2014 show 215 sept 17

The Borg are a collection of species that have been turned into cybernetic organisms functioning as drones in a hive mind called “The Collective”.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Were gonna get into some serious bible study today and tackle the Book of Proverbs and

“The Book of Proverbs is about godly wisdom, how to get it and how to use it. It’s about priorities and principles, not get-rich-quick schemes or success formulas. It tells you, not how to make a living, but how to be skillful in the lost art of making a life.” Warren W. Wiersbe, Be Skillful, p. 7.
Notes on Proverbs 2015 Edition The proverbs of Solomon the son of David, king of Israel; To know wisdom and instruction; to perceive the words of understanding; To receive the instruction of wisdom, justice, and judgment, and equity; …


proverb (n.) c. 1300, in boke of Prouerbyys, the Old Testament work, from Old French proverbe (12c.) and directly from Latin proverbium “a common saying, old adage, maxim,” literally “words put forward,” from pro- “forth” (see pro-) + verbum “word” (see verb). Used generally from late 14c. The Book of Proverbs in Old English was cwidboc, from cwide “speech, saying, proverb, homily,” related to cwiddian “to talk, speak, say, discuss;” cwiddung “speech, saying, report.”
word-forming element meaning “forward, forth, toward the front” (as in proclaim, proceed); “beforehand, in advance” (prohibit, provide); “taking care of” (procure); “in place of, on behalf of” (proconsul, pronoun); from Latin pro “on behalf of, in place of, before, for, in exchange for, just as,” which also was used as a prefix.

Also in some cases from cognate Greek pro “before, in front of, sooner,” which also was used in Greek as a prefix (as in pr o blem). Both the Latin and Greek words are from PIE *pro- (cognates: Sanskrit pra- “before, forward, forth;” Gothic faura “before,” Old English fore “before, for, on account of,” fram “forward, from;” Old Irish roar “enough”), extended form of root *per- (1) “forward, through” (see per).

The common modern sense “in favor of, favoring” (pro-independence, pro-fluoridation, pro-Soviet, etc.) was not in classical Latin and is attested in English from early 19c.

verb (n.) late 14c., from Old French verbe “word; word of God; saying; part of speech that expresses action or being” (12c.) and directly from Latin verbum “verb,” originally “a word,” from PIE root *were- (3) “to speak” (cognates: Avestan urvata- “command;” Sanskrit vrata- “command, vow;” Greek rhetor “public speaker,” rhetra “agreement, covenant,” eirein “to speak, say;” Hittite weriga- “call, summon;” Lithuanian vardas “name;” Gothic waurd, Old English word “word”).


BORG : In Saxon law. A pledge, pledge giver, or surety. The name given among the Saxons to the head of each family composing a tithing or decen­nary, each being the pledge for the good conduct of the others. Also the contract or engagement of suretyship ; and the pledge given.
BORGBRICHE :
A breach or violation of surety­ ship, or of mutual fidelity. Jacob.
BORGESMON :
In Saxon law. The name given to the head of each family composing a tithing.

Blacks law fourth edition : B

borg : Same as borgh.
borgh. 1. See BORG. 2. See BORROW. (Blacks 9th)
borrow, n. A frankpledge. Also spelled borgh; borh.
See DECENARY; FRANKPLEDGE

decenary. [fro Latin decena “a tithing”] Hist. A town
or district consisting of ten freeholding families. – A freeholder of the decenary (a decennarius) was bound by frankpledge to produce any wrongdoer living in the decenary. – Also spelled (incorrectly) decennary. ­
Also termed decmna; tithing. Cf. FRANKPLEDGE.
“The civil division of the territory of England is into counties, of those counties into hundreds, of those hundreds into tithings or towns. Which division, as it now stands, seems to owe its original to king Alfred; who, to prevent the rapines (plunder) and disorders which formerly prevailed in the realm, instituted tithings; so called from the Saxon, because ten freeholders, with their families, composed one.
These all dwelt together, and were sureties or free pledges to the king for the good behavior of each other; and, if any offence was committed in their district, they were bound to have the offender forthcoming. And there­ fore anciently no man was suffered to abide in England above forty days, unless he were enrolled in some tithing or decennary.” 1 William Blackstone, Commentaries on the
Laws of England 110 (1765).


Are we Prisoners of War?

