there was a darkness over all the earth until the ninth hour.

45 And the sun was darkened, and the veil of the temple was rent in the midst.

46 And when Jesus had cried with a loud voice, he said, Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit: and having said thus, he gave up the ghost.


Deem v. transitive
1. To think; to judge; to be of opinion; to conclude on consideration; as, he deems it prudent to be silent.
For never can I deem him less than god.
2. To estimate.
Deem, noun Opinion; judgment; surmise.
Deeming participle present tense Thinking; judging; believing.


Physicians’ handbook on birth and death registration, containing International list of causes of death. Halbert L Dunn : Publisher: Washington, 1939.

Informant
The informant, preferably the mother (or the father or another adult having knowledge of the personal facts concerning the birth), is responsible for providing the legal facts (for example, parents’ names) and signing the birth certificate to certify that the information is correct. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/misc/hb_birth .pdf


Doomsday Clock wiki


Timocracy n. Gr. honor, worth, and to hold.
Government by men of property, who are possessed of a certain income.


Quandary n. v.
Doubt; uncertainty; a state of difficulty or perplexity.
To bring into a state of uncertainty or difficulty ods


In Paper We Trust?
Two strands among others have been discernible in U. S. History. The first can be called “in the Constitution we trust,” or, “In paper we trust,” and the second, “in God we trust.
Where written documents give a total prescription for the life and mind of the members, there is no place given for the work of the Spirit
Instead of room for growth being assumed, the rules demand instant maturity, and they result instead in acquiescence and no growth: submission replaced maturation

By Rev. R.J. Rushdoony : 1991 Chalcedon Report, No. 307


Tally Stick

The Babylonian Woe by David Astle 1975 on Amazon

The Babylonian Woe by David Astle 1975 on youtube Spoken word.

The Babylonian Woe by David Astle 1975 The Babylonian Woe .pdf


1 Chronicles 4:33 Kjv
And all their villages that were round about the same cities, unto Baal. These were their habitations, and their genealogy.

Nehemiah 7:64 Kjv
These sought their register among those that were reckoned by genealogy, but it was not found: therefore were they, as polluted, put from the priesthood.


Romans 13:8 Kjv
8 Owe no man any thing, but to love one another: for he that loveth another hath fulfilled the law.
9 For this, Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not kill, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness, Thou shalt not covet; and if there be any other commandment, it is briefly comprehended in this saying, namely, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
10 Love worketh no ill to his neighbour: therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.


Galatians 6 Kjv
3 For if a man think himself to be something, when he is nothing, he deceiveth himself.


article n.
2. A separate clause or provision of a statute, constitution, code, etc., typically one outlining a single regulation; an act; a rule. Formerly also: †a separate point in a request or petition (obs.).
a. article of faith: a fundamental tenet or belief of a particular religion or denomination, spec. any of the items in a formal summary of faith; (hence, in pl.) a summary of faith, a creed; also in extended use.


The Thirteen Articles .pdf

  1. The Unity of God and the Trinity of Persons
    Concerning the Unity of the Divine Being and the Three Persons, we hold the decree of the Council of Nicaea to be true and without any doubt to be believed, viz, that there is one divine essence which is both called and is God. eternal. incorporeal. indivisible. of immense oower wisdom and goodness …

The Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion Church of England

Article I: Of Faith in the Holy Trinity
There is but one living and true God, everlasting, without body, parts, or passions; of infinite power, wisdom, and goodness; the Maker, and Preserver of all things both visible and invisible. And in unity of this Godhead there be three Persons, of one substance, power, and eternity; the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost…

Article III: Of the going down of Christ into Hell
As Christ died for us, and was buried, so also is it to be believed, that he went down into Hell.

Article IV: Of the Resurrection of Christ
Christ did truly rise again from death, and took again his body, with flesh, bones, and all things appertaining to the perfection of Man’s nature; wherewith he ascended into Heaven, and there sitteth, until he return to judge all Men at the last day.

Resurrection_Raffaelino_del_Garbo_1510
The Resurrection of Our Lord – Easter Day – Raffaelino del Garbo 1510

Article V: Of the Holy Ghost
The Holy Ghost, proceeding from the Father and the Son, is of one substance, majesty, and glory, with the Father and the Son, very and eternal God…

Thirty-nine Articles plural n.
a set of formulas defining the doctrinal position of the Church of England, drawn up in the 16th century, to which the clergy are required to give general consent.

The Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion are the historically defining statements of doctrines of the Church of England with respect to the controversies of the English Reformation. Wiki

2014 show 265 dec 03

Daniel’s playing with ignis not the fraudulent suppression of facts, but the eater of them and; He who puts his hand therein receives no injury and the Unholy Church.

Directly download mp3


Tonight’s topic among others: Adults and their Toys, Life in our Bio-metric Prison! Cloning animals and cattle, they have your DNA.


technology n.
1610s, “a discourse or treatise on an art or the arts,” from Greek tekhnologia “systematic treatment of an art, craft, or technique,” originally referring to grammar, from tekhno- (see techno-) + -logy. The meaning “study of mechanical and industrial arts” (Century Dictionary, 1902, gives examples of “spinning, metal-working, or brewing”) is first recorded 1859. High technology attested from 1964; short form high-tech is from 1972.
logy
word-forming element meaning “a speaking, discourse, treatise, doctrine, theory, science,” from Greek -logia (often via French -logie or Medieval Latin -logia), from root of legein “to speak;” thus, “the character or deportment of one who speaks or treats of (a certain subject);” see lecture n.


human adj.
mid-15c., humain, humaigne, “human,” from Old French humain, umain (adj.) “of or belonging to man” (12c.), from Latin humanus “of man, human,” also “humane, philanthropic, kind, gentle, polite; learned, refined, civilized.” This is in part from PIE *(dh)ghomon-, literally “earthling, earthly being,” as opposed to the gods (see homunculus). Compare Hebrew adam “man,” from adamah “ground.” Cognate with Old Lithuanian zmuo (accusative zmuni) “man, male person.”
Human interest is from 1824. Human rights attested by 1680s; human being by 1690s. Human relations is from 1916; human resources attested by 1907, American English, apparently originally among social Christians and based on natural resources.
homunculus n.
“tiny human being produced artificially,” 1650s, from Latin homunculus (plural homunculi), literally “little person,” with -culus, diminutive suffix, + homo (genitive hominis), which technically meant “male human,” but it also was used with a sense “the human race, mankind;” while in Vulgar Latin it could be used as “one, anyone, they, people” and in logical and scholastic writing as “a human being, person.” This is conjectured to be perhaps from PIE *(dh)ghomon-, literally “earthling,” from *dhghem- “earth” (see chthonic; also compare human). Other Latin diminutives from homo included homullus, homuncio.


scienter n.
A. n. Law.
The fact that an act was done with knowledge of the probable consequences, esp. when this constitutes a ground for civil damages or criminal punishment. Freq. in to prove (a) scienter: to prove that an act was done knowingly.
Often used in relation to the liability of the owner of an animal known to be dangerous for injury or damage caused by that animal
B. adv. Chiefly Law. Knowingly.
1673 W. Lucy Answer to Hobbs his Leviathan ii. xxiii. 199 To understand this know that he who obeys Gods commands, must do it as a man scienter knowingly.
1683 J. Dalrymple Decisions Lords of Council & Session I. 205 Being done by the Testator scienter, who cannot be presumed, to be ignorant of his own Assignation, lately made before.


He who consents cannot receive an injury
One who wills a thing to be or to be done cannot complain of that thing as an injury
The government cannot confer a favor which occasions injury and loss to others.


subreption n.
“act of obtaining a favor by fraudulent suppression of facts,” c. 1600, from Latin subreptionem (nominative subreptio), noun of action from past participle stem of subripere, surripere (see surreptitious). Related: Subreptitious.
a. Ecclesiastical Law. Suppression of the truth or concealment of facts in order to obtain a dispensation, etc.Contrasted with
obreption n.
The action of obtaining or trying to obtain something by fraud; an attempt to do this; spec. (a) Ecclesiastical Law the obtaining of a dispensation, etc., by false statement; (b) Sc. Law the obtaining of gifts of escheat, etc., by means of falsehood. Cf. subreption n.
escheat n.
a. An ‘incident’ of feudal law, whereby a fief reverted to the lord when the tenant died without leaving a successor qualified to inherit under the original grant. Hence, the lapsing of land to the Crown (in U.S., to the state), or to the lord of the manor, on the death of the owner intestate without heirs.As an attainted person, according to the doctrine of ‘corruption of blood’ (see attainder n.), could have no legal heir, his property suffered escheat. This ‘escheat by corruption of blood’, theoretically distinct from the ‘forfeiture’ inflicted as a penalty for treason and felony, was abolished together with the latter by the Felony Act, 1870.


signature analysis


Confirmation. Giuseppe Maria Crespi.
Confirmation. Giuseppe Maria Crespi, oil on canvas, H:125 cm W: 93cm 1712

conformation n.
1510s, from Latin conformationem (nominative conformatio) “a symmetrical forming,” noun of action from past participle stem of conformare (see conform).

