2015 show 295 jan 21

The Shmita! The Jew Bile Epsilon, the moon of blood and a self-fulfilling prophecy

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Tonight’s topic among others: The Shmita! which can predict all financial collapses! and; God is responsible for Shmita’s which are a Seven year cycle! How can Empires Crashing be Predicted and; Shmita is also known as the Release or the Collapse! and; 1929 happened on the day of the Shmita and WWI happened on the Year of the Shmita and WWII happened on the Seven year cycle of the Shmita and 2001, Was the end of Towers, or Shakings.. in the middle of the 49 Year Period or Jubilee and Seven Years later another Jubiliee.. the Financial Crisis of 2008 and; The Jubilee ends in September 2015, is this the Financial Collapse?
Shmita – Wikipedia


self-fulfilling prophecy
Any positive or negative expectation about circumstances, events, or people that may affect a person’s behavior toward them in a manner that causes those expectations to be fulfilled.
becoming real or true by virtue of having been predicted or expected self–fulfilling prophecy


888
In Christian numerology, the number 888 represents Jesus, or sometimes more specifically Christ the Redeemer.
888 (number) – Wikipedia


Revelation 3:9 Kjv
Behold, I will make them of the synagogue of Satan, which say they are Jews, and are not, but do lie; behold, I will make them to come and worship before thy feet, and to know that I have loved thee.


https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/offering_by_lund.jpg


jubilee n.
late 14c., in the Old Testament sense, from Old French jubileu “jubille; anniversary; rejoicing,” from Late Latin iubilaeus “the jubilee year,” originally an adjective, “of the jubilee,” altered (by association with Latin iubilare “to shout with joy”) from Greek iabelaios, from iobelos, from Hebrew yobhel “jubilee,” formerly “a trumpet, ram’s horn,” literally “ram.”

The original notion was of a year of emancipation of slaves and restoration of lands, to be celebrated every 50th year (Levit. xxv:9); it was proclaimed by the sounding of a ram’s horn on the Day of Atonement. The Catholic Church sense of “a period for remission of sin penalties in exchange for pilgrimages, alms, etc.” was begun in 1300 by Boniface VIII. The general sense of “season of rejoicing” is first recorded mid-15c., though through early 20c. the word kept its specific association with 50th anniversaries. As a type of African-American folk song, it is attested from 1872.

Leviticus 25:9 Kjv
Then shalt thou cause the trumpet of the jubile to sound on the tenth day of the seventh month, in the day of atonement shall ye make the trumpet sound throughout all your land.

Jew n. v.
a. A person of Hebrew descent; one whose religion is Judaism; an Israelite.
To cheat or overreach, in the way attributed to Jewish traders or usurers. Also, to drive a hard bargain, and intr., to haggle. Phr. to jew down, to beat down in price; also transf.These uses are now considered to be offensive.
bile n.
1660s, from French bile (17c.) “bile,” also, informally, “anger,” from Latin bilis “fluid secreted by the liver,” also one of the four humors (also known as choler), thus “anger, peevishness” (especially as black bile, 1797).
Epsilon
is the fifth letter of the Greek alphabet, corresponding phonetically to a close-mid front unrounded vowel /e/. In the system of Greek numerals it has the value five. It was derived from the Phoenician letter He
In Judaism
He is often used to represent the name of God, as He stands for Hashem, which means The Name and is a way of saying God without actually saying the name of God.


Joel 2:31 Kjv
The sun shall be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, before the great and terrible day of the Lord come.


https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/blood-moon.jpg?w=840


city n.
early 13c., in medieval usage a cathedral town, but originally “any settlement,” regardless of size (distinction from town is 14c., though in English it always seems to have ranked above borough), from Old French cite “town, city” (10c., Modern French cité), from earlier citet, from Latin civitatem (nominative civitas; in Late Latin sometimes citatem) originally “citizenship, condition or rights of a citizen, membership in the community,” later “community of citizens, state, commonwealth” (used, for instance of the Gaulish tribes), from civis “townsman,” from PIE root *kei- “to lie; bed, couch; homestead; beloved, dear” (see cemetery).

The sense has been transferred from the inhabitants to the place. The Latin word for “city” was urbs, but a resident was civis. Civitas seems to have replaced urbs as Rome (the ultimate urbs) lost its prestige. Loss of Latin -v- is regular in French in some situations (compare alleger from alleviare; neige from nivea; jeune from juvenis. A different sound evolution from the Latin word yielded Italian citta, Catalan ciutat, Spanish ciudad, Portuguese cidade.

Replaced Old English burh (see borough). London is the city from 1550s. As an adjective from c. 1300. City hall first recorded 1670s to fight city hall is 1913, American English; city slicker first recorded 1916 (see slick); both American English. City limits is from 1825. The newspaper city desk attested from 1878. Inner city first attested 1968. City state (also city-state) is attested from 1877.


Leviticus 25 Kjv
23 The land shall not be sold for ever: for the land is mine, for ye are strangers and sojourners with me.
28 But if he be not able to restore it to him, then that which is sold shall remain in the hand of him that hath bought it until the year of jubile: and in the jubile it shall go out, and he shall return unto his possession.


gentile n.
“one who is not a Jew,” c. 1400; earlier “one who is not a Christian, a pagan” (late 14c.), from Late Latin noun use of Latin gentilis “of the same family or clan, of or belonging to a Roman gens,” from gens (genitive gentis) “race, clan” (see genus, and compare gentle).

The Latin adjective also meant “of or belonging to the same nation,” hence, as a noun, gentiles (plural) might mean “men of family; persons belonging to the same family; fellow countrymen, kinsmen,” but also “foreigners, barbarians” (as opposed to Romans), those bound only by the Jus Gentium, the “law of nations,” defined as “the law that natural reason establishes among all mankind and is followed by all peoples alike.”

The Latin word then was used in the Vulgate to translate Greek ethnikos (see ethnic), from ta ethne “the nations,” which translated Hebrew ha goyim “the (non-Jewish) nations” (see goy). Hence in Late Latin, after the Christianization of Rome, gentilis also could mean “pagans, heathens,” as opposed to Christians. Based on Scripture, gentile also was used by Mormons (1847) and Shakers (1857) to refer to those not of their profession.
goy n.
“a gentile, a non-Jew” (plural goyim), 1835, from Hebrew goy “people, nation;” in Mishnaic and Modern Hebrew, also “gentile” (compare gentile). The fem. form of the Hebrew word entered Middle French as gouge “a wench” (15c.).

gentilitious adj.
1. Characteristic of a ‘gentile’; pagan. Obs.—1
2. Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of, a nation; national. (= gentilitial adj. 1.)
a. Of or pertaining to a gens or family. (= gentilitial adj. 2.)


Consideration n.
1. The act of considering; mental view; regard; notice.
2. Mature thought; serious deliberation
5. That which is considered; motive of action; influence; ground of conduct.
6. Reason; that which induces to a determination.
7. In law, the reason which moves a contracting party to enter into an agreement; the material cause of a contract; the price or motive of a stipulation. In all contracts, each party gives something in exchange for what he receives.


human adj. n.human, 17 yuman (nonstandard).
Chiefly fig. Designating a person who takes on the appearance or form, or who performs the function of a specified (esp. inanimate) thing; (also) designating a person who assumes the appearance, role, or abilities of a specified creature.
human adj.
mid-15c., humain, humaigne, “human,” from Old French humain, umain (adj.) “of or belonging to man” (12c.), from Latin humanus “of man, human,” also “humane, philanthropic, kind, gentle, polite; learned, refined, civilized.” This is in part from PIE *(dh)ghomon-, literally “earthling, earthly being,” as opposed to the gods (see homunculus). Compare Hebrew adam “man,” from adamah “ground.” Cognate with Old Lithuanian zmuo (accusative zmuni) “man, male person.”
Human interest is from 1824. Human rights attested by 1680s; human being by 1690s. Human relations is from 1916; human resources attested by 1907, American English, apparently originally among social Christians and based on natural resources.
homunculus n.
“tiny human being produced artificially,” 1650s, from Latin homunculus (plural homunculi), literally “little person,” with -culus, diminutive suffix, + homo (genitive hominis), which technically meant “male human,” but it also was used with a sense “the human race, mankind;” while in Vulgar Latin it could be used as “one, anyone, they, people” and in logical and scholastic writing as “a human being, person.” This is conjectured to be perhaps from PIE *(dh)ghomon-, literally “earthling,” from *dhghem- “earth” (see chthonic; also compare human). Other Latin diminutives from homo included homullus, homuncio.

