2014 show 108 march 26

Native inhabitants and talk about the surname

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Tonight’s topic among others: Clint is ill, Native inhabitants and talk about the surname and;


childhood n.
Old English cild “fetus, infant, unborn or newly born person,” from Proto-Germanic *kiltham (cognates: Gothic kilþei “womb,” inkilþo “pregnant;” Danish kuld “children of the same marriage;” Old Swedish kulder “litter;” Old English cildhama “womb,” lit. “child-home”); no certain cognates outside Germanic. “App[arently] originally always used in relation to the mother as the ‘fruit of the womb'” [Buck]. Also in late Old English, “a youth of gentle birth” (archaic, usually written childe). In 16c.-17c. especially “girl child.”

The wider sense “young person before the onset of puberty” developed in late Old English. Phrase with child “pregnant” (late 12c.) retains the original sense. The sense extension from “infant” to “child” also is found in French enfant, Latin infans. Meaning “one’s own child; offspring of parents” is from late 12c. (the Old English word was bearn; see bairn). Figurative use from late 14c. Most Indo-European languages use the same word for “a child” and “one’s child,” though there are exceptions (such as Latin liberi/pueri).

The difficulty with the plural began in Old English, where the nominative plural was at first cild, identical with the singular, then c.975 a plural form cildru (genitive cildra) arose, probably for clarity’s sake, only to be re-pluraled late 12c. as children, which is thus a double plural. Middle English plural cildre survives in Lancashire dialect childer and in Childermas.

An infant n.
Forms: Also ME fant, fawnt.
Etymology: Aphetic form of Old French enfaunt, enfant:

faunt n.
1382 Bible (Wycliffite, E.V.) Lev. xii. 3 The eiȝt day the fawnt shal be circumcidid Odj.

C. The lnitlial letter or the word’ Codex.’
used by Bome ‘Writers in ciling the Code of justinian. Tay!. Civil Law, 24.
It was also the letter inscribed on the bal­lots by which, among the Romans, jurors
voted to condemn an accused party.
It was the initial letter of condemno, I condemn.
Tay!. Civil Law. 192

hild v. Obs. Trans.
a. To flay, skin.
b. To strip off (the skin).

chi n.
22nd letter of the Greek alphabet, representing a –kh– sound (see ch). The letter is shaped like an X, and so the Greek letter name was used figuratively to signify such a shape or arrangement (as in khiasma “two things placed crosswise;” khiastos “arranged diagonally; marked with an X;” khiazein “to mark with an ‘X’, to write the letter ‘X'”). Some dialects used chi to represent the -ks- sound properly belonging to xi; Latin picked this up and the sound value of chi in Latin-derived alphabets is now that of English X.
chiasma n.
“a crossing,” 1832, medical Latin, from Greek khiasma “two things placed crosswise,” which is related to khiasmos (see chiasmus). In cytology from 1911.
chiasmus n.
in grammar, inversion of word order, 1871, Latinized from Greek khiasmos “a placing crosswise, diagonal arrangement” (see chi).

Adam, first of men,
To first of women, Eve
.
[“Paradise Lost”]

X
The entire entry for X in Johnson’s dictionary (1756) is: “X is a letter, which, though found in Saxon words, begins no word in the English language.” Most English words beginning in -x- are of Greek origin or modern commercial coinages. East Anglian in 14c. showed a tendency to use -x- for initial sh-, sch- (such as xal for shall), which didn’t catch on but seems an improvement over the current system. As a symbol of a kiss on a letter, etc., it is recorded from 1765. In malt liquor, XX denoted “double quality” and XXX “strongest quality” (1827).

Algebraic meaning “unknown quantity” (1660 in English, from French), sometimes is said to be from medieval use, originally a crossed -r-, in that case probably from Latin radix (see root n.). Other theories trace it to Arabic (Klein), but a more prosaic explanation says Descartes (1637) took x, y, z, the last three letters of the alphabet, for unknowns to correspond to a, b, c, used for known quantities.

Used allusively for “unknown person” from 1797, “something unknown” since 1859. As a type of chromosome, attested from 1902 (first so called in German; Henking, 1891). To designate “films deemed suitable for adults only,” first used 1950 in Britain; adopted in U.S. Nov. 1, 1968. The XYZ Affair in American history (1797) involved French agents designated by those letters.

ild An obsolete dialectal form of yield. It occurs in the phrase God ild, for God yield. See under God.

yield n.
Old English gield “payment, sum of money; service, offering, worship;” from the source of yield v.. Extended sense of “production” (as of crops) is first attested mid-15c. Earliest English sense survives in financial “yield from investments.”

