2014 show 112 april 02

Forgive to us our debts, as we forgive to our debtors and the Super Sonic Fraudsters for the Pagan Universal Church

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Tonight’s topic among others: Matthew 6 and the Super Sonic Fraudsters for the Pope and;


Matthew 6 Wyc
9 And thus ye shall pray, Our Father that art in heavens, hallowed be thy name;
10 thy kingdom come to; be thy will done in earth as it is in heaven;
11 give to us this day our each day’s bread;
2 and forgive to us our debts, as we forgive to our debtors;
13 and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.
24 No man may serve two lords, for either he shall hate the one, and love the other; either he shall sustain the one [or he shall sustain the one], and despise the other. Ye be not able to serve God and riches.


Jean Baudrillard – Simulacra and Simulation .pdf


bill n. ancient weapon, Old English bill “sword (especially one with a hooked blade), chopping tool,” common Germanic (compare Old Saxon bil “sword,” Middle Dutch bile, Dutch bijl, Old High German bihal, German Beil, Old Norse bilda “hatchet.”…
bill n.written statement,” mid-14c., from Anglo-French bille, Anglo-Latin billa “list,” from Medieval Latin bulla “decree, seal, sealed document,” in classical Latin “bubble, boss, stud, amulet for the neck” (hence “seal;” see bull (n.2)). Sense of “account, invoice” first recorded c. 1400; that of “order to pay” (technically bill of exchange) is from 1570s; that of “paper money” is from 1660s. Meaning “draft of an act of Parliament” is from 1510s.

be v. Old English beon, beom, bion “be, exist, come to be, become, happen,” from Proto-Germanic *biju- “I am, I will be.” This “b-root” is from PIE root *bheue- “to be, exist, grow, come into being,” and in addition to the words in English it yielded German present first and second person singular (bin, bist, from Old High German bim “I am,” bist “thou art”), Latin perfective tenses of esse (fui “I was,” etc.), Old Church Slavonic byti “be,” Greek phu- “become,” Old Irish bi’u “I am,” Lithuanian bu’ti “to be,” Russian byt’ “to be,” etc. It also is behind Sanskrit bhavah “becoming,” bhavati “becomes, happens,” bhumih “earth, world.”
ill adj. c. 1200, “wickedly; with hostility,” from ill (adj.). Meaning “not well, poorly” is from c. 1300. It generally has not shifted to the realm of physical sickess, as the adjective has done. Ill-fated recorded from 1710; ill-informed from 1824; ill-tempered from c. 1600; ill-starred from c. 1600. Generally contrasted with well, hence the useful, but now obsolete or obscure illcome (1570s), illfare (c. 1300), and illth.
ill adj. c. 1200, “morally evil; offensive, objectionable” (other 13c. senses were “malevolent, hurtful, unfortunate, difficult”), from Old Norse illr “evil, bad; hard, difficult; mean, stingy,” a word of unknown origin. Not considered to be related to evil. From mid-14c. as “marked by evil intentions; harmful, pernicious.” Sense of “sick, unhealthy, diseased, unwell” is first recorded mid-15c., probably from a use similar to that in the Old Norse idiom “it is bad to me.” Slang inverted sense of “very good, cool” is 1980s. As a noun, “something evil,” from mid-13c.
ill v. early 13c., “do evil to,” from ill (adj.). Meaning “speak disparagingly” is from 1520s. Related: Illed; illing.


synonym n. “word having the same sense as another,” early 15c. (but usually in plural form before 18c., or, if singular, as synonyma), from Old French synonyme (12c.) and directly from Late Latin synonymum, from Greek synonymon “word having the same sense as another,” noun use of neuter of synonymos “having the same name as, synonymous,” from syn- “together, same” (see syn-) + onyma, Aeolic dialectal form of onoma “name” (see name n.).


Luke 11:52 Kjv
52 Woe unto you, lawyers! for ye have taken away the key of knowledge: ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in ye hindered.

Luke 11:52 Wyc
52 Woe to you, wise men of the law, for ye have taken away the key of knowing; and ye yourselves entered not, and ye have forbidden them that entered.


