2015 show 295 jan 21

The Shmita! The Jew Bile Epsilon, the moon of blood and a self-fulfilling prophecy

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Tonight’s topic among others: The Shmita! which can predict all financial collapses! and; God is responsible for Shmita’s which are a Seven year cycle! How can Empires Crashing be Predicted and; Shmita is also known as the Release or the Collapse! and; 1929 happened on the day of the Shmita and WWI happened on the Year of the Shmita and WWII happened on the Seven year cycle of the Shmita and 2001, Was the end of Towers, or Shakings.. in the middle of the 49 Year Period or Jubilee and Seven Years later another Jubiliee.. the Financial Crisis of 2008 and; The Jubilee ends in September 2015, is this the Financial Collapse?
Shmita – Wikipedia


self-fulfilling prophecy
Any positive or negative expectation about circumstances, events, or people that may affect a person’s behavior toward them in a manner that causes those expectations to be fulfilled.
becoming real or true by virtue of having been predicted or expected self–fulfilling prophecy


888
In Christian numerology, the number 888 represents Jesus, or sometimes more specifically Christ the Redeemer.
888 (number) – Wikipedia


Revelation 3:9 Kjv
Behold, I will make them of the synagogue of Satan, which say they are Jews, and are not, but do lie; behold, I will make them to come and worship before thy feet, and to know that I have loved thee.


https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/offering_by_lund.jpg


jubilee n.
late 14c., in the Old Testament sense, from Old French jubileu “jubille; anniversary; rejoicing,” from Late Latin iubilaeus “the jubilee year,” originally an adjective, “of the jubilee,” altered (by association with Latin iubilare “to shout with joy”) from Greek iabelaios, from iobelos, from Hebrew yobhel “jubilee,” formerly “a trumpet, ram’s horn,” literally “ram.”

The original notion was of a year of emancipation of slaves and restoration of lands, to be celebrated every 50th year (Levit. xxv:9); it was proclaimed by the sounding of a ram’s horn on the Day of Atonement. The Catholic Church sense of “a period for remission of sin penalties in exchange for pilgrimages, alms, etc.” was begun in 1300 by Boniface VIII. The general sense of “season of rejoicing” is first recorded mid-15c., though through early 20c. the word kept its specific association with 50th anniversaries. As a type of African-American folk song, it is attested from 1872.

Leviticus 25:9 Kjv
Then shalt thou cause the trumpet of the jubile to sound on the tenth day of the seventh month, in the day of atonement shall ye make the trumpet sound throughout all your land.

Jew n. v.
a. A person of Hebrew descent; one whose religion is Judaism; an Israelite.
To cheat or overreach, in the way attributed to Jewish traders or usurers. Also, to drive a hard bargain, and intr., to haggle. Phr. to jew down, to beat down in price; also transf.These uses are now considered to be offensive.
bile n.
1660s, from French bile (17c.) “bile,” also, informally, “anger,” from Latin bilis “fluid secreted by the liver,” also one of the four humors (also known as choler), thus “anger, peevishness” (especially as black bile, 1797).
Epsilon
is the fifth letter of the Greek alphabet, corresponding phonetically to a close-mid front unrounded vowel /e/. In the system of Greek numerals it has the value five. It was derived from the Phoenician letter He
In Judaism
He is often used to represent the name of God, as He stands for Hashem, which means The Name and is a way of saying God without actually saying the name of God.


Joel 2:31 Kjv
The sun shall be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, before the great and terrible day of the Lord come.


https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/blood-moon.jpg?w=840


city n.
early 13c., in medieval usage a cathedral town, but originally “any settlement,” regardless of size (distinction from town is 14c., though in English it always seems to have ranked above borough), from Old French cite “town, city” (10c., Modern French cité), from earlier citet, from Latin civitatem (nominative civitas; in Late Latin sometimes citatem) originally “citizenship, condition or rights of a citizen, membership in the community,” later “community of citizens, state, commonwealth” (used, for instance of the Gaulish tribes), from civis “townsman,” from PIE root *kei- “to lie; bed, couch; homestead; beloved, dear” (see cemetery).

The sense has been transferred from the inhabitants to the place. The Latin word for “city” was urbs, but a resident was civis. Civitas seems to have replaced urbs as Rome (the ultimate urbs) lost its prestige. Loss of Latin -v- is regular in French in some situations (compare alleger from alleviare; neige from nivea; jeune from juvenis. A different sound evolution from the Latin word yielded Italian citta, Catalan ciutat, Spanish ciudad, Portuguese cidade.

Replaced Old English burh (see borough). London is the city from 1550s. As an adjective from c. 1300. City hall first recorded 1670s to fight city hall is 1913, American English; city slicker first recorded 1916 (see slick); both American English. City limits is from 1825. The newspaper city desk attested from 1878. Inner city first attested 1968. City state (also city-state) is attested from 1877.


Leviticus 25 Kjv
23 The land shall not be sold for ever: for the land is mine, for ye are strangers and sojourners with me.
28 But if he be not able to restore it to him, then that which is sold shall remain in the hand of him that hath bought it until the year of jubile: and in the jubile it shall go out, and he shall return unto his possession.


gentile n.
“one who is not a Jew,” c. 1400; earlier “one who is not a Christian, a pagan” (late 14c.), from Late Latin noun use of Latin gentilis “of the same family or clan, of or belonging to a Roman gens,” from gens (genitive gentis) “race, clan” (see genus, and compare gentle).

The Latin adjective also meant “of or belonging to the same nation,” hence, as a noun, gentiles (plural) might mean “men of family; persons belonging to the same family; fellow countrymen, kinsmen,” but also “foreigners, barbarians” (as opposed to Romans), those bound only by the Jus Gentium, the “law of nations,” defined as “the law that natural reason establishes among all mankind and is followed by all peoples alike.”

The Latin word then was used in the Vulgate to translate Greek ethnikos (see ethnic), from ta ethne “the nations,” which translated Hebrew ha goyim “the (non-Jewish) nations” (see goy). Hence in Late Latin, after the Christianization of Rome, gentilis also could mean “pagans, heathens,” as opposed to Christians. Based on Scripture, gentile also was used by Mormons (1847) and Shakers (1857) to refer to those not of their profession.
goy n.
“a gentile, a non-Jew” (plural goyim), 1835, from Hebrew goy “people, nation;” in Mishnaic and Modern Hebrew, also “gentile” (compare gentile). The fem. form of the Hebrew word entered Middle French as gouge “a wench” (15c.).

gentilitious adj.
1. Characteristic of a ‘gentile’; pagan. Obs.—1
2. Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of, a nation; national. (= gentilitial adj. 1.)
a. Of or pertaining to a gens or family. (= gentilitial adj. 2.)


Consideration n.
1. The act of considering; mental view; regard; notice.
2. Mature thought; serious deliberation
5. That which is considered; motive of action; influence; ground of conduct.
6. Reason; that which induces to a determination.
7. In law, the reason which moves a contracting party to enter into an agreement; the material cause of a contract; the price or motive of a stipulation. In all contracts, each party gives something in exchange for what he receives.


human adj. n.human, 17 yuman (nonstandard).
Chiefly fig. Designating a person who takes on the appearance or form, or who performs the function of a specified (esp. inanimate) thing; (also) designating a person who assumes the appearance, role, or abilities of a specified creature.
human adj.
mid-15c., humain, humaigne, “human,” from Old French humain, umain (adj.) “of or belonging to man” (12c.), from Latin humanus “of man, human,” also “humane, philanthropic, kind, gentle, polite; learned, refined, civilized.” This is in part from PIE *(dh)ghomon-, literally “earthling, earthly being,” as opposed to the gods (see homunculus). Compare Hebrew adam “man,” from adamah “ground.” Cognate with Old Lithuanian zmuo (accusative zmuni) “man, male person.”
Human interest is from 1824. Human rights attested by 1680s; human being by 1690s. Human relations is from 1916; human resources attested by 1907, American English, apparently originally among social Christians and based on natural resources.
homunculus n.
“tiny human being produced artificially,” 1650s, from Latin homunculus (plural homunculi), literally “little person,” with -culus, diminutive suffix, + homo (genitive hominis), which technically meant “male human,” but it also was used with a sense “the human race, mankind;” while in Vulgar Latin it could be used as “one, anyone, they, people” and in logical and scholastic writing as “a human being, person.” This is conjectured to be perhaps from PIE *(dh)ghomon-, literally “earthling,” from *dhghem- “earth” (see chthonic; also compare human). Other Latin diminutives from homo included homullus, homuncio.

