2014 show 137 may 07

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Tonight’s topic among others: Whats in the Bible, Is it all a warning? and Activist post Robot Bees and Man created nothing, and;


revelation n. c. 1300, “disclosure of information to man by a divine or supernatural agency,” from Old French revelacion and directly from Latin revelationem (nominative revelatio), noun of action from past participle stem of revelare “unveil, uncover, lay bare” (see reveal). General meaning “disclosure of facts” is attested from late 14c.; meaning “striking disclosure” is from 1862. As the name of the last book of the New Testament (Revelation of St. John), it is first attested late 14c. (see apocalypse); as simply Revelations, it is first recorded 1690s.
**tribulation (n.)
c. 1200, from Old French tribulacion (12c.), from Church Latin tribulationem (nominative tribulatio) “distress, trouble, affliction,” noun of action from past participle stem of tribulare “to oppress, afflict,” a figurative use by Christian writers of Latin tribulare “to press,” also possibly “to thresh out grain,” from tribulum “threshing sledge,” from stem of terere “to rub” (see throw (v.)) + -bulum, suffix forming names of tools.

Genesis 2 Wyc

2 Therefore heavens and earth be made perfect, and all the ornament of those.

2 And God [ful]filled in the seventh day his work which he made; and he rested in the seventh day from all his work which he had made;

3 and he blessed the seventh day, and hallowed it; for in that day God ceased of all his work which he made of nought, that he should make.

The Trouble with Tribbles ( the 44th episode of Star Trek )


suicide n. “deliberate killing of oneself,” 1650s, from Modern Latin suicidium “suicide,” from Latin sui “of oneself” (genitive of se “self”), from PIE *s(u)w-o- “one’s own,” from root *s(w)e- (see idiom) + -cidium “a killing” (see -cide). Probably an English coinage; much maligned by Latin purists because it “may as well seem to participate of sus, a sow, as of the pronoun sui” [Phillips]. The meaning “person who kills himself deliberately” is from 1728. In Anglo-Latin, the term for “one who commits suicide” was felo-de-se, literally “one guilty concerning himself.”

Even in 1749, in the full blaze of the philosophic movement, we find a suicide named Portier dragged through the streets of Paris with his face to the ground, hung from a gallows by his feet, and then thrown into the sewers; and the laws were not abrogated till the Revolution, which, having founded so many other forms of freedom, accorded the liberty of death. [W.E.H. Lecky, “History of European Morals,” 1869]

In England, suicides were legally criminal if of age and sane, but not if judged to have been mentally deranged. The criminal ones were mutilated by stake and given degrading burial in highways until 1823. Suicide blonde (one who has “dyed by her own hand”) first attested 1921. Baseball suicide squeeze is attested from 1937.