James 5 Wyc
1 Do now, ye rich men, weep ye, yelling in your wretchednesses that shall come to you.
2 Your riches be rotten, and your clothes be eaten of moths.
3 Your gold and silver hath rusted, and the rust of them shall be to you into witnessing, and shall eat your fleshes, as fire. Ye have treasured to you wrath in the last days.
4 Lo! the hire of your workmen, that reaped your fields, which is defrauded of you [which is frauded of you], crieth; and the cry of them hath entered into the ears of the Lord of hosts.
5 Ye have eaten on the earth, and in your lecheries ye have nourished your hearts. In the day of slaying


Leviticus 6:4 Wyc
if it is convicted of the guilt, he shall yield whole all things which he would get by fraud, (if he is convicted, and found guilty, he shall give back whole everything which he hath gotten by fraud,)
Joshua 9:22
Joshua called (for the) Gibeonites, and said to them, Why would ye deceive us by fraud, (so) that ye said, We dwell full far from you, since ye be in the midst of us? (We live far away from you, when truly ye live right here in the midst of us?)
Judges 11:9
And Jephthah said to them, Whether ye came verily, or without fraud, to me, that I fight for you against the sons of Ammon, and if the Lord shall betake them into mine hands, shall I be your prince?
Proverbs 24:2
For the soul of them bethinketh (on) ravens, and their lips speak frauds.


impersonation n. 1800, “personification;” 1825 as “an acting of a part or character;” noun of action from impersonate v.


fee n. Middle English, representing the merger or mutual influence of two words, one from Old English, one from an Old French form of the same Germanic word, and both ultimately from a PIE root meaning “cattle.”

The Old English word is feoh “livestock, cattle; movable property; possessions in livestock, goods, or money; riches, treasure, wealth; money as a medium of exchange or payment,” from Proto-Germanic *fehu- (cognates: Old Saxon fehu, Old High German fihu, German Vieh “cattle,” Gothic faihu “money, fortune”). This is from PIE *peku- “cattle” (cognates: Sanskrit pasu, Lithuanian pekus “cattle;” Latin pecu “cattle,” pecunia “money, property”).

The other word is Anglo-French fee, from Old French fieu, a variant of fief “possession, holding, domain; feudal duties, payment” (see fief ), which apparently is a Germanic compound in which the first element is cognate with Old English feoh.

Via Anglo-French come the legal senses “estate in land or tenements held on condition of feudal homage; land, property, possession” (c. 1300). Hence fee-simple (late 14c.) “absolute ownership,” as opposed to fee-tail (early 15c.) “entailed ownership,” inheritance limited to some particular class of heirs (second element from Old French taillir “to cut, to limit”).

The feudal sense was extended from landholdings to inheritable offices of service to a feudal lord (late 14c.; in Anglo-French late 13c.), for example forester of fe “a forester by heritable right.” As these often were offices of profit, the word came to be used for “remuneration for service in office” (late 14c.), hence, “payment for (any kind of) work or services” (late 14c.). From late 14c. as “a sum paid for a privilege” (originally admission to a guild); early 15c. as “money payment or charge exacted for a license, etc.”


Colossians 2
13 And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses;
14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;
15 And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it.

2014 show 108 march 26

Native inhabitants and talk about the surname

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Tonight’s topic among others: Clint is ill, Native inhabitants and talk about the surname and;


childhood n.
Old English cild “fetus, infant, unborn or newly born person,” from Proto-Germanic *kiltham (cognates: Gothic kilþei “womb,” inkilþo “pregnant;” Danish kuld “children of the same marriage;” Old Swedish kulder “litter;” Old English cildhama “womb,” lit. “child-home”); no certain cognates outside Germanic. “App[arently] originally always used in relation to the mother as the ‘fruit of the womb'” [Buck]. Also in late Old English, “a youth of gentle birth” (archaic, usually written childe). In 16c.-17c. especially “girl child.”

The wider sense “young person before the onset of puberty” developed in late Old English. Phrase with child “pregnant” (late 12c.) retains the original sense. The sense extension from “infant” to “child” also is found in French enfant, Latin infans. Meaning “one’s own child; offspring of parents” is from late 12c. (the Old English word was bearn; see bairn). Figurative use from late 14c. Most Indo-European languages use the same word for “a child” and “one’s child,” though there are exceptions (such as Latin liberi/pueri).