hood
word-forming element meaning “state or condition of being,” from Old English -had “condition, quality, position” (as in cildhad “childhood,” preosthad “priesthood,” werhad “manhood”), cognate with German -heit/-keit, Dutch -heid, Old Frisian and Old Saxon -hed, all from Proto-Germanic *haidus “manner, quality,” literally “bright appearance,” from PIE (s)kai- (1) “bright, shining” (Cognates: Sanskrit ketu “brightness, appearance”). Originally a free-standing word (see hade); in Modern English it survives only in this suffix


circumcised adj.
a. Having the prepuce cut off; that has undergone circumcision. (Allusively used for ‘Jewish’ or ‘Muslim’.)
b. fig. Spiritually chastened or purified.
2. Cut or shorn round. Obs.
3. Cut short, curtailed, circumscribed Obs.

circumcise n.
mid-13c., “to cut off the foreskin,” from Old French circoncisier “circumcise” (12c., Modern French circoncire), from Latin circumcisus, past participle of circumcidere “to cut round, to cut trim, to cut off” (see circumcision). Related: Circumcised; circumcising.

skin v.
late 14c., “to remove the skin from” (originally of circumcision), from skin (n.). As “to have (a particular kind of) skin” from c. 1400. In 19c. U.S. colloquial use, “to strip, fleece, plunder;” hence skin-game, one in which one player has no chance against the others (as with a stacked deck), the type of con game played in a skin-house. Skin the cat in gymnastics is from 1845. Related: Skinned; skinning.

fleece v.
1530s in the literal sense of “to strip (a sheep) of fleece,” from fleece (n.). From 1570s in the figurative meaning “to cheat, swindle, strip of money.” Related: Fleeced; fleecer; fleecing.

Genesis 3 Kjv
21 Unto Adam also and to his wife did the Lord God make coats of skins, and clothed them.


surname n.
c. 1300, “name, title, or epithet added to a person’s name,” from sur “above” (from Latin super-; see sur- (1)) + name (n.); modeled on Anglo-French surnoun “surname” (early 14c.), variant of Old French sornom, from sur “over” + nom “name.” As “family name” from late 14c.

An Old English word for this was freonama, literally “free name.” Meaning “family name” is first found late 14c. Hereditary surnames existed among Norman nobility in England in early 12c., among the common people they began to be used 13c., increasingly frequent until near universal by end of 14c. The process was later in the north of England than the south. The verb is attested from 1510s. Related: Surnamed.
surprefix.
word-forming element meaning “over, above, beyond, in addition,” especially in words from Anglo-French and Old French, from Old French sour-, sor-, sur-, from Latin super (see super-).


https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/christ-and-the-canaanite-woman.jpg?w=840


gentile n.
“one who is not a Jew,” c. 1400; earlier “one who is not a Christian, a pagan” (late 14c.), from Late Latin noun use of Latin gentilis “of the same family or clan, of or belonging to a Roman gens,” from gens (genitive gentis) “race, clan” (see genus, and compare gentle).

The Latin adjective also meant “of or belonging to the same nation,” hence, as a noun, gentiles (plural) might mean “men of family; persons belonging to the same family; fellow countrymen, kinsmen,” but also “foreigners, barbarians” (as opposed to Romans), those bound only by the Jus Gentium, the “law of nations,” defined as “the law that natural reason establishes among all mankind and is followed by all peoples alike.”

The Latin word then was used in the Vulgate to translate Greek ethnikos (see ethnic), from ta ethne “the nations,” which translated Hebrew ha goyim “the (non-Jewish) nations” (see goy). Hence in Late Latin, after the Christianization of Rome, gentilis also could mean “pagans, heathens,” as opposed to Christians. Based on Scripture, gentile also was used by Mormons (1847) and Shakers (1857) to refer to those not of their profession.
goy n.
“a gentile, a non-Jew” (plural goyim), 1835, from Hebrew goy “people, nation;” in Mishnaic and Modern Hebrew, also “gentile” (compare gentile). The fem. form of the Hebrew word entered Middle French as gouge “a wench” (15c.).


pledge v.
c. 1400, “to promise” (something to someone), “to give over as security for repayment,” also “promise faith to,” from pledge (n.) and from Old French plegier, from plege (n.). From mid-15c. as “to stand surety for, be responsible for;” late 15c. as “to mortgage.” Meaning “put (someone) under oath” is from 1570s; sense of “to solemnly promise or guarantee” is from 1590s, as is sense “to drink a toast.” Related: Pledged; pledging.
pledge n.
mid-14c., “surety, bail,” from Old French plege (Modern French pleige) “hostage, security, bail,” probably from Frankish *plegan “to guarantee,” from *pleg-, a West Germanic root meaning “have responsibility for” (cognates: Old Saxon plegan “vouch for,” Middle Dutch plien “to answer for, guarantee,” Old High German pflegan “to care for, be accustomed to,” Old English pleon “to risk the loss of, expose to danger;” see plight (v.)).

Meaning “allegiance vow attested by drinking with another” is from 1630s. Sense of “solemn promise” first recorded 1814, though this notion is from 16c. in the verb. Weekley notes the “curious contradiction” in pledge (v.) “to toast with a drink” (1540s) and pledge (n.) “the vow to abstain from drinking” (1833). Meaning “student who has agreed to join a fraternity or sorority” dates from 1901.