Homunculus-alchemical-creation

2014 show 281 dec 31

In the year of our Dark Lord Vulgaris and; thank God Christ is dead, we can all live in a lie and not take responsibility for anything and pay for our Sins in Cash.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Clint and Daniel continue to search for a path through the legal ties that bind us to the Fiction!


anno Domini nostri Iesu (or Jesu) Christi
Vulgaris aerae (Vulgar Era)


lord v.
c. 1300, “to exercise lordship,” from lord (n.). Meaning “to play the lord, domineer” is late 14c. Related: Lorded; lording. To lord it is from 1570s.
lord n.
mid-13c., laverd, loverd, from Old English hlaford “master of a household, ruler, superior,” also “God” (translating Latin Dominus, though Old English drihten was used more often), earlier hlafweard, literally “one who guards the loaves,” from hlaf “bread, loaf” (see loaf (n.)) + weard “keeper, guardian” (see ward (n.)). Compare lady (literally “bread-kneader”), and Old English hlafæta “household servant,” literally “loaf-eater.” Modern monosyllabic form emerged 14c. As an interjection from late 14c. Lord’s Prayer is from 1540s. Lord of the Flies translates Beelzebub (q.v.) and was name of 1954 book by William Golding. To drink like a lord is from 1620s.


invent v.
c. 1500, “to find, discover” (obsolete), a back-formation from invention or else from Latin inventus, past participle of invenire “to come upon; devise, discover.” General sense of “make up, fabricate, concoct, devise” (a plot, excuse, etc.) is from 1530s, as is that of “produce by original thought, find out by original study or contrivance.” Related: Invented; inventing.
inventor n.
c. 1500, “a discoverer, one who finds out” (now obsolete), from Latin inventor (fem. inventrix, source of French inventeur (15c.), Spanish inventor, Italian inventore) “contriver, author, discoverer, proposer, founder,” agent noun from past participle stem of invenire “to come upon, find; find out; invent, discover, devise; ascertain; acquire, get earn,” from in- “in, on” (see in- (2)) + venire “to come” (see venue). Meaning “one who contrives or produces a new thing or process” is from 1550s.


https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/the_fall_expelled_from_eden_adam_and_eve_raise_a_family_an_wellcome_v0034422.jpg

Genesis 3 Kjv.
13 And the Lord God said unto the woman, What is this that thou hast done? And the woman said, The serpent beguiled me, and I did eat.
22 And the Lord God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil: and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever:
23 Therefore the Lord God sent him forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground from whence he was taken.
24 So he drove out the man; and he placed at the east of the garden of Eden Cherubims, and a flaming sword which turned every way, to keep the way of the tree of life.


Vúlgar adj. [vulgaire, Fr. vulgaris, Lat.]
Plebian; suiting to the common people; practised among the common people.

Men who have passed all their time in low and vulgar life, cannot have a suitable idea of the several beauties and blemishes in the actions of great men. Addison.
Mean; low; being of the common rate.

It requiring too great a sagacity for vulgar minds to draw the line between virtue and vice, no wonder if most men attempt not a laborious scrutiny into things themselves, but only take names and words, and so rest in them. South.

Nor wasting years my former strength confound, And added woes have bow’d me to the ground: Yet by the stubble you may guess the grain, And mark the ruins of no vulgar man. Broome. Publick; commonly bruited.

Do you hear aught of a battle toward? — Most sure, and vulgar; every one hears that. Shakesp.

vēra
um| verior -or -us| verissimus -a -um ADJ
true | real| genuine | actual; properly named; well founded; right| fair| proper
vere : in fact, real, true.
vere : truly, really, actually, rightly.
vera Ods. Etymology: Apparently veer v.
A command to let out more of the sheet.
veer v.
b. To let out (any line or rope); to allow to run out gradually to a desired length.
vera causa n.
A true cause which brings about an effect as a minimum independent agency.
1977 Brit. Jrnl. Hist. Sci. 10 238 Darwin’s commitment to the vera causa—or ‘true cause’—principle.


https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/screenshot-from-2015-03-07-233422.png?w=840

I wish I could remember where this image is from.
The astute will imidiatly see the genitalia joke.


Miracle n. [ Latin miraculum, from miror, to wonder ]
1. Literally, a wonder or wonderful thing; but appropriately,
2. In theology, an event or effect contrary to the established constitution and course of things, or a deviation from the known laws of nature; a supernatural event. Miracles can be wrought only by Almighty power, as when Christ healed lepers, saying, ‘I will, be thou clean, ‘ or calmed the tempest, ‘Peace, be still.’

They considered not the miracle of the loaves. Mark 6:52.

A man approved of God by miracles and signs. Acts 2:22.

  1. Anciently, a spectacle or dramatic representation exhibiting the lives of the saints.

Anno Lucis Wiki


idolatry n.
“worship of idols and images,” mid-13c., from Old French idolatrie (12c.), from Vulgar Latin idolatria, contraction of Late Latin idololatria (Tertullian), from Ecclesiastical Greek eidololatria “worship of idols,” from eidolon “image” (see idol) + latreia “worship, service” (see –latry).
latry
word-forming element meaning “worship of,” used as an element in native formations from 19c. (such as bardolatry), from Greek -latreia “worship, service paid to the gods, hired labor,” related to latron (n.) “pay, hire,” latris “servant, worshipper,” from PIE *le- (1) “to get” (see larceny).


pope n.
Old English papa (9c.), from Church Latin papa “bishop, pope” (in classical Latin, “tutor”), from Greek papas “patriarch, bishop,” originally “father.” Applied to bishops of Asia Minor and taken as a title by the Bishop of Alexandria c.250. In Western Church, applied especially to the Bishop of Rome since the time of Leo the Great (440-461) and claimed exclusively by them from 1073 (usually in English with a capital P-). Popemobile, his car, is from 1979. Papal, papacy, later acquisitions in English, preserve the original vowel.
popery n.
1530s, a hostile coinage of the Reformation, from pope + –ery.
ery
word-forming element making nouns meaning “place for, art of, condition of, quantity of,” from Middle English -erie, from Latin -arius (see -ary). Also sometimes in modern colloquial use “the collectivity of” or “an example of.”


perversion n.
late 14c., “action of turning aside from truth, corruption, distortion” (originally of religious beliefs), from Latin perversionem (nominative perversio) “a turning about,” noun of action from past participle stem of pervertere (see pervert (v.)). Psychological sense of “disorder of sexual behavior in which satisfaction is sought through channels other than those of normal heterosexual intercourse” is from 1892, originally including homosexuality.

Perversions are defined as unnatural acts, acts contrary to nature, bestial, abominable, and detestable. Such laws are interpretable only in accordance with the ancient tradition of the English common law which … is committed to the doctrine that no sexual activity is justifiable unless its objective is procreation. [A.C. Kinsey, et.al., “Sexual Behavior in the Human Male,” 1948]
per
word-forming element meaning “through, throughout; thoroughly; entirely, utterly,” from Latin preposition per (see per (prep.)).
version n.
1580s, “a translation,” from Middle French version, from Medieval Latin versionem (nominative versio) “a turning, a translation,” from past participle stem of Latin vertere “to turn, change, alter, translate” (see versus). Also with a Middle English sense of “destruction;” the meaning “particular form of a description” is first attested 1788.


atonement n.
1510s, “condition of being at one (with others),” from atone + -ment. Meaning “reconciliation” (especially of sinners with God) is from 1520s; that of “propitiation of an offended party” is from 1610s.

attorney n.
early 14c. (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin), from Old French atorné “(one) appointed,” past participle of aturner “to decree, assign, appoint,” from atorner (see attorn). The legal Latin form attornare influenced the spelling in Anglo-French. The sense is of “one appointed to represent another’s interests.”

In English law, a private attorney was one appointed to act for another in business or legal affairs (usually for pay); an attorney at law or public attorney was a qualified legal agent in the courts of Common Law who prepared the cases for a barrister, who pleaded them (the equivalent of a solicitor in Chancery). So much a term of contempt in England that it was abolished by the Judicature Act of 1873 and merged with solicitor.

Johnson observed that “he did not care to speak ill of any man behind his back, but he believed the gentleman was an attorney.” [Boswell]

The double -t- is a mistaken 15c. attempt to restore a non-existent Latin original. Attorney general first recorded 1530s in sense of “legal officer of the state” (late 13c. in Anglo-French), from French, hence the odd plural (subject first, adjective second).


unconscionable adj. adv. n.
a. Of actions, behaviour, etc.: showing no regard for conscience; not in accordance with what is right or reasonable.
b. Unreasonably excessive; exorbitant. Also in weakened sense: extremely or unbelievably large, long, etc.; inordinate.
c. As an intensifier: outrageous, arrant; flagrant
d. Law. Of a contract, bargain, etc.: grossly unfair, esp. to a weaker party, and therefore liable to be set aside or modified by a court.
a. Having no conscience; acting or inclined to act without regard for what is right; unscrupulous, esp. out of avarice.


Undue adj.
1. Not due; not yet demandable of right; as a debt, note or bond undue
2. Not right; not legal; improper; as an undue proceeding.
3. Not agreeable to a rule or standard, or to duty; not proportioned; excessive; as an undue regard to the externals of religion; an undue attachment to forms; an undue rigor in the execution of law.

2014 show 262 nov 26

Is the Bible not a compendium of Ancient Knowledge? Bread of deceit is sweet to a man, Confessions Of A Former Truther Government is your god. Volunteerism.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Everyone can benefit from the Bible! Many sections of the Bible, originated long before Christ! The Bible is not a Plagiarism, it is a compendium of Ancient Knowledge! Voluntary Societies – We already Live in One!