The difficulty with the plural began in Old English, where the nominative plural was at first cild, identical with the singular, then c.975 a plural form cildru (genitive cildra) arose, probably for clarity’s sake, only to be re-pluraled late 12c. as children, which is thus a double plural. Middle English plural cildre survives in Lancashire dialect childer and in Childermas.

An infant n.
Forms: Also ME fant, fawnt.
Etymology: Aphetic form of Old French enfaunt, enfant:

faunt n.
1382 Bible (Wycliffite, E.V.) Lev. xii. 3 The eiȝt day the fawnt shal be circumcidid Odj.

C. The lnitlial letter or the word’ Codex.’
used by Bome ‘Writers in ciling the Code of justinian. Tay!. Civil Law, 24.
It was also the letter inscribed on the bal­lots by which, among the Romans, jurors
voted to condemn an accused party.
It was the initial letter of condemno, I condemn.
Tay!. Civil Law. 192

hild v. Obs. Trans.
a. To flay, skin.
b. To strip off (the skin).

chi n.
22nd letter of the Greek alphabet, representing a –kh– sound (see ch). The letter is shaped like an X, and so the Greek letter name was used figuratively to signify such a shape or arrangement (as in khiasma “two things placed crosswise;” khiastos “arranged diagonally; marked with an X;” khiazein “to mark with an ‘X’, to write the letter ‘X'”). Some dialects used chi to represent the -ks- sound properly belonging to xi; Latin picked this up and the sound value of chi in Latin-derived alphabets is now that of English X.
chiasma n.
“a crossing,” 1832, medical Latin, from Greek khiasma “two things placed crosswise,” which is related to khiasmos (see chiasmus). In cytology from 1911.
chiasmus n.
in grammar, inversion of word order, 1871, Latinized from Greek khiasmos “a placing crosswise, diagonal arrangement” (see chi).

Adam, first of men,
To first of women, Eve
.
[“Paradise Lost”]

X
The entire entry for X in Johnson’s dictionary (1756) is: “X is a letter, which, though found in Saxon words, begins no word in the English language.” Most English words beginning in -x- are of Greek origin or modern commercial coinages. East Anglian in 14c. showed a tendency to use -x- for initial sh-, sch- (such as xal for shall), which didn’t catch on but seems an improvement over the current system. As a symbol of a kiss on a letter, etc., it is recorded from 1765. In malt liquor, XX denoted “double quality” and XXX “strongest quality” (1827).

Algebraic meaning “unknown quantity” (1660 in English, from French), sometimes is said to be from medieval use, originally a crossed -r-, in that case probably from Latin radix (see root n.). Other theories trace it to Arabic (Klein), but a more prosaic explanation says Descartes (1637) took x, y, z, the last three letters of the alphabet, for unknowns to correspond to a, b, c, used for known quantities.

Used allusively for “unknown person” from 1797, “something unknown” since 1859. As a type of chromosome, attested from 1902 (first so called in German; Henking, 1891). To designate “films deemed suitable for adults only,” first used 1950 in Britain; adopted in U.S. Nov. 1, 1968. The XYZ Affair in American history (1797) involved French agents designated by those letters.

ild An obsolete dialectal form of yield. It occurs in the phrase God ild, for God yield. See under God.

yield n.
Old English gield “payment, sum of money; service, offering, worship;” from the source of yield v.. Extended sense of “production” (as of crops) is first attested mid-15c. Earliest English sense survives in financial “yield from investments.”

hood
word-forming element meaning “state or condition of being,” from Old English -had “condition, quality, position” (as in cildhad “childhood,” preosthad “priesthood,” werhad “manhood”), cognate with German -heit/-keit, Dutch -heid, Old Frisian and Old Saxon -hed, all from Proto-Germanic *haidus “manner, quality,” literally “bright appearance,” from PIE (s)kai- (1) “bright, shining” (Cognates: Sanskrit ketu “brightness, appearance”). Originally a free-standing word (see hade); in Modern English it survives only in this suffix


circumcised adj.
a. Having the prepuce cut off; that has undergone circumcision. (Allusively used for ‘Jewish’ or ‘Muslim’.)
b. fig. Spiritually chastened or purified.
2. Cut or shorn round. Obs.
3. Cut short, curtailed, circumscribed Obs.

