2014 show 117 april 09

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Tonight’s topic among others: Sprayed sky’s and;


Colossians 2 Wyc
13 And when ye were dead in your guilts, and in the prepuce of your flesh, he quickened together you with him; forgiving to you all guilts,
14 doing away that writing of decree that was against us, that was contrary to us; and he took away that from the middle, pitching it on the cross;
15 and he spoiled principats and powers, and led out trustily, openly overcoming them in himself.

Colossians 2 Kjv
13 And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses;
14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;
15 And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it.


transgress v.
late 15c., from Middle French transgresser (14c.), from Latin transgressus, past participle of transgredi “to step across, step over” (see transgression). Related: Transgressed; transgressing.


sin v.
Old English syngian “to commit sin, transgress, err,” from synn (see sin (n.)); the form influenced by the noun. Compare Old Saxon sundion, Old Frisian sendigia, Middle Dutch sondighen, Dutch zondigen, Old High German sunteon, German sündigen “to sin.” Form altered from Middle English sunigen by influence of the noun.

sin n.
Old English synn “moral wrongdoing, injury, mischief, enmity, feud, guilt, crime, offense against God, misdeed,” from Proto-Germanic *sun(d)jo- “sin” (cognates: Old Saxon sundia, Old Frisian sende, Middle Dutch sonde, Dutch zonde, German Sünde “sin, transgression, trespass, offense,” extended forms), probably ultimately “it is true,” i.e. “the sin is real” (compare Gothic sonjis, Old Norse sannr “true”), from PIE *snt-ya-, a collective form from *es-ont- “becoming,” present participle of root *es- “to be” (see is)…


corporation n.
mid-15c., “persons united in a body for some purpose,” from such use in Anglo-Latin, from Late Latin corporationem (nominative corporatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin corporare “to embody” (see corporate). Meaning “legally authorized entity” (including municipal governments and modern business companies) is from 1610s.

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