Revelation 13:17 Kjb
17 And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.

beast. Any animal with four feet; a brutish, vile, or lecherous person.

monster. A plant or creature terribly deformed. A human-being by birth, but in some part resembling a lower animal.
A monster . . . hath no inheritable blood, and cannot be heir to any land, albeit it be brought forth in marriage; but,
although it hath deformity in any part of its body, yet if it hath human shape, it may be heir
.” 2 Bl Comm 246.
BALLENTINE’S LAW DICTIONARY – THIRD EDITION


signature n.
1530s, a kind of document in Scottish law, from Middle French signature (16c.) or directly from Medieval Latin signatura “signature, a rescript,” in classical Latin “the matrix of a seal,” from signatus, past participle of signare “to mark with a stamp, sign” (see sign n.).
Meaning “one’s own name written in one’s own hand” is from 1570s, replacing sign-manual (early 15c.) in this sense. Musical sense of “signs placed it the beginning of a staff to indicate the key and rhythm” is from 1806. Meaning “a distinguishing mark of any kind” is from 1620s
SIG n.
a Saxon word signifying victory. is used in names, as in Sigbert, bright victory. In answers to the Greek vix in Nicander, and the Latin vic, in Victorinus.
sig Strong’s No.:H7873 pursuing
Transliteration: ώîyg
Pronunciation: seeg
Definition: From H7734; a withdrawl (into a private place): – pursuing.
Occurences: pursuing (1)

1 Kings 18:27 Kjv. And it came to pass at noon, that Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud: for he is a god; either he is talking, or he is pursuing, or he is in a journey, or peradventure he sleepeth, and must be awaked.

pursuing(Webster’s 1828 Dictionary)
pursuing ppr. Following; chasing; hastening after to overtake; prosecuting; proceeding in; continuing.

Gary Rendsburg’s paper (The Mock of Baal in 1 Kings 18:27) The Catholic Biblical Quarterly 1988. Vol 50, No.3

“In short there is good reason to conclude that both elements in the hendiadys, siah and sig, refer to excretion…”

nay
word of negation, late 12c., from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse nei, compound of ne “not” (see un-) + ei “ever” (see aye.
, ; adv.No, not; non.
Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional na,
na, conj. Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional (north-west.) 19– na. Etymology : Perhaps formed within English, by compounding. Etymons: English na , no conj.
tau (Τ τ) :
nineteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, from Hebrew taw, last letter of the Hebrew alphabet, literally “sign, mark.”
In ancient times, Tau was used as a symbol for life and/or resurrection, whereas the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, theta, was considered the symbol of death.
In Biblical times, the Taw was put on men to distinguish those who lamented sin, although newer versions of the Bible have replaced the ancient term “Taw” with “mark” (Ezekiel 9:4) or “signature” (Job 31:35).

The sign of the cross. The mark of Cain… The image of containment or suppression
Letter Perfect p301.
David Sacks. 2003 ISBN 0-7679-1173-3

ur, (n). An inarticulate sound, uttered instead of a word that the speaker is unable to remember or bring out.
úre gen. pl. of personal pronoun of first person. Of us Adam can yfel and gód, swá swá úre sum (quasi unus ex nobis ), Gen. 3, 22.
úre adj. pronoun. I. our
ure, n.1
Etymology: Anglo-Norman *eure, = Old French uevre , euvre , evre (13th cent.; French œuvre ) Latin opera opera n.2(Show Less)
I. in ure:
a. In or into use, practice, or performance. Often with vbs., as bring, come, have, and esp. put (freq. c1510–1630). Also rarely with into.
b. With dependent infinitive.
c. With reference to statutes, etc.: In or into effect, force, or operation. Chiefly with vbs., esp. put.
d. In remembrance or recollection. Only to have..in ure.
e. In or into a state of prevalence or existence. Chiefly with vbs., as come, draw, put.
ure, suffix2
Etymology: French -ure (in e.g. dasyure dasyure n.) and its etymon scientific Latin -urus (also -ura: see note) : ancient Greek οὐρά tail (see uro- comb. form2).
Scientific Latin -urus is found in genus names from 1758 (e.g. Trichiurus trichiure n. at trichiurid n. Derivatives) and -ura from 1764 (e.g. Xiphosura xiphosure n. at xiphosuran adj. and n. Derivatives).
Re
“with reference to,” used from c. 1700 in legalese, from Latin (in) re “in the matter of,” from ablative case of res “matter, thing.” Its use is execrated by Fowler in three different sections of “Modern English Usage.”
Ra
Ra or Re is the ancient Egyptian sun god. By the Fifth Dynasty in the 25th & 24th centuries, he had become a major god in ancient Egyptian religion, identified primarily with the noon sun.
re
word-forming element meaning “back to the original place; again, anew, once more,” also with a sense of “undoing,” c. 1200, from Old French and directly from Latin re- “again, back, anew, against,” “Latin combining form conceivably from Indo-European *wret-, metathetical variant of *wert- “to turn” [Watkins]. Often merely intensive, and in many of the older borrowings from French and Latin the precise sense of re- is lost in secondary senses or weakened beyond recognition. OED writes that it is “impossible to attempt a complete record of all the forms resulting from its use,” and adds that “The number of these is practically infinite ….” The Latin prefix became red- before vowels and h-, as in redact, redeem, redolent, redundant.

nature n.
late 13c., “restorative powers of the body, bodily processes; powers of growth;” from Old French nature “nature, being, principle of life; character, essence,” from Latin natura “course of things; natural character, constitution, quality; the universe,” literally “birth,” from natus “born,” past participle of nasci “to be born,” from PIE *gene- “to give birth, beget” (see genus).

Nature Greek: phusis – Strong’s No.:g5449
from phuo, “to bring forth, produce,” signifies
(a) “the nature” (i.e., the natural powers of constitution) of a person or thing, Eph 2:3; Jam 3:7 (“kind”); 2Pe 1:4;
(b) “origin, birth,” Rom 2:27, one who by birth is a Gentile, uncircumcised, in contrast to one who, though circumcised, has become spiritually uncircumcised by his iniquity; Gal 2:15;
(c) “the regular law or order of nature,” Rom 1:26, against “nature” (para, “against”); Rom 2:14, adverbially, “by nature” (for Rom 11:21, 24, see NATURAL, Note); 1Cr 11:14; Gal 4:8, “by nature (are no gods),” here “nature” is the emphatic word, and the phrase includes demons, men regarded as deified, and idols; these are gods only in name (the negative, me, denies not simply that they were gods, but the possibility that they could be).


evil adj.
Old English yfel (Kentish evel) “bad, vicious, ill, wicked,” from Proto-Germanic ubilaz (cognates: Old Saxon ubil, Old Frisian and Middle Dutch evel, Dutch euvel, Old High German ubil, German übel, Gothic ubils), from PIE *upelo-, from root *wap- “bad, evil” (cognates: Hittite huwapp- “evil”).

In Old English and other older Germanic languages other than Scandinavian, “this word is the most comprehensive adjectival expression of disapproval, dislike or disparagement” [OED]. Evil was the word the Anglo-Saxons used where we would use bad, cruel, unskillful, defective (adj.), or harm n., crime, misfortune, disease n.. In Middle English, bad took the wider range of senses and evil began to focus on moral badness. Both words have good as their opposite. Evil-favored (1520s) meant “ugly.” Evilchild is attested as an English surname from 13c.

The adverb is Old English yfele, originally of words or speech. Also as a noun in Old English,
“what is bad; sin, wickedness; anything that causes injury, morally or physically.”

Especially of a malady or disease from c. 1200. The meaning “extreme moral wickedness” was one of the senses of the Old English noun, but it did not become established as the main sense of the modern word until 18c. As a noun, Middle English also had evilty. Related: Evilly. Evil eye (Latin oculus malus) was Old English eage yfel. The jocular notion of an evil twin as an excuse for regrettable deeds is by 1986, American English, from an old motif in mythology.


god n.
Old English god “supreme being, deity; the Christian God; image of a god; godlike person,” from Proto-Germanic guthan (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Dutch god, Old High German got, German Gott, Old Norse guð, Gothic guþ), from PIE ghut– “that which is invoked” (cognates: Old Church Slavonic zovo “to call,” Sanskrit huta- “invoked,” an epithet of Indra), from root *gheu(e)- “to call, invoke.”

I want my lawyer, my tailor, my servants, even my wife to believe in God, because it means that I shall be cheated and robbed and cuckolded less often. … If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him. [Voltaire]

  1. Any person or thing exalted too much in estimation, or deified and honored as the chief good.

graven adj.
“sculpted, carved,” late 14c., past participle adjective from grave (v.) + -en (1).

Exodus 20:4 Kjb
Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth.


similitude n.
late 14c., from Old French similitude “similarity, relationship, comparison” (13c.) and directly from Latin similitudinem (nominative similitudo) “likeness, resemblance,” from similis “like” (see similar).
verisimilitude n.
“appearance of truth or reality, likelihood,” c. 1600, from French verisimilitude (1540s), from Latin verisimilitudo “likeness to truth,” from veri, genitive of verum, neuter of verus “true” (see very) + similis “like, similar” (see similar). Related: Verisimilar.

image n.
c. 1200, “piece of statuary; artificial representation that looks like a person or thing,” from Old French image “image, likeness; figure, drawing, portrait; reflection; statue,” earlier imagene (11c.), from Latin imaginem (nominative imago) “copy, imitation, likeness; statue, picture,” also “phantom, ghost, apparition,” figuratively “idea, appearance,” from stem of imitari “to copy, imitate” (see imitation).

