2014 show 132 april 30

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Tonight’s topic among others: Daniel has problems calling in, intercourse and seduction; word of the day intercourse; and investigate every word and;


intercourse n. mid-15c., “communication to and fro,” (“In early use exclusively with reference to trade” [OED]), from Old French entrecors “exchange, commerce, communication” (12c., Modern French entrecours), from Late Latin intercursus “a running between, intervention,” in Medieval Latin “intercommunication,” from intercursus, past participle of intercurrere “to run between, intervene, mediate,” from Latin inter- “between” (see inter-) +currere “to run” (see current (adj.)).


seduction n. 1520s, from Middle French séduction, from Latin seductionem (nominative seductio), noun of action from past participle stem of seducere (see seduce). Originally with reference to actions or beliefs; sexual sense is from 1769, originally always with women as the objects. Earlier appearance of the word in Middle English with a sense “treason, treachery” probably is a confusion with sedition, which confusion also is found in Old French seducion “treason, betrayal.”


civil adj. late 14c., “relating to civil law or life; pertaining to the internal affairs of a state,” from Old French civil “civil, relating to civil law” (13c.) and directly from Latin civilis “relating to a citizen, relating to public life, befitting a citizen,” hence by extension “popular, affable, courteous;” alternative adjectival derivation of civis “townsman” (see city).


idiot n. early 14c., “person so mentally deficient as to be incapable of ordinary reasoning;” also in Middle English “simple man, uneducated person, layman” (late 14c.), from Old French idiote “uneducated or ignorant person” (12c.), from Latin idiota “ordinary person, layman; outsider,” in Late Latin “uneducated or ignorant person,” from Greek idiotes “layman, person lacking professional skill” (opposed to writer, soldier, skilled workman), literally “private person” (as opposed to one taking part in public affairs), used patronizingly for “ignorant person,” from idios “one’s own” (see idiom).


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plato’s_five_regimes#Timocracy

timocracy n. 1580s, from Middle French tymocracie, from Medieval Latin timocratia (13c.), from Greek timokratia, from time “honor, worth” (related to tiein “to place a value on, to honor,” from PIE *kwi-ma-, suffixed form of root *kweie- (1) “to value, honor”) + -kratia “rule” (see -cracy). In Plato’s philosophy, a form of government in which ambition for honor and glory motivates the rulers (as in Sparta). In Aristotle, a form of government in which political power is in direct proportion to property ownership. Related: Timocratic; timocratical.