2015 show 300 jan 28

Whats the problem? Whats the solution? Your gold and silver is cankered; and the rust of them shall be a witness against you, and shall eat your flesh as it were fire

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Tonight’s topic among others: My Apologies, this post is only the 2nd Hour with Daniel. Republic Broadcasting has no show in the Archives, and Alternative Sources haven’t caught up to the Time Change yet. If you can direct me to a copy of Hour 1 I’d really appreciate it, and;

Clint and Daniel discuss Recognizing and Leaving the Fraud!


fraud n.
mid-14c., “criminal deception” (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin); from Old French fraude “deception, fraud” (13c.), from Latin fraudem (nominative fraus) “a cheating, deceit,” of persons “a cheater, deceiver.” Not in Watkins; perhaps ultimately from PIE *dhreugh- “to deceive” (cognates: Sanskrit dhruti- “deception; error”). Meaning “a fraudulent production, something intended to deceive” is from 1650s. The meaning “impostor, deceiver, pretender; humbug” is attested from 1850. Pious fraud (1560s) is properly “deception practiced for the sake of what is deemed a good purpose;” colloquially used as “person who talks piously but is not pious at heart.”

fraus est celare fraudem. It is fraud to conceal a fraud. Anno: 50 ALR 807.
fraus legis. Fraud of the law; fraud upon the law.


fictio. A fiction.
fiction. In the sense of a fiction of law, a contrived condition or situation; the simulation of a status or condition with the purposeof accomplishing justice, albeit justice reached by devious means, as the fiction of casual ejector whereby the action of ejectment was converted into an action for the determination of title to real estate. 25 Am J2d Eject § 2.
As a literary work, a novel, a portrayal with imaginary characters. In pleading a false averment on the part of the plaintiff which the defendant is not allowed to traverse, the object being to give the court jurisdiction. Snider v Newell, 132 NC 614, 625, 44 SE 354.
fictione juris. Fiction of law. See fiction.
fiction of law. See fiction.
fictitious. Imaginary; not real; counterfeit; false; not genuine. State v Tinnin, 64 Utah 587, 232 P 543, 43 ALR 46, 48.


solution n.
late 14c., “a solving or being solved,” from Old French solucion “division, dissolving; explanation; payment” or directly from Latin solutionem (nominative solutio) “a loosening or unfastening,” noun of action from past participle stem of solvere “to loosen, untie, solve, dissolve” (see solve). Meaning “liquid containing a dissolved substance” is first recorded 1590s.


execution n. v.
The carrying out of some act or course of conduct to its completion. In Criminal Law, the carrying out of a death sentence.


James 5 Kjv
1 Go to now, ye rich men, weep and howl for your miseries that shall come upon you.
2 Your riches are corrupted, and your garments are motheaten.
3 Your gold and silver is cankered; and the rust of them shall be a witness against you, and shall eat your flesh as it were fire. Ye have heaped treasure together for the last days.
4 Behold, the hire of the labourers who have reaped down your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth: and the cries of them which have reaped are entered into the ears of the Lord of sabaoth.
5 Ye have lived in pleasure on the earth, and been wanton; ye have nourished your hearts, as in a day of slaughter.
6 Ye have condemned and killed the just; and he doth not resist you.

2014 show 206 sep 03

The fact in law is that there is no provision in any law to transfer (convey) the given name to any artificial dead legal person, corporation or trust.

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Tonight’s topic among others: More on the History of the Birth Certificate and Daniel’s Adventures in Legal Land! and
noticeonline.info/christianremedyinlaw/ Wayback


bond v.
1670s (transitive), from bond n.. Intransitive sense from 1836. Originally of things; of persons by 1969. Related: Bonded; bonding. Male bonding attested by 1969.
bond n.
early 13c., “anything that binds,” phonetic variant of band (n.1). For vowel change, see long (adj.); also influenced by Old English bonda “householder,” literally “dweller” (see bondage). Legalistic sense first recorded 1590s.
bonded adj.
“legally confirmed by bond,” 1590s, from bond (v.).


certificate n.
early 15c., “action of certifying,” from French certificat, from Medieval Latin certificatum “thing certified,” noun use of neuter past participle of certificare (see certify). Of documents, from mid-15c., especially a document which attests to someone’s authorization to practice or do something (1540s).


scrip n.
“certificate of a right to receive something” (especially a stock share), 1762, probably shortened from (sub)scrip(tion) receipt. Originally “receipt for a portion of a loan subscribed,” meaning “certificate issued as currency” first recorded 1790.


issue v.
c. 1300, “to flow out,” from issue (n.) or else from Old French issu, past participle of issir. Sense of “to send out authoritatively” is from c. 1600; that of “to supply (someone with something)” is from 1925. Related: Issued; issuing.

2014 show 93 march 05

Foundation documentation talk #birthcertificate

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Tonight’s topic among others: Foundation documentation talk birthcertificate


born
Old English boren, alternative past participle of beran (see bear (v.)). Distinction between born and borne is 17c.
suborn v.
“to procure unlawfully, to bribe to accomplish a wicked purpose, especially to induce a witness to perjury, “to lure (someone) to commit a crime,” 1530s, from Middle French suborner “seduce, instigate, bribe” (13c.) and directly from Latin subornare “employ as a secret agent, incite secretly,” originally “equip, fit out, furnish,” from sub “under, secretly” (see sub-) + ornare “equip,” related to ordo “order” (see order (n.)). Related: Suborned; suborning.


informer n.
late 14c., enfourmer “instructor, one who teaches or gives advice,” from inform (Middle English enfourmen) and also from Old French enformeor. Meaning “one who communicates information” is mid-15c.; sense of “one who gives information against another” (especially in reference to law-breaking) is c. 1500.
informant n.
1690s, “someone who supplies information,” from Latin informantem (nominative informans), present participle of informare “train, instruct, educate” (see inform). Occasionally as “one who gives information to the authorities, one who dishonorably betrays knowledge gained in confidence” (1783). Informer is older in both senses and more usual in the latter. As an adjective from 1890.