Conflicts not of an international character
Geneva, 12 August 1949 Conventions and Additional Protocols, and their Commentaries

In the case of armed conflict not of an international character occurring in the territory of one of the High Contracting Parties, each Party to the conflict shall be bound to apply, as a minimum, the following provisions:
(1) Persons taking no active part in the hostilities, including members of armed forces who have laid down their arms and those placed ‘ hors de combat ‘ (outside the fight) by sickness, wounds, detention, or any other cause, shall in all circumstances be treated humanely, without any adverse distinction founded on race, colour, religion or faith, sex, birth or wealth, or any other similar criteria.
To this end, the following acts are and shall remain prohibited at any time and in any place whatsoever with respect to the above-mentioned persons:

demobilize ~ verb rare
1. release from military service or remove from the active list of military service
2. retire from military service


Superfluity
SUPERFLU’ITY, noun [Latin superfluitas; super and fluo, to flow.]
1. Superabundance; a greater quantity than is wanted; as a superfluity of water or provisions.

  1. Something that is beyond what is wanted; something rendered unnecessary by its abundance. Among the superfluities of life we seldom number the abundance of money.

money (n.) mid-13c., “coinage, metal currency,” from Old French monoie “money, coin, currency; change” (Modern French monnaie), from Latin moneta “place for coining money, mint; coined money, money, coinage,” from Moneta, a title or surname of the Roman goddess Juno, in or near whose temple money was coined; perhaps from monere “advise, warn” (see monitor (n.)), with the sense of “admonishing goddess,” which is sensible, but the etymology is difficult. Extended early 19c. to include paper money.

The Juno awards
As Juno Moneta (“the Warner”), she had a temple on the Arx (the northern summit of the Capitoline Hill) from 344 bc; it later housed the Roman mint, and the words “mint” and “money” derive from the name.

  1. Military. the code name for a beach on France’s Normandy coast, attacked by Canadian forces as part of the Allies’ D-day invasion on June 6, 1944. – Juno Beach is the second of the three invasion sectors of the Commonwealth forces. Here land the Canadians

Temple of Juno Moneta


Other historical references to the term Juno MONETA

A time of Richard I. Stim. Law Gloss. http://thelawdictionary.org/moneta

Henry II, King of England: The Saladin Tithe, 1188


Mammon (n.)**
“personification of wealth,” mid-14c., from Late Latin mammona, from Greek mamonas, from Aramaic mamona, mamon “riches, gain;” left untranslated in Greek New Testament (e.g. Matt. vi:24, Luke xvi:9-13) retained in the Vulgate, and regarded mistakenly by medieval Christians as the name of a demon.

2014 show 187 july 30

Surety is “My” Name I stand under “The Law of the Land” The Law of the Corporation, in the land of the dead

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Tonight’s topic among others: Surety (as in Surname), “The Law of the Land” .. The Law of the Corporation of the United States .. Supersedes any State Law! Some Definitions:  Tort, Indebtedness, Attorney General, Public, Debtor Names

debtor (n.) early 13c., dettur, dettour, from Old French detour, from Latin debitor “a debter,” from past participle stem of debere; see debt. The -b- was restored in later French, and in English c. 1560-c. 1660. The KJV has detter three times, debter three times, debtor twice and debtour once.

tort (n.) mid-13c., “injury, wrong,” from Old French tort “wrong, injustice, crime” (11c.), from Medieval Latin tortum “injustice,” noun use of neuter of tortus “wrung, twisted,” past participle of Latin torquere “turn, turn awry, twist, wring, distort” (see torque (n.)). Legal sense of “breach of a duty, whereby someone acquires a right of action for damages” is first recorded 1580s.

http://webstersdictionary1828.com/Dictionary/Land

2014 show 146 may 20

Having a Baby? Give your hilding the Mark of the Beast, it’s the gift that keeps on giving.. Did I say giving? I meant taking.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Having a Baby? Here’s a Roundtable on how to keep your child from inheriting the Mark of the Beast. You have a Choice! A Free Child, or a Corporate Citizen with a phony name, with loads of Debt! Clint’s Guests Tonight: Freeman Burt, http://www.onlyfreemen.com/ and; pleading the baby act is a slang term used to refer to the act of asserting a person’s infancy as a defense to a contract claim. This plea of infancy is raised to defeat an action upon a contract made when the person was a minor. It is also at times applied to a plea of the statute of Limitations.