To þe ymage of god he made hym [Gen. i:27, Wycliffite Bible, early version, 1382]

Meaning “reflection in a mirror” is early 14c. The mental sense was in Latin, and appears in English late 14c. Sense of “public impression” is attested in isolated cases from 1908 but not in common use until its rise in the jargon of advertising and public relations, c. 1958.


Deuteronomy 4:16 Kjb
Lest ye corrupt yourselves, and make you a graven image, the similitude of any figure, the likeness of male or female,


wizard of id


coincide v.
1705, “be identical in substance or nature,” but from 1640s as a verb in English in Latin form, “occupy the same space, agree in position,” from Medieval Latin coincidere (used in astrology), literally “to fall upon together,” from Latin com- “together” (see co-) + incidere “to fall upon” (in- “upon” + cadere “to fall;” see case (n.1)). From 1809 as “occur at the same time.” Related: Coincided; coinciding.
cide
word-forming element meaning “killer,” from French -cide, from Latin -cida “cutter, killer, slayer,” from -cidere, comb. form of caedere “to strike down, chop, beat, hew, fell, slay,” from PIE kae-id-, from root *(s)k(h)ai- “to strike” (Pokorny, not in Watkins; cognates: Sanskrit skhidati “beats, tears,” Lithuanian kaisti “shave,” German heien “beat”). For Latin vowel change, see acquisition. The element also can represent “killing,” from French –cide*, from Latin -cidium “a cutting, a killing.”


ism n.
“distinctive doctrine, theory, or practice,” 1670s, the suffix -ism used as an independent word, chiefly disparagingly. Related: Ismatical. By the same path, ist is from 1811.
ism
word-forming element making nouns implying a practice, system, doctrine, etc., from French -isme or directly from Latin -isma, -ismus (source also of Italian, Spanish -ismo, Dutch, German -ismus), from Greek -ismos, noun ending signifying the practice or teaching of a thing, from the stem of verbs in -izein, a verb-forming element denoting the doing of the noun or adjective to which it is attached. For distinction of use, see -ity. The related Greek suffix -isma(t)- affects some forms.


Confessions Of A Former Truther


Proverbs 20:17 Kjb
Bread of deceit is sweet to a man; but afterwards his mouth shall be filled with gravel.

2014 show 234 oct 15

Clint returns from Holidays this evening with a beautiful story + I’M MAD AS HELL AND I’M NOT GONNA TAKE THIS ANYMORE.

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Tonight’s topic among others: The show has been running for just over a year, Happy one year anniversary Corporation nation and an Analysis of Matthew  6 .. The Lord’s Prayer and over population (Not) and shooting from the hip and  a rant about weirdo bastards @ 00H:12m:24s and;

Matthew 6 Wycliffe Bible (WYC)

6 Take heed, that ye do not your rightwiseness before men, to be seen of them, else ye shall have no meed at your Father that is in heavens [else ye shall not have meed of your Father which is in heavens].

2 Therefore when thou doest alms, do not thou trumpet before thee, as hypocrites do in synagogues and streets, that they be worshipped of men[a]; soothly I say to you, they have received their meed.

3 But when thou doest alms, know not thy left hand what thy right hand doeth,

4 that thine alms be in huddles, and thy Father that seeth in huddles, shall requite thee [shall yield to thee].

5 And when ye pray, ye shall not be as hypocrites, that love to pray standing in synagogues and [in] corners of streets, to be seen of men [that they be seen of men]; truly I say to you, they have received their meed.

6 But when thou shalt pray, enter into thy bedchamber, and when the door is shut, pray thy Father in huddles, and thy Father that seeth in huddles, shall yield to thee.

7 But in praying do not ye speak much, as heathen men do, for they guess that they be heard in their much speech.

8 Therefore do not ye be made like to them, for your Father knoweth what is need to you [for your Father knoweth what is needful to you], before that ye ask him.

9 And thus ye shall pray, Our Father that art in heavens, hallowed be thy name;

10 thy kingdom come to; be thy will done in earth as it is in heaven[b];

11 give to us this day our each day’s bread;

12 and forgive to us our debts, as we forgive to our debtors;

13 and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

14 For if ye forgive to men their sins, your heavenly Father shall forgive to you your trespasses.

@ 00H:10m:25s

constitution (n.)
mid-14c., “law, regulation, edict,” from Old French constitucion (12c.) “constitution, establishment,” and directly from Latin constitutionem (nominative constitutio) “act of settling, settled condition, anything arranged or settled upon, regulation, order, ordinance,” from constitut-, past participle stem of constituere (see constitute).
unconscionable (adj.)
1560s, “showing no regard for conscience,” from un- (1) + now rare conscionable “conscientious.” Related: Unconscionably.
conscionable (adj.)
1540s, from conscioned “having a conscience” (from conscience) + -able; obsolete from early 18c. but fossilized in its negative, unconscionable.
scapegoat (n.)
1530, “goat sent into the wilderness on the Day of Atonement, symbolic bearer of the sins of the people,” coined by Tyndale from scape (n.1) + goat to translate Latin caper emissarius, itself a translation in Vulgate of Hebrew ‘azazel (Lev. xvi:8,10,26), which was read as ‘ez ozel “goat that departs,” but which others hold to be the proper name of a devil or demon in Jewish mythology (sometimes identified with Canaanite deity Aziz).

Jerome’s reading also was followed by Martin Luther (der ledige Bock), Symmachus (tragos aperkhomenos), and others (compare French bouc émissaire), but the question of who, or what (or even where) is meant by ‘azazel is a vexed one. The Revised Version (1884) simply restores Azazel. But the old translation has its modern defenders:

Azazel is an active participle or participial noun, derived ultimately from azal (connected with the Arabic word azala, and meaning removed), but immediately from the reduplicate form of that verb, azazal. The reduplication of the consonants of the root in Hebrew and Arabic gives the force of repetition, so that while azal means removed, azalzal means removed by a repetition of acts. Azalzel or azazel, therefore, means one who removes by a series of acts. … The interpretation is founded on sound etymological grounds, it suits the context wherever the word occurs, it is consistent with the remaining ceremonial of the Day of Atonement, and it accords with the otherwise known religious beliefs and symbolical practices of the Israelites. [Rev. F. Meyrick, “Leviticus,” London, 1882]

Meaning “one who is blamed or punished for the mistakes or sins of others” first recorded 1824; the verb is attested from 1943. Related: Scapegoated; scapegoating. For the formation, compare scapegrace, also scape-gallows “one who deserves hanging.”

scapegrace (n.)
1767, from scape (v.) + grace (n.); as if “one who escapes the grace of God.” Possibly influenced by scapegoat.
whore (n.)
1530s spelling alteration (see wh-) of Middle English hore, from Old English hore “prostitute, harlot,” from Proto-Germanic *horaz (fem. *horon-) “one who desires” (cognates: Old Norse hora “adulteress,” Danish hore, Swedish hora, Dutch hoer, Old High German huora “whore;” in Gothic only in the masc. hors “adulterer, fornicator,” also as a verb, horinon “commit adultery”), from PIE *ka- “to like, desire,” a base that has produced words in other languages for “lover” (cognates: Latin carus “dear;” Old Irish cara “friend;” Old Persian kama “desire;” Sanskrit Kama, name of the Hindu god of love, kamah “love, desire,” the first element in Kama Sutra).

Whore itself is perhaps a Germanic euphemism for a word that has not survived. The Old English vowel naturally would have yielded *hoor, which is the pronunciation in some dialects; it might have shifted by influence of Middle English homonym hore “physical filth, slime,” also “moral corruption, sin,” from Old English horh. The wh- form became current 16c. A general term of abuse for an unchaste or lewd woman (without regard to money) from at least c. 1200. Of male prostitutes from 1630s. Whore of Babylon is from Rev. xvii:1, 5, etc. In Middle English with occasional plural forms horen, heoranna.

The word, with its derivatives, is now avoided polite speech; its survival in literature, so as it survives, is due to the fact that it is a favorite word with Shakspere (who uses it, with its derivatives, 99 times) and is common in the authorized English version of the Bible … though the American revisers recommended the substitution of harlot as less gross …. [Century Dictionary]

Some equivalent words in other languages also derive from sources not originally pejorative, such as Bohemian nevestka, diminutive of nevesta “bride;” Dutch deern, German dirne originally “girl, lass, wench;” also perhaps Old French pute, perhaps literally “girl,” fem. of Vulgar Latin *puttus (but perhaps rather from Latin putidus “stinking;” see poontang). Welsh putain “whore” is from French, probably via Middle English. Among other languages, Greek porne “prostitute” is related to pernemi “sell,” with an original notion probably of a female slave sold for prostitution; Latin meretrix is literally “one who earns wages” (source of Irish mertrech, Old English miltestre “whore, prostitute”).

The vulgar Roman word was scortum, literally “skin, hide.” Another term was lupa, literally “she-wolf” (preserved in Spanish loba, Italian lupa, French louve; see wolf (n.)). And of course there was prostituta, literally “placed in front,” thus “publicly exposed,” from the fem. past participle of prostituere (see prostitute (n.)). Another Old Norse term was skækja, which yielded Danish skøge, Swedish sköka; probably from Middle Low German schoke, which is perhaps from schode “foreskin of a horse’s penis,” perhaps with the sense of “skin” (compare Latin scortum) or perhaps via an intermediary sense of “vagina.” Spanish ramera, Portuguese ramiera are from fem. form of ramero “young bird of prey,” literally “little branch,” from ramo “branch.” Breton gast is cognate with Welsh gast “bitch,” of uncertain origin. Compare also strumpet, harlot.