Homunculus-alchemical-creation

2014 show 258 nov 19

The Difference Between What is Real and what is Fiction! Ohio Judge Tells Man He’s Dead. “I am Christian,” the surname is “I belong to the Church.” POPE

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Tonight’s topic among others: The Difference Between What is Real and what is Fiction! An Ohio Man is Declared “Legally Dead”, He had fallen into Grace, but insisted on being the Fictional Man! Daniel Introduces the Paper: “The Trial of Jesus


Ohio Judge Tells Man He’s Still Legally Dead

Donald Miller Jr.
donn.
1520s, from Spanish or Portuguese don, title of respect, from Latin dominus “lord, master.” The university sense is c. 1660, originally student slang; underworld sense is 1952, from Italian don, from Late Latin domnus, from Latin dominus (see domain). The fem. form is Dona (Spanish/Portuguese), Donna (Italian).
mill (n.2)
“one-tenth cent,” 1786, an original U.S. currency unit but now used only for tax calculation purposes shortening of Latin millesimum “one-thousandth,” from mille “a thousand” (see million). Formed on the analogy of cent, which is short for Latin centesimus “one hundredth” (of a dollar).


grace v.
c. 1200, “to thank,” from Old French graciier “thank, give thanks to; praise,” from grace “mercy, favor, thanks, virtue” (see grace n.). Meaning “to show favor” (mid-15c.) led to that of “to lend or add grace to something” (1580s, as in grace us with your presence), which is the root of the musical sense in grace notes (1650s). Related: Graced; gracing.
grace n.
late 12c., “God’s unmerited favor, love, or help,” from Old French grace “pardon, divine grace, mercy; favor, thanks; elegance, virtue” (12c., Modern French grâce), from Latin gratia “favor, esteem, regard; pleasing quality, good will, gratitude” (source of Italian grazia, Spanish gracia; in Church use translating Greek kharisma), from gratus “pleasing, agreeable,” from PIE *gwreto-, suffixed form of root *gwere- (3) “to favor” (cognates: Sanskrit grnati “sings, praises, announces,” Lithuanian giriu “to praise, celebrate,” Avestan gar- “to praise”).

Sense of “virtue” is early 14c., that of “beauty of form or movement, pleasing quality” is mid-14c. In classical sense, “one of the three sister goddesses (Latin Gratiæ, Greek Kharites), bestowers of beauty and charm,” it is first recorded in English 1579 in Spenser. In music, “an embellishment not essential to the melody or harmony,” 1650s. As the name of the short prayer that is said before or after a meal (early 13c.; until 16c. usually graces) it has a sense of “gratitude.” As a title of honor, c. 1500.


lie n.
“an untruth,” Old English lyge “lie, falsehood,” from Proto-Germanic *lugiz (cognates: Old Norse lygi, Danish løgn, Old Frisian leyne (fem.), Dutch leugen (fem.), Old High German lugi, German Lüge, Gothic liugn “a lie”), from the root of lie (v.1). To give the lie to “accuse directly of lying” is attested from 1590s. Lie-detector first recorded 1909.


Mark 15:26 Wycliffe Bible Wyc
26 And the title of his cause was written, King of Jews.

The Shepherd of Jerusalem by Philip Richard Morris - Date painted: 1871 - Oil on canvas, 246.4 x 108 cm
The Shepherd of Jerusalem by Philip Richard Morris – Date painted: 1871

The Trial of Jesus
There is so much mysticism and confusion surrounding the crucifixion and resurrection that we lose sight of the fact that Jesus of Nazareth was a man tried before a court of men under laws of men, that he was convicted and executed as a man, and that for sheer drama the trial of Jesus surely matches any of the great courtroom stories in the history of human justice…
Matthew Henry’s Commentary – Luke Verses 39 – 46
We have here the awful story of Christ’s agony in the garden, just before he was betrayed, which was largely related by the other evangelists. In it Christ accommodated himself to that part of his undertaking which he was now entering upon—the making of his soul an offering for sin.

Clint’s interview with Frederick Graves (How to Win in Court!) show 252 nov 10
magistrate


magistrate n.
late 14c., “civil officer in charge of administering laws,” from Old French magistrat, from Latin magistratus “a magistrate, public functionary,” originally “magisterial rank or office,” from magistrare “serve as a magistrate,” from magister “chief, director” (see master). Related: Magistracy.
magistrate v.
intr. To domineer, or behave like a master.


employ n.
1660s, “action of employing,” from French emploi, from Middle French verb employer (see employ v.). From 1709 as “state of being employed.”
employ v.
early 15c., “apply or devote (something to some purpose); expend or spend,” from Old French emploiier (12c.) “make use of, apply; increase; entangle; devote,” from Latin implicare “enfold, involve, be connected with, unite, associate,” from assimilated form of in- (see in- (2)) + plicare “to fold” (see ply (v.1)). Imply, which is the same word, retains more of the original sense. Sense of “hire, engage” first recorded in English 1580s, from meaning “involve in a particular purpose,” which arose in Late Latin. Related: Employed; employing; employable.
em
word-forming element meaning “put in or into, bring to a certain state,” sometimes intensive, from French assimilation of en- “in, into” (see en- (1)) to following labial stop (-b-, -p-, and often -m-), or from the same development in later Latin in- (to im-). “This rule was not fully established in spelling before the 17th c.” [OED], but it is likely the pronunciation shift was in Old French and Middle English and spelling was slow to conform. Also a living prefix in English used to form verbs from adjectives and nouns (embitter, embody). In words such as emancipate, emerge, emit, emotion the e- is a reduced form of Latin ex- (see ex-) before -m-.
ploy n.1 Forms: lME–15 ploye, 16–17 ploy.
Etymology: A borrowing from French. Etymons: French ploi.
Middle French ploi, ploy state, situation, condition (12th cent. in Old French), fold (13th cent.) : plier ply v.1 Compare ply n. Compare (ultimately : French) Middle Dutch plooye, ploye (Dutch plooi), Middle Low German ploy fold, condition (especially good condition).
Obs. Categories >> 1. Plight, condition; = ply n. 1. rare.
1. orig. Sc. An activity in which one engages; a personal enterprise or undertaking, esp. for amusement; a pastime; an escapade, a caper.
2. A stratagem suggested by particular circumstances and employed to gain a calculated advantage, freq. against an opponent; a cunning scheme or manoeuvre. (Now the usual sense.)


tau (Τ τ) :
nineteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, from Hebrew taw, last letter of the Hebrew alphabet, literally “sign, mark.”
In ancient times, Tau was used as a symbol for life and/or resurrection, whereas the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, theta, was considered the symbol of death.
In Biblical times, the Taw was put on men to distinguish those who lamented sin, although newer versions of the Bible have replaced the ancient term “Taw” with “mark” (Ezekiel 9:4) or “signature” (Job 31:35).
title n.
Etymology: Middle English Old French title (12th cent. in Godefroy Compl.) Latin titulus superscription, title; in modern French titre. Old English titul was directly Latin, as is the later by-form titule.
The i in Old English and early Middle English was probably short, after Latin: see also tittle n.
Forms: OE titul; ME tytel, tytele, ME titel, (ME titell), tityll, ME–15 titil, titill, (ME titille), ME–16 tytle, ME titul, titulle, ( tetle), ME–15 tytill, tytille, ME–16 tytyl, tytel(l, tytile, titile, (15 tetel), 17 titule, ME– title; also 15 tyttel, tytyll.
4. A descriptive or distinctive appellation; a name, denomination, style.
a. An appellation attaching to an individual or family in virtue of rank, function, office, or attainment, or the possession of or association with certain lands, etc.; esp. an appellation of honour pertaining to a person of high rank; also transf. (colloq.) a person of title
6. That which justifies or substantiates a claim; a ground of right; hence, an alleged or recognized right. Const. with inf., or to, in, of the thing claimed.
ty suffix
Forming ns. denoting quality or condition, representing Middle English –tie -tee, -te (early Middle English -teð), from Old French -te (modern French -té), earlier -tet (-ted):—Latin -itātem, nom. -itās. Such Latin types as bonitātem, feritātem…
The early form of the suffix (-te, or -tee) remained in use down to the 16th cent., but from the 15th was gradually supplanted by –tietye and the surviving –ty.

tie n.
1. That with which anything is tied; a cord, band, or the like, used for fastening something; a knot, noose or ligature; a natural formation of this kind, a ligament (quot. 1659 at β. ); esp. an ornamental knot or bow of ribbon, etc.
a. gen. Something that connects or unites two or more things in some way; a link.
8. fig. Something that ties or binds in a figurative or abstract sense.
a. Something that makes fast or secures; a security; something figured as a band or knot with which things are tied. rare.

tell v.
Old English tellan “to reckon, calculate, number, compute; consider, think, esteem, account” (past tense tealde, past participle teald), from Proto-Germanic *taljan “to mention in order” (cognates: Old Saxon tellian “tell,” Old Norse telja “to count, number; to tell, say,” Old Frisian tella “to count; to tell,” Middle Dutch and Dutch tellen, Old Saxon talon “to count, reckon,” Danish tale “to speak,” Old High German zalon, German zählen “to count, reckon”), from PIE root *del- (2) “to count, reckon” (see tale).