debt n. late 13c., dette, from Old French dete, from Latin debitum “thing owed,” neuter past participle of debere “to owe,” originally, “keep something away from someone,” from de- “away” (see de-) + habere “to have” (see habit (n.)). Restored spelling after c. 1400. In Middle English, debt of the body (mid-14c.) was “that which spouses owe to each other, sexual intercourse.”debtor (n.) early 13c., dettur, dettour, from Old French detour, from Latin debitor “a debter,” from past participle stem of debere; see debt. The -b- was restored in later French, and in English c. 1560-c. 1660. The KJV has detter three times, debter three times, debtor twice and debtour once.

fraud n. mid-14c., “criminal deception” (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin); from Old French fraude “deception, fraud” (13c.), from Latin fraudem (nominative fraus) “a cheating, deceit,” of persons “a cheater, deceiver.” Not in Watkins; perhaps ultimately from PIE *dhreugh- “to deceive” (cognates: Sanskrit dhruti- “deception; error”). Meaning “a fraudulent production, something intended to deceive” is from 1650s. The meaning “impostor, deceiver, pretender; humbug” is attested from 1850. Pious fraud (1560s) is properly “deception practiced for the sake of what is deemed a good purpose;” colloquially used as “person who talks piously but is not pious at heart.”

2014 show 112 april 02

Forgive to us our debts, as we forgive to our debtors and the Super Sonic Fraudsters for the Pagan Universal Church

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Tonight’s topic among others: Matthew 6 and the Super Sonic Fraudsters for the Pope and;


Matthew 6 Wyc
9 And thus ye shall pray, Our Father that art in heavens, hallowed be thy name;
10 thy kingdom come to; be thy will done in earth as it is in heaven;
11 give to us this day our each day’s bread;
2 and forgive to us our debts, as we forgive to our debtors;
13 and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.
24 No man may serve two lords, for either he shall hate the one, and love the other; either he shall sustain the one [or he shall sustain the one], and despise the other. Ye be not able to serve God and riches.


Jean Baudrillard – Simulacra and Simulation .pdf


bill n. ancient weapon, Old English bill “sword (especially one with a hooked blade), chopping tool,” common Germanic (compare Old Saxon bil “sword,” Middle Dutch bile, Dutch bijl, Old High German bihal, German Beil, Old Norse bilda “hatchet.”…
bill n.written statement,” mid-14c., from Anglo-French bille, Anglo-Latin billa “list,” from Medieval Latin bulla “decree, seal, sealed document,” in classical Latin “bubble, boss, stud, amulet for the neck” (hence “seal;” see bull (n.2)). Sense of “account, invoice” first recorded c. 1400; that of “order to pay” (technically bill of exchange) is from 1570s; that of “paper money” is from 1660s. Meaning “draft of an act of Parliament” is from 1510s.

be v. Old English beon, beom, bion “be, exist, come to be, become, happen,” from Proto-Germanic *biju- “I am, I will be.” This “b-root” is from PIE root *bheue- “to be, exist, grow, come into being,” and in addition to the words in English it yielded German present first and second person singular (bin, bist, from Old High German bim “I am,” bist “thou art”), Latin perfective tenses of esse (fui “I was,” etc.), Old Church Slavonic byti “be,” Greek phu- “become,” Old Irish bi’u “I am,” Lithuanian bu’ti “to be,” Russian byt’ “to be,” etc. It also is behind Sanskrit bhavah “becoming,” bhavati “becomes, happens,” bhumih “earth, world.”
ill adj. c. 1200, “wickedly; with hostility,” from ill (adj.). Meaning “not well, poorly” is from c. 1300. It generally has not shifted to the realm of physical sickess, as the adjective has done. Ill-fated recorded from 1710; ill-informed from 1824; ill-tempered from c. 1600; ill-starred from c. 1600. Generally contrasted with well, hence the useful, but now obsolete or obscure illcome (1570s), illfare (c. 1300), and illth.
ill adj. c. 1200, “morally evil; offensive, objectionable” (other 13c. senses were “malevolent, hurtful, unfortunate, difficult”), from Old Norse illr “evil, bad; hard, difficult; mean, stingy,” a word of unknown origin. Not considered to be related to evil. From mid-14c. as “marked by evil intentions; harmful, pernicious.” Sense of “sick, unhealthy, diseased, unwell” is first recorded mid-15c., probably from a use similar to that in the Old Norse idiom “it is bad to me.” Slang inverted sense of “very good, cool” is 1980s. As a noun, “something evil,” from mid-13c.
ill v. early 13c., “do evil to,” from ill (adj.). Meaning “speak disparagingly” is from 1520s. Related: Illed; illing.