Old Church Slavonic ljubodejica is from ljuby dejati “fornicate,” a compound from ljuby “love” + dejati “put, perform.” Russian bljad “whore” derives from Old Church Slavonic bladinica, from bladu “fornication.” Polish nierządnica is literally “disorderly woman.” Sanskrit vecya is a derivation of veca- “house, dwelling,” especially “house of ill-repute, brothel.” Another term, pumccali, means literally “one who runs after men.” Avestan jahika is literally “woman,” but only of evil creatures; another term is kunairi, from pejorative prefix ku- + nairi “woman.”

whore-monger (n.)
1520s, from whore (n.) + monger (n.). A Petrus Hurmonger is in the 1327 Leicestershire Lay Subsidy Rolls.

Ephesians 6:12Wycliffe Bible (WYC)

12 For why striving is not to us against flesh and blood, but against princes and potentates, against governors of the world of these darknesses, against spiritual things of wickedness, in heavenly things.

con (v.2)
“to swindle,” 1896, from con (adj.). Related: Conned; conning.
con (n.1)
“negation” (mainly in pro and con), 1570s, short for Latin contra “against” (see contra).
con-
word-forming element meaning “together, with,” sometimes merely intensive; the form of com- used in Latin before consonants except -b-, -p-, -l-, -m-, or -r-. In native English formations (such as costar), co- tends to be used where Latin would use con-.
sense (n.)
c. 1400, “faculty of perception,” also “meaning, import, interpretation” (especially of Holy Scripture), from Old French sens “one of the five senses; meaning; wit, understanding” (12c.) and directly from Latin sensus “perception, feeling, undertaking, meaning,” from sentire “perceive, feel, know,” probably a figurative use of a literally meaning “to find one’s way,” or “to go mentally,” from PIE root *sent- “to go” (cognates: Old High German sinnan “to go, travel, strive after, have in mind, perceive,” German Sinn “sense, mind,” Old English sið “way, journey,” Old Irish set, Welsh hynt “way”). Application to any one of the external or outward senses (touch, sight, hearing, etc.) in English first recorded 1520s.

A certain negro tribe has a special word for “see;” but only one general word for “hear,” “touch,” “smell,” and “taste.” It matters little through which sense I realize that in the dark I have blundered into a pig-sty. In French “sentir” means to smell, to touch, and to feel, all together. [Erich M. von Hornbostel, “Die Einheit der Sinne” (“The Unity of the Senses”), 1927]

Meaning “that which is wise” is from c. 1600. Meaning “capacity for perception and appreciation” is from c. 1600 (as in sense of humor, attested by 1783, sense of shame, 1640s).

us (pron.)
Old English us (cognate with Old Saxon, Old Frisian us, Old Norse, Swedish oss, Dutch ons, German uns), accusative and dative plural of we, from PIE *nes- (2), forming oblique cases of the first person plural personal pronoun (cognates: Sanskrit nas, Avestan na, Hittite nash “us;” Greek no “we two;” Latin nos “we, us;” Old Church Slavonic ny “us,” nasu “our;” Old Irish ni, Welsh ni “we, us”). The -n- is preserved in Germanic in Dutch ons, German uns.

I’M MAD AS HELL AND I”M NOT GONNA TAKE THIS ANYMORE

I don’t have to tell you things are bad. Everybody knows things are bad. It’s a depression. Everybody’s out of work or scared of losing their job. The dollar buys a nickel’s worth, banks are going bust, shopkeepers keep a gun under the counter. Punks are running wild in the street and there’s nobody anywhere who seems to know what to do, and there’s no end to it. We know the air is unfit to breathe and our food is unfit to eat, and we sit watching our TV’s while some local newscaster tells us that today we had fifteen homicides and sixty-three violent crimes, as if that’s the way it’s supposed to be. We know things are bad – worse than bad. They’re crazy. It’s like everything everywhere is going crazy, so we don’t go out anymore. We sit in the house, and slowly the world we are living in is getting smaller, and all we say is, ‘Please, at least leave us alone in our living rooms. Let me have my toaster and my TV and my steel-belted radials and I won’t say anything. Just leave us alone.’ Well, I’m not gonna leave you alone. I want you to get mad! I don’t want you to protest. I don’t want you to riot – I don’t want you to write to your congressman because I wouldn’t know what to tell you to write. I don’t know what to do about the depression and the inflation and the Russians and the crime in the street. All I know is that first you’ve got to get mad. You’ve got to say, ‘I’m a HUMAN BEING, God damn it! My life has VALUE!’ So I want you to get up now. I want all of you to get up out of your chairs. I want you to get up right now and go to the window. Open it, and stick your head out, and yell, ‘I’M AS MAD AS HELL, AND I’M NOT GOING TO TAKE THIS ANYMORE!’ I want you to get up right now, sit up, go to your windows, open them and stick your head out and yell – ‘I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore!’ Things have got to change. But first, you’ve gotta get mad!… You’ve got to say, ‘I’m as mad as hell, and I’m not going to take this anymore!’ Then we’ll figure out what to do about the depression and the inflation and the oil crisis. But first get up out of your chairs, open the window, stick your head out, and yell, and say it: “I’M AS MAD AS HELL, AND I’M NOT GOING TO TAKE THIS ANYMORE!”

2014 show 215 sept 17

The Borg are a collection of species that have been turned into cybernetic organisms functioning as drones in a hive mind called “The Collective”.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Were gonna get into some serious bible study today and tackle the Book of Proverbs and

“The Book of Proverbs is about godly wisdom, how to get it and how to use it. It’s about priorities and principles, not get-rich-quick schemes or success formulas. It tells you, not how to make a living, but how to be skillful in the lost art of making a life.” Warren W. Wiersbe, Be Skillful, p. 7.
Notes on Proverbs 2015 Edition The proverbs of Solomon the son of David, king of Israel; To know wisdom and instruction; to perceive the words of understanding; To receive the instruction of wisdom, justice, and judgment, and equity; …


proverb (n.) c. 1300, in boke of Prouerbyys, the Old Testament work, from Old French proverbe (12c.) and directly from Latin proverbium “a common saying, old adage, maxim,” literally “words put forward,” from pro- “forth” (see pro-) + verbum “word” (see verb). Used generally from late 14c. The Book of Proverbs in Old English was cwidboc, from cwide “speech, saying, proverb, homily,” related to cwiddian “to talk, speak, say, discuss;” cwiddung “speech, saying, report.”
word-forming element meaning “forward, forth, toward the front” (as in proclaim, proceed); “beforehand, in advance” (prohibit, provide); “taking care of” (procure); “in place of, on behalf of” (proconsul, pronoun); from Latin pro “on behalf of, in place of, before, for, in exchange for, just as,” which also was used as a prefix.

Also in some cases from cognate Greek pro “before, in front of, sooner,” which also was used in Greek as a prefix (as in pr o blem). Both the Latin and Greek words are from PIE *pro- (cognates: Sanskrit pra- “before, forward, forth;” Gothic faura “before,” Old English fore “before, for, on account of,” fram “forward, from;” Old Irish roar “enough”), extended form of root *per- (1) “forward, through” (see per).

The common modern sense “in favor of, favoring” (pro-independence, pro-fluoridation, pro-Soviet, etc.) was not in classical Latin and is attested in English from early 19c.

verb (n.) late 14c., from Old French verbe “word; word of God; saying; part of speech that expresses action or being” (12c.) and directly from Latin verbum “verb,” originally “a word,” from PIE root *were- (3) “to speak” (cognates: Avestan urvata- “command;” Sanskrit vrata- “command, vow;” Greek rhetor “public speaker,” rhetra “agreement, covenant,” eirein “to speak, say;” Hittite weriga- “call, summon;” Lithuanian vardas “name;” Gothic waurd, Old English word “word”).


BORG : In Saxon law. A pledge, pledge giver, or surety. The name given among the Saxons to the head of each family composing a tithing or decen­nary, each being the pledge for the good conduct of the others. Also the contract or engagement of suretyship ; and the pledge given.
BORGBRICHE :
A breach or violation of surety­ ship, or of mutual fidelity. Jacob.
BORGESMON :
In Saxon law. The name given to the head of each family composing a tithing.

Blacks law fourth edition : B

borg : Same as borgh.
borgh. 1. See BORG. 2. See BORROW. (Blacks 9th)
borrow, n. A frankpledge. Also spelled borgh; borh.
See DECENARY; FRANKPLEDGE

decenary. [fro Latin decena “a tithing”] Hist. A town
or district consisting of ten freeholding families. – A freeholder of the decenary (a decennarius) was bound by frankpledge to produce any wrongdoer living in the decenary. – Also spelled (incorrectly) decennary. ­
Also termed decmna; tithing. Cf. FRANKPLEDGE.
“The civil division of the territory of England is into counties, of those counties into hundreds, of those hundreds into tithings or towns. Which division, as it now stands, seems to owe its original to king Alfred; who, to prevent the rapines (plunder) and disorders which formerly prevailed in the realm, instituted tithings; so called from the Saxon, because ten freeholders, with their families, composed one.
These all dwelt together, and were sureties or free pledges to the king for the good behavior of each other; and, if any offence was committed in their district, they were bound to have the offender forthcoming. And there­ fore anciently no man was suffered to abide in England above forty days, unless he were enrolled in some tithing or decennary.” 1 William Blackstone, Commentaries on the
Laws of England 110 (1765).