Meaning “to narrate, announce, relate” in English is from c. 1000; that of “to make known by speech or writing announce” is from early 12c. Sense of “to reveal or disclose” is from c. 1400; that of “to act as an informer to ‘peach’ ” is recorded from 1901. Meaning “to order (someone to do something)” is from 1590s. To tell (someone) off “reprimand” is from 1919.

Original sense in teller and phrase to tell time. For sense evolution, compare French conter “to count,” raconter “to recount;” Italian contare, Spanish contar “to count, recount, narrate;” German zählen “to count,” erzählen “to recount, narrate.” Klein also compares Hebrew saphar “he counted” sipper “he told.”
teller n.
“bank clerk who pays or receives money,” late 15c., “person who keeps accounts” agent noun from tell v. in its secondary sense of “count, enumerate” which is the primary sense of cognate words in many Germanic languages. Earlier “person who announces or narrates” (c. 1300).
le
instrumental word-forming element, the usual modern form of –el (1), a suffix originally used in Old English to form agent nouns.
el (1)
instrumental suffix, from Old English -ol, -ul, –el representing PIE *-lo- (see –ule). In modern English usually –le except after -n-.
El : El Canaanite god (deity)
[ El, the heavy drinking father and creator of the Canaanite gods, goddesses, and mankind, is also known as the bull. As well as being the name of a particular bull god, El is a Semitic word for god. Taken from none trusted sources ]
ule
word-forming element meaning “small, little” (in capsule, module, etc.), from French -ule, from Latin diminutive suffix –ulus (fem. -ula, neuter -ulum), from PIE *-(o)lo-, from *-lo-, secondary suffix forming diminutives, which also is the source of the first element in native diminutive suffix -ling.
yule n.
2. Christmas and the festivities connected therewith. (Still the name in Sc. and north. dial.; since c1850 also a literary archaism in English). Freshly cut Log made kept burning for an extended length of time. Small pieces of old burned log ignite a new Yule log yearly.


lie (v.2)
“rest horizontally,” early 12c., from Old English licgan (class V strong verb; past tense læg, past participle legen) “be situated, remain; be at rest lie down,” from Proto-Germanic *legjan (cognates: Old Norse liggja, Old Frisian lidzia, Middle Dutch ligghen, Dutch liggen, Old High German ligen, German liegen, Gothic ligan), from PIE *legh- “to lie, lay” (cognates: Hittite laggari “falls, lies,” Greek lekhesthai “to lie down,” Latin lectus “bed,” Old Church Slavonic lego “to lie down” Lithuanian at-lagai “fallow land,” Old Irish laigim “I lie down,” Irish luighe “couch, grave”). To lie with “have sexual intercourse” is from c. 1300, and compare Old English licgan mid “cohabit with.” To take (something) lying down “passively, submissively” is from 1854.

able adj.
early 14c., from Old French (h)able (14c.), from Latin habilem, habilis “easily handled apt,” verbal adjective from habere “to hold” (see habit). “Easy to be held,” hence “fit for a purpose.” The silent h- was dropped in English and resisted academic attempts to restore it 16c.-17c. (see H), but some derivatives (such as habiliment, habilitate) acquired it via French.

rest n.2
†4. An act of seizing or taking into custody a person, goods, etc.; seizure, capture. Obs.

Mark 15:26 Wycliffe Bible (WYC)
26 And the title of his cause was written, King of Jews.

John 19:20 Wycliffe Bible (WYC)
20 Therefore many of the Jews read this title, for the place where Jesus was crucified, was nigh the city, and it was written in Hebrew, Greek, and Latin.


capital adj.
early 13c., “of or pertaining to the head” from Old French capital, from Latin capitalis “of the head,” hence “capital, chief, first,” from caput (genitive capitis) “head” (see capitulum). Meaning “main, principal, chief, dominant, most important” is from early 15c. in English. Capital letter for an upper case one is attested from late 14c. The modern informal sense of “excellent, first-rate” is dated from 1762 in OED (as an exclamation of approval, OED’s first example is 1875), perhaps from earlier use of the word in reference to ships, “first-rate, powerful enough to be in the line of battle,” attested from 1650s, fallen into disuse after 1918.

A capital crime (1520s) is one that affects the life or “head;” capital had a sense of “deadly, mortal” from late 14c. in English, a sense also found in Latin. The felt connection between “head” and “life, mortality” also existed in Old English: as in heafodgilt “deadly sin, capital offense,” heafdes þolian “to forfeit life.” Capital punishment was in Blackstone (1765) and classical Latin capitis poena. Capital gain is recorded from 1921. Capital goods is recorded from 1899. Related: Capitally.


surety n.
c. 1300, “a guarantee, promise, pledge, an assurance,” from Old French seurté “a promise, pledge, guarantee; assurance, confidence” (12c., Modern French sûreté), from Latin securitatem (nominative securitas) “freedom from care or danger, safety, security,” from securus (see secure (adj.)). From late 14c. as “security, safety, stability; state of peace,” also “certainty, certitude; confidence.” Meaning “one who makes himself responsible for another” is from early 15c. Until 1966, the French national criminal police department was the Sûreté nationale.


constable n.
Etymology: Middle English, Old French cunestable, conestable (modern French connétable = Provençal conestable, Spanish condestable, Portuguese condestavel, Italian conestabile), repr. late Latin comes stabulī count or officer of the stable, marshal (in the Theodosian Code a.d. 438, Gregory of Tours 575), corresponding to the earlier tribūnus stabulī (Ammianus), whence later comesta-, conestabulus: Skeat quotes from a document under date 807, ‘comes stabuli quem corrupte conestabulum appellamus’. Other medieval Latin forms were comestabilis, conestabilis, etc.: see Du Cange. The early development of the sense, whereby the comes stabuli, from being the head groom of the stable, became the principal officer of the household of the Frankish kings, and of the great feudatories, and the field-marshal or commander-general of the army, had taken place before the word came into English; the development was parallel to that of marshal. The earlier English uses were simply taken over from French.

c. Petty Constable n. (also Parish Constable) an officer of a parish or township appointed to act as conservator of the peace and to perform a number of public administrative duties in his district. (Abolished, exc. as incorporated in the County Police system, in 1872.) 1472 — 1872

d. Now, esp., a police constable a member of the constabulary or police force, a policeman. Chief Constable n. the officer at the head of the police force of a county or equivalent district.Special Constable: see the first element. 1839 — 1885


adverse adj.
late 14c., “contrary, opposing,” from Old French avers (13c., Modern French adverse) “antagonistic, unfriendly, contrary, foreign” (as in gent avers “infidel race”), from Latin adversus “turned against, turned toward, fronting, facing,” figuratively “hostile, adverse, unfavorable,” past participle of advertere, from ad- “to” (see ad-) + vertere “to turn” (see versus). For distinction of use, see see averse. Related: Adversely.
adversity n.
c. 1200, aduersite “misfortune, hardship, difficulty,” from Old French aversité “adversity, calamity, misfortune; hostility, wickedness, malice” (Modern French adversité), from Latin adversitatem (nominative adversitas) “opposition,” from adversus (see adverse).
adversary n.
mid-14c., aduersere, from Anglo-French adverser (13c.), Old French adversaire “adversary, opponent, enemy,” or directly from Latin adversarius “opponent, adversary, rival,” noun use of adjective meaning “opposite, hostile, contrary,” literally “turned toward one,” from adversus “turned against” (see adverse). The Latin word is glossed in Old English by wiðerbroca.