synonym n. “word having the same sense as another,” early 15c. (but usually in plural form before 18c., or, if singular, as synonyma), from Old French synonyme (12c.) and directly from Late Latin synonymum, from Greek synonymon “word having the same sense as another,” noun use of neuter of synonymos “having the same name as, synonymous,” from syn- “together, same” (see syn-) + onyma, Aeolic dialectal form of onoma “name” (see name n.).


Luke 11:52 Kjv
52 Woe unto you, lawyers! for ye have taken away the key of knowledge: ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in ye hindered.

Luke 11:52 Wyc
52 Woe to you, wise men of the law, for ye have taken away the key of knowing; and ye yourselves entered not, and ye have forbidden them that entered.


James 5 Wyc
1 Do now, ye rich men, weep ye, yelling in your wretchednesses that shall come to you.
2 Your riches be rotten, and your clothes be eaten of moths.
3 Your gold and silver hath rusted, and the rust of them shall be to you into witnessing, and shall eat your fleshes, as fire. Ye have treasured to you wrath in the last days.
4 Lo! the hire of your workmen, that reaped your fields, which is defrauded of you [which is frauded of you], crieth; and the cry of them hath entered into the ears of the Lord of hosts.
5 Ye have eaten on the earth, and in your lecheries ye have nourished your hearts. In the day of slaying


Leviticus 6:4 Wyc
if it is convicted of the guilt, he shall yield whole all things which he would get by fraud, (if he is convicted, and found guilty, he shall give back whole everything which he hath gotten by fraud,)
Joshua 9:22
Joshua called (for the) Gibeonites, and said to them, Why would ye deceive us by fraud, (so) that ye said, We dwell full far from you, since ye be in the midst of us? (We live far away from you, when truly ye live right here in the midst of us?)
Judges 11:9
And Jephthah said to them, Whether ye came verily, or without fraud, to me, that I fight for you against the sons of Ammon, and if the Lord shall betake them into mine hands, shall I be your prince?
Proverbs 24:2
For the soul of them bethinketh (on) ravens, and their lips speak frauds.


impersonation n. 1800, “personification;” 1825 as “an acting of a part or character;” noun of action from impersonate v.


fee n. Middle English, representing the merger or mutual influence of two words, one from Old English, one from an Old French form of the same Germanic word, and both ultimately from a PIE root meaning “cattle.”

The Old English word is feoh “livestock, cattle; movable property; possessions in livestock, goods, or money; riches, treasure, wealth; money as a medium of exchange or payment,” from Proto-Germanic *fehu- (cognates: Old Saxon fehu, Old High German fihu, German Vieh “cattle,” Gothic faihu “money, fortune”). This is from PIE *peku- “cattle” (cognates: Sanskrit pasu, Lithuanian pekus “cattle;” Latin pecu “cattle,” pecunia “money, property”).

The other word is Anglo-French fee, from Old French fieu, a variant of fief “possession, holding, domain; feudal duties, payment” (see fief ), which apparently is a Germanic compound in which the first element is cognate with Old English feoh.

Via Anglo-French come the legal senses “estate in land or tenements held on condition of feudal homage; land, property, possession” (c. 1300). Hence fee-simple (late 14c.) “absolute ownership,” as opposed to fee-tail (early 15c.) “entailed ownership,” inheritance limited to some particular class of heirs (second element from Old French taillir “to cut, to limit”).

The feudal sense was extended from landholdings to inheritable offices of service to a feudal lord (late 14c.; in Anglo-French late 13c.), for example forester of fe “a forester by heritable right.” As these often were offices of profit, the word came to be used for “remuneration for service in office” (late 14c.), hence, “payment for (any kind of) work or services” (late 14c.). From late 14c. as “a sum paid for a privilege” (originally admission to a guild); early 15c. as “money payment or charge exacted for a license, etc.”


Colossians 2
13 And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses;
14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;
15 And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it.