circumcise n.
mid-13c., “to cut off the foreskin,” from Old French circoncisier “circumcise” (12c., Modern French circoncire), from Latin circumcisus, past participle of circumcidere “to cut round, to cut trim, to cut off” (see circumcision). Related: Circumcised; circumcising.

skin v.
late 14c., “to remove the skin from” (originally of circumcision), from skin (n.). As “to have (a particular kind of) skin” from c. 1400. In 19c. U.S. colloquial use, “to strip, fleece, plunder;” hence skin-game, one in which one player has no chance against the others (as with a stacked deck), the type of con game played in a skin-house. Skin the cat in gymnastics is from 1845. Related: Skinned; skinning.

fleece v.
1530s in the literal sense of “to strip (a sheep) of fleece,” from fleece (n.). From 1570s in the figurative meaning “to cheat, swindle, strip of money.” Related: Fleeced; fleecer; fleecing.

Genesis 3 Kjv
21 Unto Adam also and to his wife did the Lord God make coats of skins, and clothed them.


surname n.
c. 1300, “name, title, or epithet added to a person’s name,” from sur “above” (from Latin super-; see sur- (1)) + name (n.); modeled on Anglo-French surnoun “surname” (early 14c.), variant of Old French sornom, from sur “over” + nom “name.” As “family name” from late 14c.

An Old English word for this was freonama, literally “free name.” Meaning “family name” is first found late 14c. Hereditary surnames existed among Norman nobility in England in early 12c., among the common people they began to be used 13c., increasingly frequent until near universal by end of 14c. The process was later in the north of England than the south. The verb is attested from 1510s. Related: Surnamed.
surprefix.
word-forming element meaning “over, above, beyond, in addition,” especially in words from Anglo-French and Old French, from Old French sour-, sor-, sur-, from Latin super (see super-).


https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/christ-and-the-canaanite-woman.jpg?w=840


gentile n.
“one who is not a Jew,” c. 1400; earlier “one who is not a Christian, a pagan” (late 14c.), from Late Latin noun use of Latin gentilis “of the same family or clan, of or belonging to a Roman gens,” from gens (genitive gentis) “race, clan” (see genus, and compare gentle).

The Latin adjective also meant “of or belonging to the same nation,” hence, as a noun, gentiles (plural) might mean “men of family; persons belonging to the same family; fellow countrymen, kinsmen,” but also “foreigners, barbarians” (as opposed to Romans), those bound only by the Jus Gentium, the “law of nations,” defined as “the law that natural reason establishes among all mankind and is followed by all peoples alike.”

The Latin word then was used in the Vulgate to translate Greek ethnikos (see ethnic), from ta ethne “the nations,” which translated Hebrew ha goyim “the (non-Jewish) nations” (see goy). Hence in Late Latin, after the Christianization of Rome, gentilis also could mean “pagans, heathens,” as opposed to Christians. Based on Scripture, gentile also was used by Mormons (1847) and Shakers (1857) to refer to those not of their profession.
goy n.
“a gentile, a non-Jew” (plural goyim), 1835, from Hebrew goy “people, nation;” in Mishnaic and Modern Hebrew, also “gentile” (compare gentile). The fem. form of the Hebrew word entered Middle French as gouge “a wench” (15c.).


pledge v.
c. 1400, “to promise” (something to someone), “to give over as security for repayment,” also “promise faith to,” from pledge (n.) and from Old French plegier, from plege (n.). From mid-15c. as “to stand surety for, be responsible for;” late 15c. as “to mortgage.” Meaning “put (someone) under oath” is from 1570s; sense of “to solemnly promise or guarantee” is from 1590s, as is sense “to drink a toast.” Related: Pledged; pledging.
pledge n.
mid-14c., “surety, bail,” from Old French plege (Modern French pleige) “hostage, security, bail,” probably from Frankish *plegan “to guarantee,” from *pleg-, a West Germanic root meaning “have responsibility for” (cognates: Old Saxon plegan “vouch for,” Middle Dutch plien “to answer for, guarantee,” Old High German pflegan “to care for, be accustomed to,” Old English pleon “to risk the loss of, expose to danger;” see plight (v.)).