trespass n.
Etymology: Middle English trespas , Old French trespas passing across, passage, transgression of an order or law, offence, verbal noun : trespasser , modern French trépasser to pass away, die: see trespass v. The legal application of the words seems specially English.
1. A transgression; a breach of law or duty; an offence, sin, wrong; a fault.
2. Law. In a wide sense, Any violation or transgression of the law; spec. one not amounting to treason, felony, or misprision of either.
3. Law. spec. Any actionable wrong committed against the person or property of another; also short for action of trespass.
4. A passing beyond some limit. Now generally associated with trespass v. 4. rare.
1798 C. Smith Young Philosopher I. 49 He was frequently involved in scrapes for harmless frolics and trespasses out of bounds.
5. An encroachment, intrusion on or upon: cf. trespass v. 5.
1769 O. Goldsmith Rom. Hist. II. 23 Mankind are ever most offended at any trespass on ceremony.


solution n.
Etymology: Old French solucion, -tion (modern French solution , = Spanish solucion , Italian soluzione ) or Latin solūtiōn- , solūtio , participial stem of solvĕre solve v
a. The action or process of solving; the state, condition, or fact of being solved.
b. A particular instance or method of solving or settling; an explanation, answer, or decision.
c. Med. The termination or crisis of a disease.
2. The action of releasing or setting free; deliverance, release. Obs.
3. The action of paying; a payment. Obs.

deliverance n.
Etymology: Old French delivrance, desl- (12th cent. in Littré) = Provençal delivransa , desl- , délivrer , delivrar to deliver adj.: see -ance suffix.
a. The action of delivering or setting free, or fact of being set free (†of, from confinement, danger, evil, etc.); liberation, release, rescue.
c. In the ritual observed at a criminal trial.It is possible that this has been in later times associated with the ‘true deliverance’ of the Jury: see 8b.


execution n.
Etymology: Middle English execucion , Anglo-Norman execucioun, French exécution, Latin execūtiōn-em , exsecūtiōn-em , noun of action – ex(s)equī : see execute v.Etymology: Middle English execucion , Anglo-Norman execucioun, French exécution, – Latin execūtiōn-em , exsecūtiōn-em , noun of action – ex(s)equī : see execute v.
a. The action of carrying into effect (a plan, design, purpose, command, decree, task, etc.); accomplishment: an instance of this. Also, to carry into execution, †to order into execution, to put in execution or to put into execution.
a. The performance or fulfilment (of an office or function). to put in execution: to execute.
6. Law. The due performance of all formalities, as signing, sealing, etc., necessary to give validity to a deed or other legal document.


Thomas Cromwell: Come, let us drink to the King’s marriage and an early issue
Cardinal Wolsey: To issue.
Thomas Cromwell: Issue.
Cardinal Wolsey: All fall down!
Thomas Cromwell: Oh, my God!

Best use of the word issue v. ever.. The entire film makes great capital with the word and other obscure old English words, it’s well worth watching – Carry on Henry. It’s also a very good historical truism in many respects. The use and abuse of language runs though most Carry on films, normally as innuendo.

Thomas Cromwell reads out Sir Roger de Lodgerley’s confession in Carry on Henry.
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issue v.
c. 1300, “to flow out,” from issue n. or else from Old French issu, past participle of issir. Sense of “to send out authoritatively” is from c. 1600; that of “to supply (someone with something)” is from 1925. Related: Issued; issuing.
issue n.
c. 1300, “exit, a going out, flowing out,” from Old French issue “a way out, exit,” from fem. past participle of issir “to go out,” from Latin exire (source also of Italian uscire, Catalan exir), from ex- “out” (see ex-) + ire “to go,” from PIE root *ei- “to go” (see ion).

Meaning “discharge of blood or other fluid from the body” is from 1520s; sense of “offspring” is from late 14c. Meaning “outcome of an action” is attested from late 14c., probably from French; legal sense of “point in question at the conclusion of the presentation by both parties in a suit” (early 14c. in Anglo-French) led to transferred sense of “a point to be decided” (1836). Meaning “action of sending into publication or circulation” is from 1833.


death n.
Old English deað “death, dying, cause of death,” in plura, “ghosts,” from Proto-Germanic *dauthuz (cognates: Old Saxon doth, Old Frisian dath, Dutch dood, Old High German tod, German Tod, Old Norse dauði, Danish død, Swedish död, Gothic dauþus “death”), from verbal stem *dheu- (3) “to die” (see die v.) + *-thuz suffix indicating “act, process, condition.”

I would not that death should take me asleep. I would not have him meerly seise me, and onely declare me to be dead, but win me, and overcome me. When I must shipwrack, I would do it in a sea, where mine impotencie might have some excuse; not in a sullen weedy lake, where I could not have so much as exercise for my swimming. [John Donne, letter to Sir Henry Goodere, Sept. 1608]

Death’s-head, a symbol of mortality, is from 1590s. Death row first recorded 1940s. Death knell is attested from 1814; death penalty from 1875; death rate from 1859. Slang be death on “be very good at” is from 1839. Death wish first recorded 1896. The death-watch beetle (1660s) inhabits houses, makes a ticking noise like a watch, and was superstitiously supposed to portend death.

1. The act or fact of dying; the end of life; the permanent cessation of the vital functions of a person, animal, plant, or other organism. Also: an instance of this; (with specification) a manner of dying.accidental, natural, quick, sudden death etc., cot, martyr, road, stage death, etc.: see the first element.
a. Of an individual.

b. As an abstract principle.
?1518 A. Barclay tr. D. Mancinus Myrrour Good Maners sig. Eiiv, What shulde he drede of dethe, it is ineuytable.
1866 J. R. Seeley Ecce Homo iv. 37 The Greek did not even in the earliest times believe death to be annihilation.

d. As a sentence or punishment for a crime, etc.; execution; the death penalty, a death sentence. Cf. Phrases 1a(b), life n. 8b.

a. In Christianity and some other religious traditions: existence in a state of sin and unregeneracy, either during or after earthly life (more fully spiritual death; opposed to spiritual life: see life n. 3). Also: the punishment of lost souls after physical death, the state of being damned to eternal suffering (more fully eternal death, everlasting death).


fideism n.
in various theological doctrines making knowledge dependent on faith, 1885, from Latin fides “faith” (see faith) + -ism.
defender n.
c. 1300 (early 13c. as a surname), via Anglo-French, from Old French defendeor, agent noun from defendre (see defend). The Latin word in this sense was defensor.
b. defender of the faith : a title borne by the sovereigns of England since Henry VIII, on whom it (i.e. Fidei defensor) was conferred by Pope Leo X in 1521 as a reward for writing against Luther. Cf. defensor n.


registrar general n. a senior official responsible for the control and safe keeping of records; spec. (chiefly Brit. and in some Commonwealth countries) a state officer at the head of the national system under which all births, marriages, and deaths are registered and recorded, and censuses taken. See general adj. 8a.

1790 Ann. Reg. 1788 160/1 Gunga Govind Sing, whose son was registrar-general of the province, and had in his custody the documents upon which the legal merits of the cause might depend.

1908 Canad. Practitioner & Rev. June 398 The Registrar-General, upon proper presentation of the facts, may appoint sub-registrars for the purpose of issuing certificates of registration of death.

tribunal n. adj
a. A court of justice; a judicial assembly.
b. fig. Place of judgement or decision; judicial authority.

highcrimes

The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea


doom n.
Etymology: Common Germanic noun: Old English dóm —Old Frisian, Old Saxon dóm..
1. A statute, law, enactment; gen. an ordinance, decree. Obs. exc. Hist.
2. A judgement or decision, esp. one formally pronounced; a sentence; mostly in adverse sense, condemnation, sentence of punishment.
deem n.
Judgement, opinion, thought, surmise.
1648 E. Symmons Vindic. King Charles 292 Much wrong should they have in the world’s deem.


It is like a surname: if the name is “I am Christian,” the surname is “I belong to the Church.”
We are not isolated and we are not Christians as individuals, each one on his own. No. Our Christian identity is belonging! We are Christians because we belong to the Church. It is like a surname: if the name is I am Christian, the surname is I belong to the Church. It is beautiful to note how this belonging is expressed also in the name that God attributes to Himself. Responding to Moses, in the wonderful episode of the burning bush (cf. Exodus 3:15), He describes Himself, in fact, as the God of the Fathers. He does not say: I am Omnipotent …, no: I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob. In this way, he calls us to enter into this relation that precedes us. God’s relation with His people precedes us all, it comes from that time. audience address on belonging to the church
Also mentioned in 2014 show 265 dec 03


Matthew 7:21
21 Not every man that saith to me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heavens; but he that doeth the will of my Father that is in heavens, he shall enter into the kingdom of heavens.

Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us. Galatians 3:13. Titus 2:14.

2014 show 244 oct 29

It’s Halloween in Utah “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law”, Ave Maria, cut a cheque, kiss a Pope, pick a bale of cotton & a caller with a dim view of the “So called Bible”. Ok!

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Tonight’s topic among others: It’s Halloween in Utah and Clint forgets to Phone Daniel and Circumventing the 10 Commandments!


The Ten Commandments Exodus 20:2-17 Nkjv

1 I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. You shall have no other gods before Me.

2 You shall not make for yourself a carved image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth; you shall not bow down to them nor serve them. For I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children to the third and fourth generations of those who hate Me, but showing mercy to thousands, to those who love Me and keep My Commandments.

3 You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain, for the Lord will not hold him guiltless who takes His name in vain.

4 Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. In it you shall do no work: you, nor your son, nor your daughter, nor your male servant, nor your female servant, nor your cattle, nor your stranger who is within your gates. For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and hallowed it.

5 Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be long upon the land which the Lord your God is giving you.

6 You shall not murder.

7 You shall not commit adultery.

8 You shall not steal.

9 You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.

10 You shall not covet your neighbor’s house; you shall not covet your neighbor’s wife, nor his male servant, nor his female servant, nor his ox, nor his donkey, nor anything that is your neighbor’s.”


Colossians 2:14 kjv
14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;


The Greeson-Zecca & Mastropalo Debate on What Law are We Under Today? .pdf

Paul confirmed Jesus’ fulfillment of the Law and it’s passing. Through Christ, Christians are “made alive together with Him, having forgiven you all trespasses, having wiped out the hand-writing of requirements that was against us,
which was contrary to us. And He has taken it out of the way, having nailed it to the cross …So let no one judge you in food or in drink, or regarding a festival or a new moon or Sabbaths, which are a shadow of things to come, but the substance is of “Christ” (Col. 2:13-17). The cross was the culmina-tion of Christ’s fulfillment of the Old Testament Law and prophets. By Christ’s death the Law was nailed to the cross and taken out of the way. The Law, including the Sabbath, is no longer binding…

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the LawAleister Crowley


pardon v.
mid-15c., “to forgive for offense or sin,” from Old French pardoner (see pardon n.).
I grant you pardon,’ said Louis XV to Charolais, who, to divert himself, had just killed a man; ‘but I also pardon whoever will kill you.’ [Marquis de Sade, “Philosophy in the Bedroom”]
Related: Pardoned; pardoning. Pardon my French as exclamation of apology for obscene language is from 1895.

pardon n.
late 13c., “papal indulgence,” from Old French pardon, from pardoner “to grant; forgive” (11c., Modern French pardonner), “to grant, forgive,” from Vulgar Latin perdonare “to give wholeheartedly, to remit,” from Latin per- “through, thoroughly” (see per) + donare “give, present” (see donation).
Meaning “passing over an offense without punishment” is from c. 1300, also in the strictly ecclesiastical sense; sense of “pardon for a civil or criminal offense; release from penalty or obligation” is from late 14c. earlier in Anglo-French. Weaker sense of “excuse for a minor fault” is attested from 1540s.


Romans 12:17 Kjv.
17 Recompense to no man evil for evil. Provide things honest in the sight of all men.


keeper n.
c. 1300 (late 13c. as a surname), “one who has charge of some person or thing, warden,” agent noun from keep v.. Sense of “one who carries on some business” is from mid-15c. Sporting sense (originally cricket) is from 1744. Meaning “something (or someone) worth keeping” is attested by 1999. Brother’s keeper is from Genesis iv:9.

peace n.
mid-12c., “freedom from civil disorder,” from Anglo-French pes, Old French pais “peace, reconciliation, silence, permission” (11c., Modern French paix), from Latin pacem (nominative pax) “compact, agreement, treaty of peace, tranquility, absence of war” (source of Provençal patz, Spanish paz, Italian pace), from PIE pag-/pak- “fasten,” related to pacisci “to covenant or agree” (see pact).

peace-keeping n.
also peacekeeping, 1961 in the international sense, from peace + keeping, verbal noun from keep v.. Earlier “preservation of law and order” (mid-15c.). Related: Peace-keeper (1570s).

keep v.
late Old English cepan “to seize, hold,” also “to observe,” from Proto-Germanic kopijan, but with no certain connection to other languages. It possibly is related to Old English capian “to look,” from Proto-Germanic kap- (cepan was used c. 1000 to render Latin observare), which would make the basic sense “to keep an eye on.”


Noon Rest From Work - After Millet
Noon: Rest From Work (After Millet). Gogh, Vincent van. Oil on canvas. 73.0 x 91.0 cm.

rest v.
“sleep,” Old English ræste, reste “rest, bed, intermission of labor, mental peace,” common Germanic (Old Saxon resta “resting place, burial-place,” Dutch rust, Old High German rasta, German Rast “rest, peace, repose”), of uncertain origin.
rest v.
“remainder, that which is left after a separation,” early 15c., from Middle French reste “remnant,” from rester “to remain” (see rest (v.2)). Meaning “others, those not included in a proposition” is from 1530s.


Re
“with reference to,” used from c. 1700 in legalese, from Latin (in) re “in the matter of,” from ablative case of res “matter, thing.” Its use is execrated by Fowler in three different sections of “Modern English Usage.”
Ra
Ra or Re is the ancient Egyptian sun god. By the Fifth Dynasty in the 25th & 24th centuries, he had become a major god in ancient Egyptian religion, identified primarily with the noon sun.
re
word-forming element meaning “back to the original place; again, anew, once more,” also with a sense of “undoing,” c. 1200, from Old French and directly from Latin re- “again, back, anew, against,” “Latin combining form conceivably from Indo-European wret-, metathetical variant of wert- “to turn” [Watkins]. Often merely intensive, and in many of the older borrowings from French and Latin the precise sense of re- is lost in secondary senses or weakened beyond recognition. OED writes that it is “impossible to attempt a complete record of all the forms resulting from its use,” and adds that “The number of these is practically infinite ….” The Latin prefix became red- before vowels and h-, as in redact, redeem, redolent, redundant.
pre
word-forming element meaning “before,” from Old French pre- and Medieval Latin pre-, both from Latin prae (adverb and preposition) “before in time or place,” from PIE peri- (cognates: Oscan prai, Umbrian pre, Sanskrit pare “thereupon,” Greek parai “at,” Gaulish are- “at, before,” Lithuanian pre “at,” Old Church Slavonic pri “at,” Gothic faura, Old English fore “before”), extended form of root per- (1) “beyond” (see per).

The Latin word was active in forming verbs. Also see prae-. Sometimes in Middle English muddled with words in pro- or per-.

press n.
c. 1300, presse, “crowd, throng, company; crowding and jostling of a throng; a massing together,” from Old French presse n. “throng, crush, crowd; wine or cheese press” (11c.), from Latin pressare (see press (v.1)). Late Old English had press “clothes press.”
press v.
“force into service,” 1570s, alteration (by association with press (v.1)) of prest (mid-14c.) “engage by loan, pay in advance,”
press v.
“push against,” early 14c., “to clasp, embrace;” mid-14c. “to squeeze out;” also “to cluster, gather in a crowd;” late 14c., “to press against, exert pressure,” also “assault, assail;” also “forge ahead, push one’s way, move forward,”
giant n.
c. 1300, “fabulous man-like creature of enormous size,” from Old French geant, earlier jaiant “giant, ogre” (12c.), from Vulgar Latin gagantem (nominative gagas), from Latin gigas “a giant,” from Greek Gigas (usually in plural, Gigantes), one of a race of divine but savage and monstrous beings (personifying destructive natural forces), sons of Gaia and Uranus, eventually destroyed by the gods. The word is of unknown origin, probably from a pre-Greek language. Derivation from gegenes “earth-born” is considered untenable.
Ent
*Dauid eóde to ánwíge ongeán ðone ent Goliam
David went in single combat against the giant Goliath,
ent, n.
late Latin ens, entis: see ens n. metaphor. rare.
ent
word-forming element making adjectives from nouns or verbs, from French -ent and directly from Latin -entem (nominative -ens), present participle ending of verbs in -ere/-ire. Old French changed it in many words to -ant, but after c. 1500 some of these in English were changed back to what was supposed to be correct Latin. See -ant.
cent n.
late 14c., from Latin centum “hundred” (see hundred). Middle English meaning was “one hundred,” but it shifted 17c. to “hundredth part” under influence of percent. Chosen in this sense in 1786 as a name for a U.S. currency unit by Continental Congress. The word first was suggested by Robert Morris in 1782 under a different currency plan. Before the cent, Revolutionary and colonial dollars were reckoned in ninetieths, based on the exchange rate of Pennsylvania money and Spanish coin.

