2014 show 182 july 23

The creation of the World, the creation of the Earth, the LORD God Anthropomorphitism and the infallible Kjv Pick up your Staurós and follow me.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Having a debate about Genesis and to look at the translators of the King James Bible, and;


genesis n.
Old English Genesis, first book of the Pentateuch, which tells among other things of the creation of the world, from Latin genesis “generation, nativity,” in Late Latin taken as the title of first book of the Old Testament, from Greek genesis “origin, creation, generation,” from gignesthai “to be born,” related to genos “race, birth, descent” (see genus). Greek translators used the word as the title of the biblical book, rendering Hebrew bereshith, literally “in the beginning,” which was the first word of the text, taken as its title. Extended sense of “origin, creation” first recorded in English c. 1600.
Genesis 1 Kjv.
1 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.
2 And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.
3 And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.
4 And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.
5 And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.
6 And God said, Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters.

Genesis 1 Wyc.
1 In the beginning God made of nought heaven and earth.
2 Forsooth the earth was idle and void, and darknesses were on the face of depth; and the Spirit of the Lord was borne on the waters
3 And God said, Light be made, and the light was made.
4 And God saw the light, that it was good, and he parted the light from darknesses;
5 and he called the light, day, and the darknesses, night. And the eventide and the morrowtide was made, one day.
6 And God said, The firmament be made in the midst of waters, and part waters from waters.


anthropomorphite n. mid-15c.; see anthropomorphite + -ist.
The sect of Antropomorfitis, whiche helden that God in his godhede hath hondis and feet and othere suche membris. [Reginald Pecock, “The Repressor of Over Much Blaming of the Clergy,” 1449]
Related: Anthropomorphitism (1660s).


Nimrod
“great hunter,” 1712, a reference to the biblical son of Cush, referred to (Gen. x:8-9) as “a mighty hunter before the Lord.” It came to mean “geek, klutz” by 1983 in teenager slang, for unknown reasons. (Amateur theories include its occasional use in “Bugs Bunny” cartoon episodes featuring rabbit-hunting Elmer Fudd as a foil; its possible ironic use, among hunters, for a clumsy member of their fraternity; or a stereotype of deer hunters by the non-hunting population in the U.S.)


σταυρός staurós, stow-ros’; from the base of G2476; a stake or post (as set upright), i.e. (specially), a pole or cross (as an instrument of capital punishment); figuratively, exposure to death, i.e. self-denial; by implication, the atonement of Christ:—cross.
Strong’s Definitions