Where the Bishop is, there let the multitude of believers be; even as where Jesus is, there is the Catholic Church
Ignatius of Antioch, 1st c. A.D


article n.
2. A separate clause or provision of a statute, constitution, code, etc., typically one outlining a single regulation; an act; a rule. Formerly also: †a separate point in a request or petition (obs.).
a. article of faith: a fundamental tenet or belief of a particular religion or denomination, spec. any of the items in a formal summary of faith; (hence, in pl.) a summary of faith, a creed; also in extended use.


The Thirteen Articles .pdf

  1. The Unity of God and the Trinity of Persons
    Concerning the Unity of the Divine Being and the Three Persons, we hold the decree of the Council of Nicaea to be true and without any doubt to be believed, viz, that there is one divine essence which is both called and is God. eternal. incorporeal. indivisible. of immense oower wisdom and goodness.
    Creator and Preserver of all things visible and invisible, and yet there are three Persons of the same essence and power, coeternal, Father. The Thirteen Articles Son and Holy Spirit; and we call each person by the same name and with the same meaning as used by the Church Fathers, i.e. as signifying not a part or a quality in another being, but as subsisting in themselves.
    We condemn all the heresies which have arisen against this article, e.g. the Manichees, who posited two principles, one good and one bad; likewise the Arians, Eunomians, Muslims and all like them. We also condemn the Adoptionists, ancient and modern, who argue that there is only one person and cleverly and impiously prate that the Word and the Holy Spirit are not distinct persons, but that the Word is just a verbal utterance and the Spirit just a movement created in things.

The Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion Church of England

Article I: Of Faith in the Holy Trinity
There is but one living and true God, everlasting, without body, parts, or passions; of infinite power, wisdom, and goodness; the Maker, and Preserver of all things both visible and invisible. And in unity of this Godhead there be three Persons, of one substance, power, and eternity; the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.

Article II: Of the Word or Son of God, which was made very Man
The Son, which is the Word of the Father, begotten from everlasting of the Father, the very and eternal God, and of one substance with the Father, took Man’s nature in the womb of the blessed Virgin, of her substance: so that two whole and perfect Natures, that is to say, the Godhead and Manhood, were joined together in one Person, never to be divided, whereof is one Christ, very God, and very Man; who truly suffered, was crucified, dead, and buried, to reconcile His Father to us, and to be a sacrifice, not only for original guilt, but also for all actual sins of men.

Article III: Of the going down of Christ into Hell
As Christ died for us, and was buried, so also is it to be believed, that he went down into Hell.

Article IV: Of the Resurrection of Christ
Christ did truly rise again from death, and took again his body, with flesh, bones, and all things appertaining to the perfection of Man’s nature; wherewith he ascended into Heaven, and there sitteth, until he return to judge all Men at the last day.

Resurrection_Raffaelino_del_Garbo_1510
The Resurrection of Our Lord – Easter Day – Raffaelino del Garbo 1510

Article V: Of the Holy Ghost
The Holy Ghost, proceeding from the Father and the Son, is of one substance, majesty, and glory, with the Father and the Son, very and eternal God…

Thirty-nine Articles plural n.
a set of formulas defining the doctrinal position of the Church of England, drawn up in the 16th century, to which the clergy are required to give general consent.

The Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion are the historically defining statements of doctrines of the Church of England with respect to the controversies of the English Reformation. Wiki


subscription n.
c. 1400, “piece of writing at the end of a document,” from Middle French subscription (Modern French souscription) and directly from Latin subscriptionem (nominative subscriptio) “anything written underneath, a signature,” noun of action from past participle stem of subscribere (see subscribe). Meaning “act of subscribing money” is from 1640s.