represent v.
late 14c., “to bring to mind by description,” also “to symbolize, serve as a sign or symbol of; serve as the type or embodiment of;” from Old French representer “present, show, portray” (12c.), from Latin repraesentare “make present, set in view, show, exhibit, display,” from re-, intensive prefix (see re-), + praesentare “to present,” literally “to place before” (see present v.). Legislative sense is attested from 1650s. Related: Represented; representing.
representative adj.
“serving to represent,” late 14c., from Old French representatif (early 14c.), from Medieval Latin repraesentativus, from stem of Latin repraesentare (see represent). Meaning “standing for others” is from 1620s; in the political sense of “holding the place of the people in the government, having citizens represented by chosen persons” is first recorded 1620s. Meaning “pertaining to or founded on representation of the people” is from 1640s.
representation n.
c. 1400, “image, likeness,” from Old French representacion (14c.) and directly from Latin representationem (nominative representatio), noun of action from past participle stem of repraesentare (see represent). Meaning “statement made in regard to some matter” is from 1670s. Legislative sense first attested 1769.


The Return of the Prodigal Son
The Return of the Prodigal Son. 262 cm × 205 cm. Rembrandt van Rijn. Oil. 1661–1669

lie n.
“an untruth,” Old English lyge “lie, falsehood,” from Proto-Germanic lugiz (cognates: Old Norse lygi, Danish løgn, Old Frisian leyne (fem.), Dutch leugen (fem.), Old High German lugi, German Lüge, Gothic liugn “a lie”), from the root of lie (v.1). To give the lie to “accuse directly of lying” is attested from 1590s. Lie-detector first recorded 1909.

lier n.
“one who reclines;” 1580s, agent noun from lie (v.2).


ran
past tense of run v., Old English ran.
dom
abstract suffix of state, from Old English dom “statute, judgment” (see doom n.). Already active as a suffix in Old English (as in freodom, wisdom). Cognate with German -tum (Old High German tuom).


De facto : In fact, in deed, actually.
This phrase is used to characterize an officer, a govern­ment, a past action, or a state of affairs which must be accepted for all practical purposes, but is illegal or illegitimate.
Thus, an office, position or status exist­ing under a claim or color of right such as a de facto corporation. In this sense it is the contrary of de jure, which means rightful, legitimate, just, or consti­tutional.
Thus, an officer, king, or government de facto is one who is in actual possession of the office or supreme power, but by usurpation, or without lawful title; while an officer, king, or governor de jure is one who has just claim and rightful title to the office or power, but has never had plenary possession of it, or is not in actual possession.
MacLeod v. United States, 229 U.S. 4 1 6, 33 S.Ct. 955, 57 L.Ed.1260.
Blacks Law 4th edition P:375


prodigal adj.
mid-15c., a back-formation from prodigality, or else from Middle French prodigal and directly from Late Latin prodigalis, from Latin prodigus “wasteful,” from prodigere “drive away, waste,” from pro- “forth” (see pro-) + agere “to drive” (see act v.). First reference is to prodigial son, from Vulgate Latin filius prodigus (Luke xv:11-32). As a noun, “prodigal person,” 1590s, from the adjective (the Latin adjective also was used as a noun).

driver n.
“one who drives” in various senses, c. 1400; agent noun from drive v.. Slavery sense is attested by 1796. Driver’s seat is attested by 1867; figurative use by 1954.
2. The person who drives beasts.


design v.
1540s, from Latin designare “mark out, devise, choose, designate, appoint,” from de- “out” (see de-) + signare “to mark,” from signum “a mark, sign” (see sign n.). Originally in English with the meaning now attached to designate; many modern uses of design are metaphoric extensions. Related: Designed; designing.


licence n.
mid-14c., “liberty (to do something), leave,” from Old French licence “freedom, liberty, power, possibility; permission,” (12c.), from Latin licentia “freedom, liberty, license,” from licentem (nominative licens), present participle of licere “to be allowed, be lawful,” from PIE root leik- “to offer, bargain” (cognates: Lettish likstu “I come to terms”). Meaning “formal (usually written) permission from authority to do something” (marry, hunt, drive, etc.) is first attested early 15c. Meaning “excessive liberty, disregard of propriety” is from mid-15c. There have been attempts to confine license to verbal use and licence to noun use (compare advise/advice, devise/device.

licence v.
c. 1400, “grant formal authorization,” from license n.. Related: Licenced; Licencing.

certificate n.
early 15c., “action of certifying,” from French certificat, from Medieval Latin certificatum “thing certified,” noun use of neuter past participle of certificare (see certify). Of documents, from mid-15c., especially a document which attests to someone’s authorization to practice or do something (1540s).


colon n.
“large intestine,” late 14c., from Latinized form of Greek kolon (with a short initial -o-) “large intestine,” which is of unknown origin.

colony n.
late 14c., “ancient Roman settlement outside Italy,” from Latin colonia “settled land, farm, landed estate,” from colonus “husbandman, tenant farmer, settler in new land,” from colere “to inhabit, cultivate, frequent, practice, tend, guard, respect,” from PIE root kwel- (1) “move around” (source of Latin -cola “inhabitant;” see cycle n.). Also used by the Romans to translate Greek apoikia “people from home.” Modern application dates from 1540s.


auto
word-forming element meaning “self, one’s own, by oneself,” from Greek auto- “self, one’s own,” combining form of autos “self, same,” which is of unknown origin. Before a vowel, aut-; before an aspirate, auth-. In Greek also used as a prefix to proper names, as in automelinna “Melinna herself.” The opposite prefix would be allo-.
graph
modern word-forming element meaning “instrument for recording; that which writes, marks, or describes; something written,” from Greek -graphos “-writing, -writer” (as in autographos “written with one’s own hand”), from graphe “writing, the art of writing, a writing,” from graphein “to write, express by written characters,” earlier “to draw, represent by lines drawn” (see -graphy). Adopted widely (Dutch -graaf, German -graph, French -graphe, Spanish -grafo). Related: -grapher; -graphic; -graphical.


signature n.
1530s, a kind of document in Scottish law, from Middle French signature (16c.) or directly from Medieval Latin signatura “signature, a rescript,” in classical Latin “the matrix of a seal,” from signatus, past participle of signare “to mark with a stamp, sign” (see sign v.).
Meaning “one’s own name written in one’s own hand” is from 1570s, replacing sign-manual (early 15c.) in this sense. Musical sense of “signs placed it the beginning of a staff to indicate the key and rhythm” is from 1806. Meaning “a distinguishing mark of any kind” is from 1620s
SIG,
a Saxon word signifying victory. is used in names, as in Sigbert, bright victory. In answers to the Greek vix in Nicander, and the Latin vic, in Victorinus.
nay
word of negation, late 12c., from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse nei, compound of ne “not” (see un-) + ei “ever” (see aye (2)).
, ; adv.No, not; non.
Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional na,
na, conj. Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional (north-west.) 19– na. Etymology : Perhaps formed within English, by compounding. Etymons: English na , no conj.1
tau (Τ τ) :
nineteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, from Hebrew taw, last letter of the Hebrew alphabet, literally “sign, mark.”
In ancient times, Tau was used as a symbol for life and/or resurrection, whereas the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, theta, was considered the symbol of death.
In Biblical times, the Taw was put on men to distinguish those who lamented sin, although newer versions of the Bible have replaced the ancient term “Taw” with “mark” (Ezekiel 9:4) or “signature” (Job 31:35).
ur, (n). An inarticulate sound, uttered instead of a word that the speaker is unable to remember or bring out.
úre gen. pl. of personal pronoun of first person. Of us Adam can yfel and gód, swá swá úre sum (quasi unus ex nobis ), Gen. 3, 22.
úre adj. pronoun. I. our
ure, n.1
Etymology: Anglo-Norman eure, = Old French uevre , euvre , evre (13th cent.; French œuvre ) Latin opera opera n.2
I. in ure:
a. In or into use, practice, or performance. Often with vbs., as bring, come, have, and esp. put (freq. c1510–1630). Also rarely with into.
b. With dependent infinitive.
c. With reference to statutes, etc.: In or into effect, force, or operation. Chiefly with vbs., esp. put.
d. In remembrance or recollection. Only to have..in ure.
e. In or into a state of prevalence or existence. Chiefly with vbs., as come, draw, put.
ure, suffix2
Etymology: French -ure (in e.g. dasyure dasyure n.) and its etymon scientific Latin -urus (also -ura: see note) : ancient Greek οὐρά tail (see uro- comb. form2).
Scientific Latin -urus is found in genus names from 1758 (e.g. Trichiurus trichiure n. at trichiurid n. Derivatives) and -ura from 1764 (e.g. Xiphosura xiphosure n. at xiphosuran adj. and n. Derivatives).
-re
nature n.
late 13c., “restorative powers of the body, bodily processes; powers of growth;” from Old French nature “nature, being, principle of life; character, essence,” from Latin natura “course of things; natural character, constitution, quality; the universe,” literally “birth,” from natus “born,” past participle of nasci “to be born,” from PIE gene- “to give birth, beget” (see genus).