Meaning “allegiance vow attested by drinking with another” is from 1630s. Sense of “solemn promise” first recorded 1814, though this notion is from 16c. in the verb. Weekley notes the “curious contradiction” in pledge (v.) “to toast with a drink” (1540s) and pledge (n.) “the vow to abstain from drinking” (1833). Meaning “student who has agreed to join a fraternity or sorority” dates from 1901.

2014 show 103 march 19

Tonight’s topic among others: 666 “Their” Mark of the Beast! “something unknown” S.I.N

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Tonight’s topic among others: 666 “Their” Mark of the Beast!


childhood n.
Old English cild “fetus, infant, unborn or newly born person,” from Proto-Germanic *kiltham (cognates: Gothic kilþei “womb,” inkilþo “pregnant;” Danish kuld “children of the same marriage;” Old Swedish kulder “litter;” Old English cildhama “womb,” lit. “child-home”); no certain cognates outside Germanic. “App[arently] originally always used in relation to the mother as the ‘fruit of the womb'” [Buck]. Also in late Old English, “a youth of gentle birth” (archaic, usually written childe). In 16c.-17c. especially “girl child.”

The wider sense “young person before the onset of puberty” developed in late Old English. Phrase with child “pregnant” (late 12c.) retains the original sense. The sense extension from “infant” to “child” also is found in French enfant, Latin infans. Meaning “one’s own child; offspring of parents” is from late 12c. (the Old English word was bearn; see bairn). Figurative use from late 14c. Most Indo-European languages use the same word for “a child” and “one’s child,” though there are exceptions (such as Latin liberi/pueri).

The difficulty with the plural began in Old English, where the nominative plural was at first cild, identical with the singular, then c.975 a plural form cildru (genitive cildra) arose, probably for clarity’s sake, only to be re-pluraled late 12c. as children, which is thus a double plural. Middle English plural cildre survives in Lancashire dialect childer and in Childermas.
chi n.
22nd letter of the Greek alphabet, representing a -kh- sound (see ch). The letter is shaped like an X, and so the Greek letter name was used figuratively to signify such a shape or arrangement (as in khiasma “two things placed crosswise;” khiastos “arranged diagonally; marked with an X;” khiazein “to mark with an ‘X’, to write the letter ‘X'”). Some dialects used chi to represent the -ks- sound properly belonging to xi; Latin picked this up and the sound value of chi in Latin-derived alphabets is now that of English X.
X
The entire entry for X in Johnson’s dictionary (1756) is: “X is a letter, which, though found in Saxon words, begins no word in the English language.” Most English words beginning in -x- are of Greek origin or modern commercial coinages. East Anglian in 14c. showed a tendency to use -x- for initial sh-, sch- (such as xal for shall), which didn’t catch on but seems an improvement over the current system. As a symbol of a kiss on a letter, etc., it is recorded from 1765. In malt liquor, XX denoted “double quality” and XXX “strongest quality” (1827).

Algebraic meaning “unknown quantity” (1660 in English, from French), sometimes is said to be from medieval use, originally a crossed -r-, in that case probably from Latin radix (see root n.). Other theories trace it to Arabic (Klein), but a more prosaic explanation says Descartes (1637) took x, y, z, the last three letters of the alphabet, for unknowns to correspond to a, b, c, used for known quantities.