Are we Prisoners of War?

Conflicts not of an international character
Geneva, 12 August 1949 Conventions and Additional Protocols, and their Commentaries

In the case of armed conflict not of an international character occurring in the territory of one of the High Contracting Parties, each Party to the conflict shall be bound to apply, as a minimum, the following provisions:
(1) Persons taking no active part in the hostilities, including members of armed forces who have laid down their arms and those placed ‘ hors de combat ‘ (outside the fight) by sickness, wounds, detention, or any other cause, shall in all circumstances be treated humanely, without any adverse distinction founded on race, colour, religion or faith, sex, birth or wealth, or any other similar criteria.
To this end, the following acts are and shall remain prohibited at any time and in any place whatsoever with respect to the above-mentioned persons:

demobilize ~ verb rare
1. release from military service or remove from the active list of military service
2. retire from military service


Superfluity
SUPERFLU’ITY, noun [Latin superfluitas; super and fluo, to flow.]
1. Superabundance; a greater quantity than is wanted; as a superfluity of water or provisions.

  1. Something that is beyond what is wanted; something rendered unnecessary by its abundance. Among the superfluities of life we seldom number the abundance of money.

money (n.) mid-13c., “coinage, metal currency,” from Old French monoie “money, coin, currency; change” (Modern French monnaie), from Latin moneta “place for coining money, mint; coined money, money, coinage,” from Moneta, a title or surname of the Roman goddess Juno, in or near whose temple money was coined; perhaps from monere “advise, warn” (see monitor (n.)), with the sense of “admonishing goddess,” which is sensible, but the etymology is difficult. Extended early 19c. to include paper money.

The Juno awards
As Juno Moneta (“the Warner”), she had a temple on the Arx (the northern summit of the Capitoline Hill) from 344 bc; it later housed the Roman mint, and the words “mint” and “money” derive from the name.

  1. Military. the code name for a beach on France’s Normandy coast, attacked by Canadian forces as part of the Allies’ D-day invasion on June 6, 1944. – Juno Beach is the second of the three invasion sectors of the Commonwealth forces. Here land the Canadians

Temple of Juno Moneta


Other historical references to the term Juno MONETA

A time of Richard I. Stim. Law Gloss. http://thelawdictionary.org/moneta

Henry II, King of England: The Saladin Tithe, 1188


Mammon (n.)**
“personification of wealth,” mid-14c., from Late Latin mammona, from Greek mamonas, from Aramaic mamona, mamon “riches, gain;” left untranslated in Greek New Testament (e.g. Matt. vi:24, Luke xvi:9-13) retained in the Vulgate, and regarded mistakenly by medieval Christians as the name of a demon.

show 192 aug 13

Clint is back tonight with special guests, Vengeance, Tyranny, Harm & Pain, Dan is keeping a breast on Titular, The Fictionary.

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Tonight’s topic among others: What about a new book? The Fictionary … written by Clint and Daniel and the word for tonight: Insinuate! Design to place something in someone else’s mind that is not true, but seems to be and;


insinuate v.
1520s, “to covertly and subtly introduce into the mind or heart” (trans.), from Latin insinuatus, past participle of insinuare “to thrust in, push in, make a way; creep in, intrude, bring in by windings and curvings, wind one’s way into,” from in- “in” (see in- (2)) + sinuare “to wind, bend, curve,” from sinus “a curve, winding” (see sinus).

Intransitive meaning “hint obliquely” is from 1560s. Meaning “maneuver (someone or something) into some desired position or condition” is from 1570s. Physical or literal sense of “to introduce tortuously or indirectly” is from 1640s. Related: Insinuated; insinuating.
1. To gain on the affections by gentle or artful means, or by imperceptible degrees; as insinuating flattery.

in adj.
“that is within, internal,” 1590s, from in (adv.). Sense of “holding power” (the in party) first recorded c. 1600; that of “exclusive” (the in-crowd, an in-joke) is from 1907 (in-group); that of “stylish, fashionable” (the in thing) is from 1960.
S Shin (also spelled Šin (šīn) or Sheen) literally means “teeth“, “press“, and “sharp“; It is the twenty-first letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Shin Phoenician sin.svg, Hebrew Shin.
Hebrew Alphabet – Letters of the Alefbet / Shin
The Phoenician letter gave rise to the Greek Sigma (Σ) (which in turn gave Latin S
Sigma while “sigma” was a Greek innovation that simply meant “hissing“.
sin n.
Old English synn “moral wrongdoing, injury, mischief, enmity, feud, guilt, crime, offense against God, misdeed,” from Proto-Germanic *sun(d)jo- “sin” (cognates: Old Saxon sundia, Old Frisian sende, Middle Dutch sonde, Dutch zonde, German Sünde “sin, transgression, trespass, offense,” extended forms), probably ultimately “it is true,” i.e. “the sin is real” (compare Gothic sonjis, Old Norse sannr “true”), from PIE *snt-ya-, a collective form from *es-ont- “becoming,” present participle of root *es- “to be” (see is).
ewe n.
Old English eowu “female sheep,” fem. of eow “sheep,” from Proto-Germanic *awi, genitive *awjoz (cognates: Old Saxon ewi, Old Frisian ei, Middle Dutch ooge, Dutch ooi, Old High German ouwi “sheep,” Gothic aweþi “flock of sheep”), from PIE *owi- “sheep” (cognates: Sanskrit avih, Greek ois, Latin ovis, Lithuanian avis “sheep,” Old Church Slavonic ovica “ewe,” Old Irish oi “sheep,” Welsh ewig “hind”).
sinew n.
Old English seonowe, oblique form of nominative sionu “sinew,” from Proto-Germanic *senawo (cognates: Old Saxon sinewa, Old Norse sina, Old Frisian sine, Middle Dutch senuwe, Dutch zenuw, Old High German senawa, German Sehne), from PIE root *sai- “to tie, bind” (cognates: Sanskrit snavah “sinew,” Avestan snavar, Irish sin “chain”).
Ate
Greek goddess of infatuation and evil, from ate “infatuation, bane, ruin, mischief,” which is of uncertain origin.
ate
past tense of eat (q.v.).


Genesis 3 Wyc
12 And Adam said, The woman which thou gavest fellow to me, gave me of the tree, and I ate.
13 And the Lord said to the woman, Why didest thou this thing? The which answered, The serpent deceived me, and I ate.


concept n. 1550s, from Medieval Latin conceptum “draft, abstract,” in classical Latin “(a thing) conceived,” from concep-, past participle stem of concipere “to take in” (see conceive). In some 16c. cases a refashioning of conceit (perhaps to avoid negative connotations).
con (v.2) “to swindle,” 1896, from con (adj.). Related: Conned; conning.
con (n.1) “negation” (mainly in pro and con), 1570s, short for Latin contra “against” (see contra).
con– word-forming element meaning “together, with,” sometimes merely intensive; the form of com- used in Latin before consonants except -b-, -p-, -l-, -m-, or -r-. In native English formations (such as costar), co- tends to be used where Latin would use con-.
sept n. 1540s, “enclosed area,” from Latin septum (see septum). As “division of a nation or tribe,” 1510s, “prob. a var. of sect” [OED].
septi– before vowels sept-, word-forming element meaning “seven,” from Latin septem (see seven).


bosom n.
Old English bosm “breast; womb; surface; ship’s hold,” from West Germanic *bosm- (cognates: Old Frisian bosm, Old Saxon bosom, Middle Dutch boesem, Dutch boezem, Old High German buosam, German Busen “bosom, breast”), perhaps from PIE root *bhou- “to grow, swell,” or *bhaghus “arm” (in which case the primary notion would be “enclosure formed by the breast and the arms”). Narrowed meaning “a woman’s breasts” is from 1959; but bosomy “big-breasted” is from 1928. Bosom-friend is attested 1580s; bosom buddy from 1920s.


titular adj.
1590s, from or based on Middle French titulaire (16c.), from Latin titulus (see title) + -ar. Related: Titulary.

Sales of Slaves.
Slave dealers usually offered their wares at public auction sales (Fig. 29). These were under the supervision of the aediles, who appointed the place and made rules and regulations to govern them. A tax was imposed on imported slaves and they were offered for sale with their feet whitened with chalk; those from the east had also their ears bored, a common sign of slavery among oriental peoples. As bids were asked for each slave he was made to mount a stone or platform, corresponding to the “block” familiar to the readers of our own history.
From his neck hung a scroll (titulus), setting forth his character and serving as a warrant for the purchaser. If the slave had defects not made known in this warrant the vendor was bound to take him back within six months or make good the loss to the buyer.
The chief items in the titulus were the age and nationality of the slave, and his freedom from such common defects as chronic ill-health, especially epilepsy, and tendencies to thievery, running away, and suicide. In spite of the guarantee the purchaser took care to examine the slaves as closely as possible.
For this reason they were commonly stripped, made to move around, handled freely by the purchaser, and even examined by physicians. If no warrant was given by the dealer, a cap (pilleus) was put on the slave’s head at the time of the sale and the purchaser took all risks. The dealer might also offer the slaves at private sale, and this was the rule in the case of all of unusual value and especially of marked personal beauty…
The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Private Life of the Romans, by Harold Whetstone Johnston. The Private Life of the Romans

title v.
“to furnish with a title,” early 14c., from title n.. Related: Titled; titling.
to furnish with a title,” early 14c., from title n.. Related: Titled; titling.