1 Strong’s Number: g5449 Greek: phusis – Nature:
from phuo, “to bring forth, produce,” signifies
(a) “the nature” (i.e., the natural powers of constitution) of a person or thing, Eph 2:3; Jam 3:7 (“kind”); 2Pe 1:4;
(b) “origin, birth,” Rom 2:27, one who by birth is a Gentile, uncircumcised, in contrast to one who, though circumcised, has become spiritually uncircumcised by his iniquity; Gal 2:15;
(c) “the regular law or order of nature,” Rom 1:26, against “nature” (para, “against”); Rom 2:14, adverbially, “by nature” (for Rom 11:21, 24, see NATURAL, Note); 1Cr 11:14; Gal 4:8, “by nature (are no gods),” here “nature” is the emphatic word, and the phrase includes demons, men regarded as deified, and idols; these are gods only in name (the negative, me, denies not simply that they were gods, but the possibility that they could be).

2014 show 234 oct 15

Clint returns from Holidays this evening with a beautiful story + I’M MAD AS HELL AND I’M NOT GONNA TAKE THIS ANYMORE.

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Tonight’s topic among others: The show has been running for just over a year, Happy one year anniversary Corporation nation and an Analysis of Matthew  6 .. The Lord’s Prayer and over population (Not) and shooting from the hip and  a rant about weirdo bastards @ 00H:12m:24s and;

Matthew 6 Wycliffe Bible (WYC)

6 Take heed, that ye do not your rightwiseness before men, to be seen of them, else ye shall have no meed at your Father that is in heavens [else ye shall not have meed of your Father which is in heavens].

2 Therefore when thou doest alms, do not thou trumpet before thee, as hypocrites do in synagogues and streets, that they be worshipped of men[a]; soothly I say to you, they have received their meed.

3 But when thou doest alms, know not thy left hand what thy right hand doeth,

4 that thine alms be in huddles, and thy Father that seeth in huddles, shall requite thee [shall yield to thee].

5 And when ye pray, ye shall not be as hypocrites, that love to pray standing in synagogues and [in] corners of streets, to be seen of men [that they be seen of men]; truly I say to you, they have received their meed.

6 But when thou shalt pray, enter into thy bedchamber, and when the door is shut, pray thy Father in huddles, and thy Father that seeth in huddles, shall yield to thee.

7 But in praying do not ye speak much, as heathen men do, for they guess that they be heard in their much speech.

8 Therefore do not ye be made like to them, for your Father knoweth what is need to you [for your Father knoweth what is needful to you], before that ye ask him.

9 And thus ye shall pray, Our Father that art in heavens, hallowed be thy name;

10 thy kingdom come to; be thy will done in earth as it is in heaven[b];

11 give to us this day our each day’s bread;

12 and forgive to us our debts, as we forgive to our debtors;

13 and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

14 For if ye forgive to men their sins, your heavenly Father shall forgive to you your trespasses.

@ 00H:10m:25s

constitution (n.)
mid-14c., “law, regulation, edict,” from Old French constitucion (12c.) “constitution, establishment,” and directly from Latin constitutionem (nominative constitutio) “act of settling, settled condition, anything arranged or settled upon, regulation, order, ordinance,” from constitut-, past participle stem of constituere (see constitute).
unconscionable (adj.)
1560s, “showing no regard for conscience,” from un- (1) + now rare conscionable “conscientious.” Related: Unconscionably.
conscionable (adj.)
1540s, from conscioned “having a conscience” (from conscience) + -able; obsolete from early 18c. but fossilized in its negative, unconscionable.
scapegoat (n.)
1530, “goat sent into the wilderness on the Day of Atonement, symbolic bearer of the sins of the people,” coined by Tyndale from scape (n.1) + goat to translate Latin caper emissarius, itself a translation in Vulgate of Hebrew ‘azazel (Lev. xvi:8,10,26), which was read as ‘ez ozel “goat that departs,” but which others hold to be the proper name of a devil or demon in Jewish mythology (sometimes identified with Canaanite deity Aziz).

Jerome’s reading also was followed by Martin Luther (der ledige Bock), Symmachus (tragos aperkhomenos), and others (compare French bouc émissaire), but the question of who, or what (or even where) is meant by ‘azazel is a vexed one. The Revised Version (1884) simply restores Azazel. But the old translation has its modern defenders:

Azazel is an active participle or participial noun, derived ultimately from azal (connected with the Arabic word azala, and meaning removed), but immediately from the reduplicate form of that verb, azazal. The reduplication of the consonants of the root in Hebrew and Arabic gives the force of repetition, so that while azal means removed, azalzal means removed by a repetition of acts. Azalzel or azazel, therefore, means one who removes by a series of acts. … The interpretation is founded on sound etymological grounds, it suits the context wherever the word occurs, it is consistent with the remaining ceremonial of the Day of Atonement, and it accords with the otherwise known religious beliefs and symbolical practices of the Israelites. [Rev. F. Meyrick, “Leviticus,” London, 1882]

Meaning “one who is blamed or punished for the mistakes or sins of others” first recorded 1824; the verb is attested from 1943. Related: Scapegoated; scapegoating. For the formation, compare scapegrace, also scape-gallows “one who deserves hanging.”

scapegrace (n.)
1767, from scape (v.) + grace (n.); as if “one who escapes the grace of God.” Possibly influenced by scapegoat.
whore (n.)
1530s spelling alteration (see wh-) of Middle English hore, from Old English hore “prostitute, harlot,” from Proto-Germanic *horaz (fem. *horon-) “one who desires” (cognates: Old Norse hora “adulteress,” Danish hore, Swedish hora, Dutch hoer, Old High German huora “whore;” in Gothic only in the masc. hors “adulterer, fornicator,” also as a verb, horinon “commit adultery”), from PIE *ka- “to like, desire,” a base that has produced words in other languages for “lover” (cognates: Latin carus “dear;” Old Irish cara “friend;” Old Persian kama “desire;” Sanskrit Kama, name of the Hindu god of love, kamah “love, desire,” the first element in Kama Sutra).

Whore itself is perhaps a Germanic euphemism for a word that has not survived. The Old English vowel naturally would have yielded *hoor, which is the pronunciation in some dialects; it might have shifted by influence of Middle English homonym hore “physical filth, slime,” also “moral corruption, sin,” from Old English horh. The wh- form became current 16c. A general term of abuse for an unchaste or lewd woman (without regard to money) from at least c. 1200. Of male prostitutes from 1630s. Whore of Babylon is from Rev. xvii:1, 5, etc. In Middle English with occasional plural forms horen, heoranna.

The word, with its derivatives, is now avoided polite speech; its survival in literature, so as it survives, is due to the fact that it is a favorite word with Shakspere (who uses it, with its derivatives, 99 times) and is common in the authorized English version of the Bible … though the American revisers recommended the substitution of harlot as less gross …. [Century Dictionary]

Some equivalent words in other languages also derive from sources not originally pejorative, such as Bohemian nevestka, diminutive of nevesta “bride;” Dutch deern, German dirne originally “girl, lass, wench;” also perhaps Old French pute, perhaps literally “girl,” fem. of Vulgar Latin *puttus (but perhaps rather from Latin putidus “stinking;” see poontang). Welsh putain “whore” is from French, probably via Middle English. Among other languages, Greek porne “prostitute” is related to pernemi “sell,” with an original notion probably of a female slave sold for prostitution; Latin meretrix is literally “one who earns wages” (source of Irish mertrech, Old English miltestre “whore, prostitute”).

