2015 show 300 jan 28

Whats the problem? Whats the solution? Your gold and silver is cankered; and the rust of them shall be a witness against you, and shall eat your flesh as it were fire

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Tonight’s topic among others: My Apologies, this post is only the 2nd Hour with Daniel. Republic Broadcasting has no show in the Archives, and Alternative Sources haven’t caught up to the Time Change yet. If you can direct me to a copy of Hour 1 I’d really appreciate it, and;

Clint and Daniel discuss Recognizing and Leaving the Fraud!


fraud n.
mid-14c., “criminal deception” (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin); from Old French fraude “deception, fraud” (13c.), from Latin fraudem (nominative fraus) “a cheating, deceit,” of persons “a cheater, deceiver.” Not in Watkins; perhaps ultimately from PIE *dhreugh- “to deceive” (cognates: Sanskrit dhruti- “deception; error”). Meaning “a fraudulent production, something intended to deceive” is from 1650s. The meaning “impostor, deceiver, pretender; humbug” is attested from 1850. Pious fraud (1560s) is properly “deception practiced for the sake of what is deemed a good purpose;” colloquially used as “person who talks piously but is not pious at heart.”

fraus est celare fraudem. It is fraud to conceal a fraud. Anno: 50 ALR 807.
fraus legis. Fraud of the law; fraud upon the law.


fictio. A fiction.
fiction. In the sense of a fiction of law, a contrived condition or situation; the simulation of a status or condition with the purposeof accomplishing justice, albeit justice reached by devious means, as the fiction of casual ejector whereby the action of ejectment was converted into an action for the determination of title to real estate. 25 Am J2d Eject § 2.
As a literary work, a novel, a portrayal with imaginary characters. In pleading a false averment on the part of the plaintiff which the defendant is not allowed to traverse, the object being to give the court jurisdiction. Snider v Newell, 132 NC 614, 625, 44 SE 354.
fictione juris. Fiction of law. See fiction.
fiction of law. See fiction.
fictitious. Imaginary; not real; counterfeit; false; not genuine. State v Tinnin, 64 Utah 587, 232 P 543, 43 ALR 46, 48.


solution n.
late 14c., “a solving or being solved,” from Old French solucion “division, dissolving; explanation; payment” or directly from Latin solutionem (nominative solutio) “a loosening or unfastening,” noun of action from past participle stem of solvere “to loosen, untie, solve, dissolve” (see solve). Meaning “liquid containing a dissolved substance” is first recorded 1590s.


execution n. v.
The carrying out of some act or course of conduct to its completion. In Criminal Law, the carrying out of a death sentence.


James 5 Kjv
1 Go to now, ye rich men, weep and howl for your miseries that shall come upon you.
2 Your riches are corrupted, and your garments are motheaten.
3 Your gold and silver is cankered; and the rust of them shall be a witness against you, and shall eat your flesh as it were fire. Ye have heaped treasure together for the last days.
4 Behold, the hire of the labourers who have reaped down your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth: and the cries of them which have reaped are entered into the ears of the Lord of sabaoth.
5 Ye have lived in pleasure on the earth, and been wanton; ye have nourished your hearts, as in a day of slaughter.
6 Ye have condemned and killed the just; and he doth not resist you.

2014 show 146 may 20

Having a Baby? Give your hilding the Mark of the Beast, it’s the gift that keeps on giving.. Did I say giving? I meant taking.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Having a Baby? Here’s a Roundtable on how to keep your child from inheriting the Mark of the Beast. You have a Choice! A Free Child, or a Corporate Citizen with a phony name, with loads of Debt! Clint’s Guests Tonight: Freeman Burt, http://www.onlyfreemen.com/ and; pleading the baby act is a slang term used to refer to the act of asserting a person’s infancy as a defense to a contract claim. This plea of infancy is raised to defeat an action upon a contract made when the person was a minor. It is also at times applied to a plea of the statute of Limitations.


debt n. late 13c., dette, from Old French dete, from Latin debitum “thing owed,” neuter past participle of debere “to owe,” originally, “keep something away from someone,” from de- “away” (see de-) + habere “to have” (see habit (n.)). Restored spelling after c. 1400. In Middle English, debt of the body (mid-14c.) was “that which spouses owe to each other, sexual intercourse.”debtor (n.) early 13c., dettur, dettour, from Old French detour, from Latin debitor “a debter,” from past participle stem of debere; see debt. The -b- was restored in later French, and in English c. 1560-c. 1660. The KJV has detter three times, debter three times, debtor twice and debtour once.

fraud n. mid-14c., “criminal deception” (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin); from Old French fraude “deception, fraud” (13c.), from Latin fraudem (nominative fraus) “a cheating, deceit,” of persons “a cheater, deceiver.” Not in Watkins; perhaps ultimately from PIE *dhreugh- “to deceive” (cognates: Sanskrit dhruti- “deception; error”). Meaning “a fraudulent production, something intended to deceive” is from 1650s. The meaning “impostor, deceiver, pretender; humbug” is attested from 1850. Pious fraud (1560s) is properly “deception practiced for the sake of what is deemed a good purpose;” colloquially used as “person who talks piously but is not pious at heart.”