Used allusively for “unknown person” from 1797, “something unknown” since 1859. As a type of chromosome, attested from 1902 (first so called in German; Henking, 1891). To designate “films deemed suitable for adults only,” first used 1950 in Britain; adopted in U.S. Nov. 1, 1968. The XYZ Affair in American history (1797) involved French agents designated by those letters.
-ild An obsolete dialectal form of yield. It occurs in the phrase God ild, for God yield. See under God.
yield n.
Old English gield “payment, sum of money; service, offering, worship;” from the source of yield v.. Extended sense of “production” (as of crops) is first attested mid-15c. Earliest English sense survives in financial “yield from investments.”
-hood
word-forming element meaning “state or condition of being,” from Old English -had “condition, quality, position” (as in cildhad “childhood,” preosthad “priesthood,” werhad “manhood”), cognate with German -heit/-keit, Dutch -heid, Old Frisian and Old Saxon -hed, all from Proto-Germanic *haidus “manner, quality,” literally “bright appearance,” from PIE (s)kai- (1) “bright, shining” (Cognates: Sanskrit ketu “brightness, appearance”). Originally a free-standing word (see hade); in Modern English it survives only in this suffix


consent n.
c. 1300, “approval,” also “agreement in sentiment, harmony,” from Old French consente, from consentir (see consent v.). Age of consent is attested from 1809.
consent v.
early 13c., from Old French consentir (12c.) “agree, comply,” from Latin consentire “feel together,” from com- “with” (see com-) + sentire “to feel” (see sense n.). “Feeling together,” hence, “agreeing, giving permission,” apparently a sense evolution that took place in French before the word reached English. Related: Consented; consenting.


tax n.
early 14c., “obligatory contribution levied by a sovereign or government,” from Anglo-French tax, Old French taxe, and directly from Medieval Latin taxa, from Latin taxare (see tax v.). Related: Taxes. Tax-deduction is from 1942; tax-shelter is attested from 1961.
tax v.
c. 1300, “impose a tax on,” from Old French taxer “impose a tax” (13c.) and directly from Latin taxare “evaluate, estimate, assess, handle,” also “censure, charge,” probably a frequentative form of tangere “to touch” (see tangent (adj.)). Sense of “to burden, put a strain on” first recorded early 14c.; that of “censure, reprove” is from 1560s. Its use in Luke ii for Greek apographein “to enter on a list, enroll” is due to Tyndale. Related: Taxed; taxing.

2014 show 98 march 12

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Tonight’s topic among others: A question about usury and the dualistic nature of the Bible
Grace Vs Legal


usury n.
c. 1300, “practice of lending money at interest,” later, at excessive rates of interest, from Medieval Latin usuria, alteration of Latin usura “payment for the use of money, interest,” literally “a usage, use, enjoyment,” from usus, from stem of uti (see use (v.)). From mid-15c. as “premium paid for the use of money, interest,” especially “exorbitant interest.”
usurer n.
late 13c., “one who lends money at interest,” but later especially “one who lends money at an exorbitant rate of interest,” from Anglo-French usurer, Old French usurier, usureor, from Medieval Latin usurarius “money-lender, usurer,” from Latin usurarius (adj.) “pertaining to interest; that pays interest,” from usura (see usury).


jew
Extortionate usurer

grace n.
late 12c., “God’s unmerited favor, love, or help,” from Old French grace “pardon, divine grace, mercy; favor, thanks; elegance, virtue” (12c., Modern French grâce), from Latin gratia “favor, esteem, regard; pleasing quality, good will, gratitude” (source of Italian grazia, Spanish gracia; in Church use translating Greek kharisma), from gratus “pleasing, agreeable,” from PIE *gwreto-, suffixed form of root *gwere- (3) “to favor” (cognates: Sanskrit grnati “sings, praises, announces,” Lithuanian giriu “to praise, celebrate,” Avestan gar- “to praise”).

Sense of “virtue” is early 14c., that of “beauty of form or movement, pleasing quality” is mid-14c. In classical sense, “one of the three sister goddesses (Latin Gratiæ, Greek Kharites), bestowers of beauty and charm,” it is first recorded in English 1579 in Spenser. In music, “an embellishment not essential to the melody or harmony,” 1650s. As the name of the short prayer that is said before or after a meal (early 13c.; until 16c. usually graces) it has a sense of “gratitude.” As a title of honor, c. 1500.

