2014 show 168 july 02

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Tonight’s topic among others: Who is guiding the ship of Law? and question via phone and;

diligence (n.)
mid-14c., from Old French diligence “attention, care; haste, speed,” from Latin diligentia “attentiveness, carefulness,” from diligentem (nominative diligens) “attentive, assiduous, careful,” originally present participle of diligere “single out, value highly, esteem, prize, love; aspire to, be content with, appreciate,” originally “to pick out, select,” from dis- “apart” (see dis-) + legere “choose, gather” (see lecture (n.)).

Sense evolved from “love” through “attentiveness” to “carefulness” to “steady effort.” From the secondary French sense comes the old useage of diligence for “public stage coach” (1742; dilly for short), from a French shortening of carrosse de diligence.

truth (n.)
Old English triewð (West Saxon), treowð (Mercian) “faith, faithfulness, fidelity, loyalty; veracity, quality of being true; pledge, covenant,” from triewe, treowe “faithful” (see true (adj.)), with Proto-Germanic abstract noun suffix *-itho (see -th (2)).
standing (n.)
late 14c., verbal noun from stand (v.). In the sense of “rank, status,” it is first recorded 1570s. Sense of “state of having existed for some time” is 1650s. Legal sense is first recorded 1924. Sports sense is from 1881. To be in good standing is from 1789. Standing room is from 1788.
licence (n.)
mid-14c., “liberty (to do something), leave,” from Old French licence “freedom, liberty, power, possibility; permission,” (12c.), from Latin licentia “freedom, liberty, license,” from licentem (nominative licens), present participle of licere “to be allowed, be lawful,” from PIE root *leik- “to offer, bargain” (cognates: Lettish likstu “I come to terms”). Meaning “formal (usually written) permission from authority to do something” (marry, hunt, drive, etc.) is first attested early 15c. Meaning “excessive liberty, disregard of propriety” is from mid-15c. There have been attempts to confine license to verbal use and licence to noun use (compare advise/advice, devise/device.
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