It is like a surname: if the name is “I am Christian,” the surname is “I belong to the Church.”
We are not isolated and we are not Christians as individuals, each one on his own. No. Our Christian identity is belonging! We are Christians because we belong to the Church. It is like a surname: if the name is I am Christian, the surname is I belong to the Church. It is beautiful to note how this belonging is expressed also in the name that God attributes to Himself. Responding to Moses, in the wonderful episode of the burning bush (cf. Exodus 3:15), He describes Himself, in fact, as the God of the Fathers. He does not say: I am Omnipotent …, no: I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob. In this way, he calls us to enter into this relation that precedes us. God’s relation with His people precedes us all, it comes from that time. audience address on belonging to the church
Also mentioned in 2014 show 258 nov 19


SPIRITUAL adj.
1. Consisting of spirit; not material; incorporeal; as a spiritual substance or being. The soul of man is spiritual
2. Mental; intellectual; as spiritual armor.
3. Not gross; refined from external things; not sensual; relative to mind only; as a spiritual and refined religion.
4. Not lay or temporal; relating to sacred things; ecclesiastical; as the spiritual functions of the clergy; the lords spiritual and temporal; a spiritual corporation.
5. Pertaining to spirit or to the affections; pure; holy.
Gods law is spiritual; it is a transcript of the divine nature, and extends its authority to the acts of the soul of man.
6. Pertaining to the renewed nature of man; as spiritual life.
7. Not fleshly; not material; as spiritual sacrifices. 1 Peter 2:5.
8. Pertaining to divine things; as spiritual songs. Ephesians 5:19.
SPIRITUAL court, an ecclesiastical court; a court held by a bishop or other ecclesiastic. Websters1828


Incorporate v. adj.
1. Not consisting of matter; not having a material body. Obs.
2. Mixed; united in one body; associated.
The idolaters, who worshiped their images as gods, supposed some spirit to be incorporated therein.
6. To form into a legal body, or body politic; to constitute a body, composed of one or more individuals, with the quality of perpetual existence or succession, unless limited by the act of incorporation; as, to incorporate the inhabitants of a city, town or parish; to incorporate the proprietors of a bridge, the stockholders of a bank, of an insurance company, etc. New Haven was incorporated in January 1784; Hartford in May 1784.


request v.
1530s, from request (n.) or from Middle French requester, from Old French requester “ask again, request, reclaim,” from requeste. Related: Requested; requesting.
request n.
mid-14c., from Old French requeste (Modern French requête) “a request,” from Vulgar Latin *requaesita, from Latin requisita “a thing asked for,” fem. of requisitus “requested, demanded,” from past participle stem of requirere (see require).


solicit v.
early 15c., “to disturb, trouble,” from Middle French soliciter (14c.), from Latin sollicitare “to disturb, rouse, trouble, harass; stimulate, provoke,” from sollicitus “agitated,” from sollus “whole, entire” + citus “aroused,” past participle of ciere “shake, excite, set in motion” (see cite). Related: Solicited; soliciting.

Meaning “entreat, petition” is from 1520s. Meaning “to further (business affairs)” evolved mid-15c. from Middle French sense of “manage affairs.” The sexual sense (often in reference to prostitutes) is attested from 1710, probably from a merger of the business sense and an earlier sense of “to court or beg the favor of” (a woman), attested from 1590s.


Ephesians 6:12 Kjv
12 For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.


rescission n.
1610s, “action of cutting off;” 1650s, “action of annulling,” from Late Latin rescissionem (nominative rescisio) “annulment,” noun of action from past participle stem of rescindere “to cut off; abolish” (see rescind).
recision n.
“act of cutting off,” 1610s, from Middle French recision, alteration of rescision (from Late Latin rescissionem “annulment;” see rescission), influenced in form by Late Latin recisionem (nominative recisio) “a cutting back,” noun of action from past participle stem of recidere “to cut back” (see recidivist).
rescind v.
1630s, from French rescinder “cut off, cancel” (15c.), and directly from Latin rescindere “to cut off, tear off, abolish,” from re- “back” (see re-) + scindere “to cut, split” (see shed (v.)). Related: Rescinded; rescinding.
cide
word-forming element meaning “killer,” from French –cide, from Latin -cida “cutter, killer, slayer,” from -cidere, comb. form of caedere “to strike down, chop, beat, hew, fell, slay,” from PIE *kae-id-, from root *(s)k(h)ai- “to strike” (Pokorny, not in Watkins; cognates: Sanskrit skhidati “beats, tears,” Lithuanian kaisti “shave,” German heien “beat”). For Latin vowel change, see acquisition. The element also can represent “killing,” from French –cide, from Latin -cidium “a cutting, a killing.”


Carry on Henry Continues to provide perfect examples of how/why the World is the way it is. File under Divorce.