2014 show 93 march 05

Foundation documentation talk #birthcertificate

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Tonight’s topic among others: Foundation documentation talk birthcertificate


born
Old English boren, alternative past participle of beran (see bear (v.)). Distinction between born and borne is 17c.
suborn v.
“to procure unlawfully, to bribe to accomplish a wicked purpose, especially to induce a witness to perjury, “to lure (someone) to commit a crime,” 1530s, from Middle French suborner “seduce, instigate, bribe” (13c.) and directly from Latin subornare “employ as a secret agent, incite secretly,” originally “equip, fit out, furnish,” from sub “under, secretly” (see sub-) + ornare “equip,” related to ordo “order” (see order (n.)). Related: Suborned; suborning.


informer n.
late 14c., enfourmer “instructor, one who teaches or gives advice,” from inform (Middle English enfourmen) and also from Old French enformeor. Meaning “one who communicates information” is mid-15c.; sense of “one who gives information against another” (especially in reference to law-breaking) is c. 1500.
informant n.
1690s, “someone who supplies information,” from Latin informantem (nominative informans), present participle of informare “train, instruct, educate” (see inform). Occasionally as “one who gives information to the authorities, one who dishonorably betrays knowledge gained in confidence” (1783). Informer is older in both senses and more usual in the latter. As an adjective from 1890.

2014 show 88 feb 26

Daniels first show on The Corporation Nation. Clint & Daniel expatiate over the Christian remedy in law.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Daniels first show on The Corporation Nation and a must hear introduction to the subject of Christian remedy in law and;

(JPEG Image, 900 × 1314 pixels) - white


Romans 2:11 Wycliffe Bible Wyc
11 For acception of persons is not with God.

Deuteronomy 1:17 Wyc

No difference shall be in doom of persons; ye shall hear so a little man, that is, poor, as a great man, neither ye shall take heed to the person of any man, for it is the doom of God.
That if anything seemeth hard to you, tell ye that to me, and I shall hear it.

Acts 10:34 Wyc
And Peter opened his mouth, and said, In truth I have found, that God is no acceptor of persons;

James 2:9 Wyc
But if ye take persons, ye work sin, and be reproved of the law, as trespassers


secular adj.
c. 1300, “living in the world, not belonging to a religious order,” also “belonging to the state,” from Old French seculer (Modern French séculier), from Late Latin saecularis “worldly, secular, pertaining to a generation or age,” from Latin saecularis “of an age, occurring once in an age,” from saeculum “age, span of time, generation.”

According to Watkins, this is probably from PIE *sai-tlo-, with instrumental element *-tlo- + *sai- “to bind, tie” (see sinew), extended metaphorically to successive human generations as links in the chain of life. Another theory connects it with words for “seed,” from PIE root *se- “to sow” (see sow (v.), and compare Gothic mana-seþs “mankind, world,” literally “seed of men”).

Used in ecclesiastical writing like Greek aion “of this world” (see cosmos). It is source of French siècle. Ancient Roman ludi saeculares was a three-day, day-and-night celebration coming once in an “age” (120 years). In English, in reference to humanism and the exclusion of belief in God from matters of ethics and morality, from 1850s.

se
word-forming element, from Latin se-, collateral form of sed- “without, apart, aside, on one’s own,” related to sed, Latin reflexive pronoun (accusative and ablative), from PIE *sed-, extended form of root *s(w)e-, pronoun of the third person and reflexive (source also of German sich; see idiom).

ular
word-forming element, see -ule + -ar.

ule
word-forming element meaning “small, little” (in capsule, module, etc.), from French -ule, from Latin diminutive suffix -ulus (fem. -ula, neuter -ulum), from PIE *-(o)lo-, from *-lo-, secondary suffix forming diminutives, which also is the source of the first element in native diminutive suffix -ling.

yule, n.
2. Christmas and the festivities connected therewith. (Still the name in Sc. and north. dial.; since c1850 also a literary archaism in English). Freshly cut Log made kept burning for an extended length of time. Small pieces of old burned log ignite a new Yule log yearly.

ar
word-formation element meaning “pertaining to, of the nature of,” from Latin -arem, -aris “of the kind of, belonging to,” a secondary form of -alis, dissimilated form used after syllables with an -l- (such as insularis for *insulalis, stellaris for *stellalis).