Job 32 Kjv
21 Let me not, I pray you, accept any man’s person, neither let me give flattering titles unto man.
22 For I know not to give flattering titles; in so doing my maker would soon take me away.

Job 32 Wyc
21 I shall not take the person of a man, and I shall not make God even to man.
22 For I know not how long I shall abide alive, and if my Maker will take me away after a little time.


defect n.
early 15c., from Middle French defect and directly from Latin defectus “failure, revolt, falling away,” noun use of past participle of deficere “to fail, desert” (see deficient).


Bouvier’s Law Revised 6th Edition – Sec.C .pdf

CHRISTIANITY. The religion established by Jesus Christ.
2. Christianity has been judicially declared to be a part of the common law of Pennsylvania; 11 Serg. & Rawle,
394; 5 Binn. R.555; of New York, 8 Johns. R. 291; of Connecticut, 2 Swift’s System, 321; of Massachusetts,
Dane’s Ab. vol. 7, c. 219, a. 2, 19. To write or speak contemptuously and maliciously against it, is an indictable
offence. Vide Cooper on the Law of Libel, 59 and 114, et seq.; and generally, 1 Russ. on Cr. 217; 1 Hawk, c. 5; 1
Vent. 293; 3 Keb. 607; 1 Barn. & Cress. 26. S. C. 8 Eng. Com. Law R. 14; Barnard. 162; Fitzgib. 66; Roscoe, Cr.
Ev. 524; 2 Str. 834; 3 Barn. & Ald. 161; S. C. 5 Eng. Com. Law R. 249 Jeff. Rep. Appx. See 1 Cro. Jac. 421 Vent.
293; 3 Keb. 607; Cooke on Def. 74; 2 How. S. C. 11−ep. 127, 197 to 201.

Christianity. The religion of those who believe that Jesus Christ is the true Messiah and the Savior of men, and who receive the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments as the word of God. Hale v Everett, 53 NH 9.
Christian name. The name given a person at his birth or formal christening, sometimes referred to as a first name in distinction
from the surname or family name which comes last. 38 Am J1st Name § 4.


Voluntary ignorance refers to unaware states that result from the neglect to take reasonable steps to acquire an important knowledge. This situation arises, when a party might by taking reasonable pain, have acquired the necessary knowledge, but neglected the same.

Voluntary ignorance constitutes negligence when the detection of danger can be accomplished by reasonable vigilance. [Forcier v. Grand Union Stores, 128 Vt. 389 (Vt. 1970)]. However, in Thompson v. Green Mountain Power Corp., 120 Vt. 478 (Vt. 1958), the court held “knowledge of the true facts may be essential to careful conduct, and where knowledge is required, voluntary ignorance is culpable and affords no protection from legal liability.”


confirmation n.
c. 1300, confyrmacyoun, the Church rite, from Old French confirmacion (13c.) “strengthening, confirmation; proof; ratification,” from Latin confirmationem (nominative confirmatio) “a securing, establishing; an assurance, encouragement,” noun of action from confirmare (see confirm). As a legal action, “verification, proof,” from late 14c.; as “action of making sure,” from late 15c.


artful adj.
1610s, “learned, well-versed in the (liberal) arts,” also “characterized by technical skill,” from art n. + -ful. Meaning “skilled in adapting means to ends” is from 1739. Related: Artfully; artfulness.

jargon n.
mid-14c., “unintelligible talk, gibberish; chattering, jabbering,” from Old French jargon “a chattering” (of birds), also “language, speech,” especially “idle talk; thieves’ Latin.” Ultimately of echoic origin (compare Latin garrire “to chatter,” English gargle). Often applied to something the speaker does not understand, hence meaning “mode of speech full of unfamiliar terms” (1650s). Middle English also had it as a verb, jargounen “to chatter” (late 14c.), from French.

definition n. rare
1. a concise explanation of the meaning of a word or phrase or symbol
2. clarity of outline
exercise had given his muscles superior definition


Words in Words Machine


liability n.
1790, originally a term in law; “condition of being legally liable;” see liable + -ity. General sense is from 1809; meaning “thing for which one is liable” is first attested 1842. Related: Liabilities.
lie (n.1)
“an untruth,” Old English lyge “lie, falsehood,” from Proto-Germanic *lugiz (cognates: Old Norse lygi, Danish løgn, Old Frisian leyne (fem.), Dutch leugen (fem.), Old High German lugi, German Lüge, Gothic liugn “a lie”), from the root of lie (v.1). To give the lie to “accuse directly of lying” is attested from 1590s. Lie-detector first recorded 1909.
ability
word-forming element expressing ability, fitness, or capacity, from Latin -abilitas, forming nouns from adjectives ending in -abilis (see -able). Not etymologically related to ability, though popularly connected with it.
able
word-forming element expressing ability, capacity, fitness, from French, from Latin -ibilis, -abilis, forming adjectives from verbs, properly -bilis (the vowels being generally from the stem of the word being suffixed), from PIE *-tro-, a suffix used to form nouns of instrument, cognate with the second syllables of rudder and saddle n..
In Latin, infinitives in -are took -abilis, others -ibilis; in English, -able tends to be used with native (and other non-Latin) words, -ible with words of obvious Latin origin (but there are exceptions). The Latin suffix is not etymologically connected with able, but it long has been popularly associated with it, and this has contributed to its survival as a living suffix.
Abel
masc. proper name, in Old Testament, second son of Adam and Eve, from Hebrew Hebhel, literally “breath,” also “vanity.”


benefit n.
late 14c., “good or noble deed,” also “advantage, profit,” from Anglo-French benfet “well-done,” from Latin benefactum “good deed,” from bene facere (see benefactor). Meaning “performance or entertainment to raise money for some charitable cause” is from 1680s.

benefice n.
c. 1300, “a church living,” from Old French benefice (13c.) and directly from Latin beneficium “a favor, service, generosity, kindness, benefit,” from beneficus “generous, kind, benevolent, obliging,” from bene- “good, well” (see bene-) + -ficus, from stem of -ficere, unstressed form of facere “to do, to make” (see factitious).


saurus
element used in forming dinosaur names, from Latinized comb. form of Greek sauros “lizard,” of unknown origin; possibly related to saulos “twisting, wavering.”


hieroglyph n.
“a figure of a familiar object representing a word or sound,” especially in the system of writing used on monuments, etc., in ancient Egypt, 1590s, a shortening of hieroglyphic n. “hieroglyphic character,” from hieroglyphic (adj.). Greek hieroglyphos meant “a carver of hieroglyphics.”
hiero-, comb. form
Forms: before a vowel hier-.
combining form of Greek ἱερός sacred, holy. See the following words
o, adv.
Forms: α. eOE aee, OE awa, OE awo, OE–eME aa, OE–eME (ME north.) a, lOE ha, eME æ. β. OE–ME o, OE–ME oo, eME oa, ME ho, ME hoo.
Etymology: A word inherited from Germanic.
Cognate with Old Saxon eo , io , Old High German eo , io , ieo , (Middle High German ie , German je ), Old Icelandic ǽ , ei , ey , Old Swedish ä , e , Gothic aiw < the same Germanic base as Old High German ēwīn eternity, Old Icelandic æfi an age, lifetime, Old Swedish äve lifetime (Swedish regional äva while, moment), Gothic aiws an age (perhaps compare also Old English ǣ , ǣw law, marriage, Old Frisian ēwa , ēwe law, Old Saxon ēo , ēu law, Old High German ēwa eternity, law (Middle High German ēwe , ē eternity, law, marriage, German Ehe marriage: see e n.2) < the same Indo-European base as Sanskrit āyus lifespan (see Ayurveda n.), ancient Greek αἰών lifetime, αἰεί (Epic) always, αἰέν always, classical Latin aevum an age, a long time.

glyph n.
1727, “ornamental groove in sculpture or architecture,” from French glyphe (1701), from Greek glyphe “a carving,” from glyphein “to hollow out, cut out with a knife, engrave, carve,” also “to note down” on tablets, from PIE root *gleubh- “to cut, slice, tear apart” (cognates: Latin glubere “to peel, shell, strip,” Old English cleofan “to cleave,” Old Norse klofi, Middle Dutch clove “a cleft”). Meaning “sculpted mark or symbol” (as in hieroglyph) is from 1825. Related: Glyphic.


witch n.
Old English wicce “female magician, sorceress,” in later use especially “a woman supposed to have dealings with the devil or evil spirits and to be able by their cooperation to perform supernatural acts,” fem. of Old English wicca “sorcerer, wizard, man who practices witchcraft or magic,” from verb wiccian “to practice witchcraft” (compare Low German wikken, wicken “to use witchcraft,” wikker, wicker “soothsayer”).
OED says of uncertain origin; Liberman says “None of the proposed etymologies of witch is free from phonetic or semantic difficulties.” Klein suggests connection with Old English wigle “divination,” and wig, wih “idol.” Watkins says the nouns represent a Proto-Germanic *wikkjaz “necromancer” (one who wakes the dead), from PIE *weg-yo-, from *weg- (2) “to be strong, be lively” (see wake v.).


