2015 show 310 feb 11

Anthropomorphism was considered to be a Heresy.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Anthropomorphism .. The History and Practice of! Anthropomorphism was considered to be a Heresy,

in Biblical Times. History, Story Telling.. all to Personify (The Creation of Persons)! That is what Government, and Religion Do! Religion Personifies God, and only “They” can Absolve Your Sins!


anthropomorphite n. mid-15c.; see anthropomorphite + -ist.
The sect of Antropomorfitis, whiche helden that God in his godhede hath hondis and feet and othere suche membris. [Reginald Pecock, “The Repressor of Over Much Blaming of the Clergy,” 1449]
Related: Anthropomorphitism (1660s).

personification n.
1755, noun of action from personify. Sense of “embodiment of a quality in a person” is attested from 1807.

personify v.
1727 “to attribute personal form to things or abstractions” (especially as an artistic or literary technique), from person + -fy or from French personnifier (17c.), from personne. Meaning “to represent, embody” attested from 1806. Related: Personified; personifying.


religion v.
c. 1200, “state of life bound by monastic vows,” also “conduct indicating a belief in a divine power,” from Anglo-French religiun (11c.), Old French religion “piety, devotion; religious community,” and directly from Latin religionem (nominative religio) “respect for what is sacred, reverence for the gods; conscientiousness, sense of right, moral obligation; fear of the gods; divine service, religious observance; a religion, a faith, a mode of worship, cult; sanctity, holiness,” in Late Latin “monastic life” (5c.).

According to Cicero derived from relegere “go through again” (in reading or in thought), from re- “again” (see re-) + legere “read” (see lecture (n.)). However, popular etymology among the later ancients (Servius, Lactantius, Augustine) and the interpretation of many modern writers connects it with religare “to bind fast” (see rely), via notion of “place an obligation on,” or “bond between humans and gods.” In that case, the re- would be intensive. Another possible origin is religiens “careful,” opposite of negligens. In English, meaning “particular system of faith” is recorded from c. 1300; sense of “recognition of and allegiance in manner of life (perceived as justly due) to a higher, unseen power or powers” is from 1530s.

To hold, therefore, that there is no difference in matters of religion between forms that are unlike each other, and even contrary to each other, most clearly leads in the end to the rejection of all religion in both theory and practice. And this is the same thing as atheism, however it may differ from it in name. [Pope Leo XIII, Immortale Dei, 1885]

re
word-forming element meaning “back to the original place; again, anew, once more,” also with a sense of “undoing,” c. 1200, from Old French and directly from Latin re- “again, back, anew, against,” “Latin combining form conceivably from Indo-European *wret-, metathetical variant of *wert- “to turn” [Watkins]. Often merely intensive, and in many of the older borrowings from French and Latin the precise sense of re- is lost in secondary senses or weakened beyond recognition. OED writes that it is “impossible to attempt a complete record of all the forms resulting from its use,” and adds that “The number of these is practically infinite ….” The Latin prefix became red- before vowels and h-, as in redact, redeem, redolent, redundant.

legion n.
c. 1200, from Old French legion “Roman legion” (3,000 to 6,000 men, under Marius usually with attached cavalry), from Latin legionem (nominative legio) “body of soldiers,” from legere “to choose, gather,” also “to read” (see lecture (n.)).

Generalized sense of “a large number” is due to translations of allusive phrase in Mark v:9. American Legion, U.S. association of ex-servicemen, founded in 1919. Legion of Honor is French légion d’honneur, an order of distinction founded by Napoleon in 1802. Foreign Legion is French légion étrangère “body of foreign volunteers in a modern army,” originally Polish, Belgian, etc. units in French army; they traditionally served in colonies or distant expeditions.

leg n.
late 13c., from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse leggr “leg, bone of the arm or leg,” from Proto-Germanic *lagjaz, with no certain ulterior connections, perhaps from a PIE root meaning “to bend” [Buck]. Compare German Bein “leg,” in Old High German “bone, leg.” Replaced Old English shank. Of furniture supports from 1670s. The meaning “a part or stage of a journey or race” (1920) is from earlier sailing sense of “a run made on a single tack” (1867), which was usually qualified as long leg, short leg, etc. Slang phrase shake a leg “dance” is attested from 1881. To be on (one’s) last legs “at the end of one’s life” is from 1590s.

ligo, ligare, ligavi, ligatus bind, tie, fasten, unite

legio, legionis army, legion

Re
leg-iron n. a shackle or fetter for the leg (whence leg-ironed adj.).


money n.s mid-13c., “coinage, metal currency,” from Old French monoie “money, coin, currency; change” (Modern French monnaie), from Latin moneta “place for coining money, mint; coined money, money, coinage,” from Moneta, a title or surname of the Roman goddess Juno, in or near whose temple money was coined; perhaps from monere “advise, warn” (see monitor n., with the sense of “admonishing goddess,” which is sensible, but the etymology is difficult. Extended early 19c. to include paper money.

As Juno Moneta (“the Warner”), she had a temple on the Arx (the northern summit of the Capitoline Hill) from 344 bc; it later housed the Roman mint, and the words “mint” and “money” derive from the name.
In God We Trust

Matthew 6:24 Kjv
No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon

3126 mammonas mam-mo-nas’ of Chaldee origin (confidence, i.e. wealth, personified); mammonas, i.e. avarice (deified):–mammon.
Strong’s Greek Bible Dictionary

Nail n. [nœᵹl, Saxon; nagel, German.]
A spike of metal by which things are fastened together.
On the nail. Readily; immediately; without delay. I suppose from a counter studded with nails.

We want our money on the nail, The banker’s ruin’d if he pays. Swift’s Poems.


invent v.
c. 1500, “to find, discover” (obsolete), a back-formation from invention or else from Latin inventus, past participle of invenire “to come upon; devise, discover.” General sense of “make up, fabricate, concoct, devise” (a plot, excuse, etc.) is from 1530s, as is that of “produce by original thought, find out by original study or contrivance.” Related: Invented; inventing.


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