The vulgar Roman word was scortum, literally “skin, hide.” Another term was lupa, literally “she-wolf” (preserved in Spanish loba, Italian lupa, French louve; see wolf (n.)). And of course there was prostituta, literally “placed in front,” thus “publicly exposed,” from the fem. past participle of prostituere (see prostitute (n.)). Another Old Norse term was skækja, which yielded Danish skøge, Swedish sköka; probably from Middle Low German schoke, which is perhaps from schode “foreskin of a horse’s penis,” perhaps with the sense of “skin” (compare Latin scortum) or perhaps via an intermediary sense of “vagina.” Spanish ramera, Portuguese ramiera are from fem. form of ramero “young bird of prey,” literally “little branch,” from ramo “branch.” Breton gast is cognate with Welsh gast “bitch,” of uncertain origin. Compare also strumpet, harlot.

Old Church Slavonic ljubodejica is from ljuby dejati “fornicate,” a compound from ljuby “love” + dejati “put, perform.” Russian bljad “whore” derives from Old Church Slavonic bladinica, from bladu “fornication.” Polish nierządnica is literally “disorderly woman.” Sanskrit vecya is a derivation of veca- “house, dwelling,” especially “house of ill-repute, brothel.” Another term, pumccali, means literally “one who runs after men.” Avestan jahika is literally “woman,” but only of evil creatures; another term is kunairi, from pejorative prefix ku- + nairi “woman.”

whore-monger (n.)
1520s, from whore (n.) + monger (n.). A Petrus Hurmonger is in the 1327 Leicestershire Lay Subsidy Rolls.

Ephesians 6:12Wycliffe Bible (WYC)

12 For why striving is not to us against flesh and blood, but against princes and potentates, against governors of the world of these darknesses, against spiritual things of wickedness, in heavenly things.

con (v.2)
“to swindle,” 1896, from con (adj.). Related: Conned; conning.
con (n.1)
“negation” (mainly in pro and con), 1570s, short for Latin contra “against” (see contra).
con-
word-forming element meaning “together, with,” sometimes merely intensive; the form of com- used in Latin before consonants except -b-, -p-, -l-, -m-, or -r-. In native English formations (such as costar), co- tends to be used where Latin would use con-.
sense (n.)
c. 1400, “faculty of perception,” also “meaning, import, interpretation” (especially of Holy Scripture), from Old French sens “one of the five senses; meaning; wit, understanding” (12c.) and directly from Latin sensus “perception, feeling, undertaking, meaning,” from sentire “perceive, feel, know,” probably a figurative use of a literally meaning “to find one’s way,” or “to go mentally,” from PIE root *sent- “to go” (cognates: Old High German sinnan “to go, travel, strive after, have in mind, perceive,” German Sinn “sense, mind,” Old English sið “way, journey,” Old Irish set, Welsh hynt “way”). Application to any one of the external or outward senses (touch, sight, hearing, etc.) in English first recorded 1520s.

A certain negro tribe has a special word for “see;” but only one general word for “hear,” “touch,” “smell,” and “taste.” It matters little through which sense I realize that in the dark I have blundered into a pig-sty. In French “sentir” means to smell, to touch, and to feel, all together. [Erich M. von Hornbostel, “Die Einheit der Sinne” (“The Unity of the Senses”), 1927]

Meaning “that which is wise” is from c. 1600. Meaning “capacity for perception and appreciation” is from c. 1600 (as in sense of humor, attested by 1783, sense of shame, 1640s).

us (pron.)
Old English us (cognate with Old Saxon, Old Frisian us, Old Norse, Swedish oss, Dutch ons, German uns), accusative and dative plural of we, from PIE *nes- (2), forming oblique cases of the first person plural personal pronoun (cognates: Sanskrit nas, Avestan na, Hittite nash “us;” Greek no “we two;” Latin nos “we, us;” Old Church Slavonic ny “us,” nasu “our;” Old Irish ni, Welsh ni “we, us”). The -n- is preserved in Germanic in Dutch ons, German uns.

I’M MAD AS HELL AND I”M NOT GONNA TAKE THIS ANYMORE

I don’t have to tell you things are bad. Everybody knows things are bad. It’s a depression. Everybody’s out of work or scared of losing their job. The dollar buys a nickel’s worth, banks are going bust, shopkeepers keep a gun under the counter. Punks are running wild in the street and there’s nobody anywhere who seems to know what to do, and there’s no end to it. We know the air is unfit to breathe and our food is unfit to eat, and we sit watching our TV’s while some local newscaster tells us that today we had fifteen homicides and sixty-three violent crimes, as if that’s the way it’s supposed to be. We know things are bad – worse than bad. They’re crazy. It’s like everything everywhere is going crazy, so we don’t go out anymore. We sit in the house, and slowly the world we are living in is getting smaller, and all we say is, ‘Please, at least leave us alone in our living rooms. Let me have my toaster and my TV and my steel-belted radials and I won’t say anything. Just leave us alone.’ Well, I’m not gonna leave you alone. I want you to get mad! I don’t want you to protest. I don’t want you to riot – I don’t want you to write to your congressman because I wouldn’t know what to tell you to write. I don’t know what to do about the depression and the inflation and the Russians and the crime in the street. All I know is that first you’ve got to get mad. You’ve got to say, ‘I’m a HUMAN BEING, God damn it! My life has VALUE!’ So I want you to get up now. I want all of you to get up out of your chairs. I want you to get up right now and go to the window. Open it, and stick your head out, and yell, ‘I’M AS MAD AS HELL, AND I’M NOT GOING TO TAKE THIS ANYMORE!’ I want you to get up right now, sit up, go to your windows, open them and stick your head out and yell – ‘I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore!’ Things have got to change. But first, you’ve gotta get mad!… You’ve got to say, ‘I’m as mad as hell, and I’m not going to take this anymore!’ Then we’ll figure out what to do about the depression and the inflation and the oil crisis. But first get up out of your chairs, open the window, stick your head out, and yell, and say it: “I’M AS MAD AS HELL, AND I’M NOT GOING TO TAKE THIS ANYMORE!”

2014 show 182 july 23

The creation of the World, the creation of the Earth, the LORD God Anthropomorphitism and the infallible Kjv Pick up your Staurós and follow me.

Directly download mp3


Tonight’s topic among others: Having a debate about Genesis and to look at the translators of the King James Bible, and;


genesis n.
Old English Genesis, first book of the Pentateuch, which tells among other things of the creation of the world, from Latin genesis “generation, nativity,” in Late Latin taken as the title of first book of the Old Testament, from Greek genesis “origin, creation, generation,” from gignesthai “to be born,” related to genos “race, birth, descent” (see genus). Greek translators used the word as the title of the biblical book, rendering Hebrew bereshith, literally “in the beginning,” which was the first word of the text, taken as its title. Extended sense of “origin, creation” first recorded in English c. 1600.
Genesis 1 Kjv.
1 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.
2 And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.
3 And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.
4 And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.
5 And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.
6 And God said, Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters.

Genesis 1 Wyc.
1 In the beginning God made of nought heaven and earth.
2 Forsooth the earth was idle and void, and darknesses were on the face of depth; and the Spirit of the Lord was borne on the waters
3 And God said, Light be made, and the light was made.
4 And God saw the light, that it was good, and he parted the light from darknesses;
5 and he called the light, day, and the darknesses, night. And the eventide and the morrowtide was made, one day.
6 And God said, The firmament be made in the midst of waters, and part waters from waters.


anthropomorphite n. mid-15c.; see anthropomorphite + -ist.
The sect of Antropomorfitis, whiche helden that God in his godhede hath hondis and feet and othere suche membris. [Reginald Pecock, “The Repressor of Over Much Blaming of the Clergy,” 1449]
Related: Anthropomorphitism (1660s).


Nimrod
“great hunter,” 1712, a reference to the biblical son of Cush, referred to (Gen. x:8-9) as “a mighty hunter before the Lord.” It came to mean “geek, klutz” by 1983 in teenager slang, for unknown reasons. (Amateur theories include its occasional use in “Bugs Bunny” cartoon episodes featuring rabbit-hunting Elmer Fudd as a foil; its possible ironic use, among hunters, for a clumsy member of their fraternity; or a stereotype of deer hunters by the non-hunting population in the U.S.)


σταυρός staurós, stow-ros’; from the base of G2476; a stake or post (as set upright), i.e. (specially), a pole or cross (as an instrument of capital punishment); figuratively, exposure to death, i.e. self-denial; by implication, the atonement of Christ:—cross.
Strong’s Definitions