free will n.
Forms: see free adj., n., and adv. and will n.1
Frequency (in current use):
Etymology: Formed within English, by compounding; modelled on a Latin lexical item.
Etymons: free adj., will n.1
< free adj. + will n.1, partly after classical Latin līberum arbitrium, lībera voluntās, especially in post-classical Latin senses. With sense 1 compare also Anglo-Norman and Old French fraunche volunte (1296 onwards as a legal formula in British sources); with sense 2 compare Old French, Middle French, French franc arbitre (1265; now archaic), Middle French, French libre volonté (1561), French libre arbitre (1649).
Classical Latin līberum arbitrium meant ‘full power to decide, discretionary power, legal freedom of action’; classical Latin voluntās lībera (in Lucretius 2. 256-7 and Cicero De Fato 20) had a sense closer to ‘free ability to choose’. In the writings of St Augustine, in which the concept of the will is developed more fully than it had been in antiquity, liberum arbitrium ‘free decision’ and libera voluntas ‘a free will’ are distinguished. The subsequent history of both terms is complicated, but it can be said that libera voluntas is much more usual than liberum arbitrium in legal documents, often in formulae such as mera et libera voluntate ‘by pure, unconstrained choice’ (12th cent. or earlier, and from 13th cent. in British sources), and that liberum arbitrium is somewhat more usual than libera voluntas in theology.


fabrication n.
2. In bad sense: The action of fabricating or ‘making up’; the invention (of a statement); the forging (of a document). Also concr. An invention; a false statement; a forgery.


suggest v.
1. make a proposal, declare a plan for something the senator proposed to abolish the sales tax
2. drop a hint; intimate by a hint They suggest that there was a traffic accident
3. imply as a possibility The evidence suggests a need for more clarification
4. suggest the necessity of an intervention; in medicine Tetracycline is indicated in such cases
5. call to mind this remark evoked sadness
suus (Sui)
Pronoun
suus m ‎(feminine sua, neuter suum); first/second declension
(possessive, reflexive) his, her/hers, its, their
sug
assimilated form of sub– before -g-.
sub
word-forming element meaning “under, beneath; behind; from under; resulting from further division,” from Latin preposition sub “under, below, beneath, at the foot of,” also “close to, up to, towards;” of time, “within, during;” figuratively “subject to, in the power of;” also “a little, somewhat” (as in sub-horridus “somewhat rough”).
This is said to be from PIE *(s)up- (perhaps representing *ex-upo-), a variant form of the root *upo- “from below,” hence “turning upward, upward, up, up from under, over, beyond” (cognates: Sanskrit upa “near, under, up to, on,” Greek hypo “under,” Gothic iup, Old Norse, Old English upp “up, upward,” Hittite up-zi “rises”). The Latin word also was used as a prefix and in various combinations
gest n.
“famous deed, exploit,” more commonly “story of great deeds, tale of adventure,” c. 1300, from Old French geste, jeste “action, exploit, romance, history” (of celebrated people or actions), from Medieval Latin gesta “actions, exploits, deeds, achievements,” noun use of neuter plural of Latin gestus, past participle of gerere “to carry on, wage, perform,” of unknown origin. Jest n. is the same word.
jest v.
1520s, “to speak in a trifling manner;” 1550s, “to joke,” from Middle English gesten “recite a tale” (late 14c.), from geste (see jest n.). Related: Jested; jesting.


hypothetical adj.
1. based primarily on surmise rather than adequate evidence
theories about the extinction of dinosaurs are still highly conjectural; the supposed reason for his absence; suppositious reconstructions of dead languages; hypothetical situation
hypothetical ~ noun very rare
1. a hypothetical possibility, circumstance, statement, proposal, situation, etc.
consider the following, just as a hypothetical
hypo
word-forming element meaning “under, beneath; less, less than” (in chemistry, indicating a lesser oxidation), from Greek hypo (prep. and adverb) “under, beneath; up from under; toward and under (i.e. into),” from PIE *upo “under; up from under; over” (see sub-).
pathetic adj.n
1. deserving or inciting pity
a hapless victim; miserable victims of war; the shabby room struck her as extraordinarily pathetic- Galsworthy; piteous appeals for help; pitiable homeless children; a pitiful fate; Oh, you poor thing; his poor distorted limbs; a wretched life
2. inspiring mixed contempt and pity
their efforts were pathetic; pitiable lack of character; pitiful exhibition of cowardice
3. inspiring scornful pity
how silly an ardent and unsuccessful wooer can be especially if he is getting on in years- Dashiell Hammett


the theory of money and credit BY L U D W I G VON MISES .pdf
In law, the objective exchange-value of money is stable. It is
sometimes asserted that legal systems adopt the. fiction of the stability of the exchange-value of money; but this is not true. In setting up a fiction, the law requires us to take an actual situation and imagine it to be different from what it really is, either by thinking of non-existent elements as added to it or by thinking of existing elements as removed from it, so as to permit the application of legal maxims which refer only to the situation as thus transformed…
The legislator and the judge always remain aware that the fictitious situation does not correspond to reality.

2014 show 154 june 11

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Tonight’s topic among others: Clint Returns from his holiday and Surname chat and divine right of Kings and all that Is rael,

1 Samuel 8 Wycliffe Bible (WYC)

1 And it was done, when Samuel waxed eld (Grew Old), he set his sons to be judges of Israel.

And the name of his first begotten son was Joel, and the name of the second was Abiah, that were judges in Beersheba;

And his sons went not in his ways, but they bowed after avarice, and they took gifts, and perverted doom

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1+samuel+8&version=WYC

doom (n.) Old English dom “law, judgment, condemnation,” from Proto-Germanic *domaz (cognates: Old Saxon and Old Frisian dom, Old Norse domr, Old High German tuom, Gothic doms “judgment, decree”), from PIE root *dhe- “to set, place, put, do” (cognates: Sanskrit dhaman- “law,” Greek themis “law,” Lithuanian dome “attention;” see factitious). A book of laws in Old English was a dombec. Modern sense of “fate, ruin, destruction” is c. 1600, from the finality of the Christian Judgment Day.

2014 show 124 april 18

pecial Friday Show with Daniel.. how Clint was wrong about the Bible and the answers therein and misery loves company

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Tonight’s topic among others: Special Friday Show with Daniel.. How to become Free, how Clint was wrong about the Bible and the answers therein and misery loves company and;


misery n. late 14c., “condition of external unhappiness,” from Old French misere “miserable situation, misfortune, distress” (12c.), from Latin miseria “wretchedness,” from miser (see miser). Meaning “condition of one in great sorrow or mental distress” is from 1530s. Meaning “bodily pain” is 1825, American English.

goya_satan
Saturn Devouring his Son. 1820-1823. Goya, Francisco. Oil on canvas | 1460 x 830 mm

cult n. 1610s, “worship,” also “a particular form of worship,” from French culte (17c.), from Latin cultus “care, labor; cultivation, culture; worship, reverence,” originally “tended, cultivated,” past participle of colere “to till” (see colony). Rare after 17c.; revived mid-19c. with reference to ancient or primitive rituals. Meaning “a devotion to a person or thing” is from 1829.

Cult. An organized group of people, religious or not, with whom you disagree. [Rawson]

2014 show 117 april 09

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Tonight’s topic among others: Sprayed sky’s and;


Colossians 2 Wyc
13 And when ye were dead in your guilts, and in the prepuce of your flesh, he quickened together you with him; forgiving to you all guilts,
14 doing away that writing of decree that was against us, that was contrary to us; and he took away that from the middle, pitching it on the cross;
15 and he spoiled principats and powers, and led out trustily, openly overcoming them in himself.

Colossians 2 Kjv
13 And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses;
14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;
15 And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it.


transgress v.
late 15c., from Middle French transgresser (14c.), from Latin transgressus, past participle of transgredi “to step across, step over” (see transgression). Related: Transgressed; transgressing.


sin v.
Old English syngian “to commit sin, transgress, err,” from synn (see sin (n.)); the form influenced by the noun. Compare Old Saxon sundion, Old Frisian sendigia, Middle Dutch sondighen, Dutch zondigen, Old High German sunteon, German sündigen “to sin.” Form altered from Middle English sunigen by influence of the noun.

sin n.
Old English synn “moral wrongdoing, injury, mischief, enmity, feud, guilt, crime, offense against God, misdeed,” from Proto-Germanic *sun(d)jo- “sin” (cognates: Old Saxon sundia, Old Frisian sende, Middle Dutch sonde, Dutch zonde, German Sünde “sin, transgression, trespass, offense,” extended forms), probably ultimately “it is true,” i.e. “the sin is real” (compare Gothic sonjis, Old Norse sannr “true”), from PIE *snt-ya-, a collective form from *es-ont- “becoming,” present participle of root *es- “to be” (see is)…


corporation n.
mid-15c., “persons united in a body for some purpose,” from such use in Anglo-Latin, from Late Latin corporationem (nominative corporatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin corporare “to embody” (see corporate). Meaning “legally authorized entity” (including municipal governments and modern business companies) is from 1610s.