2014 show 276 dec 17

fraus est celare fraudem, Tell me, ye that desire to be under the law, do ye not hear the law? Inside the court of the unknown yield.

Advertisements

Directly download mp3


Tonight’s topic among others: the Word FRAUD! Lie means to exist, or to subsist in the Fiction! We Live in A Lie! Lets talk about fraud and;


Galatians 3 Kjv
1 O foolish Galatians, who hath bewitched you, that ye should not obey the truth, before whose eyes Jesus Christ hath been evidently set forth, crucified among you?


E. W. Bullinger Known for The Companion Bible Wiki


fore
Middle English for-, fore-, from Old English fore-, often for- or foran-, from fore (adv. & prep.), which was used as a prefix in Old English as in other Germanic languages with a sense of “before in time, rank, position,” etc., or designating the front part or earliest time.
given adj.
late 14c., “allotted, predestined,” past participle adjective from give (v.). From 1560s as “admitted, supposed, allowed as a supposition.” From late 14c. as “disposed, addicted.” Middle English also had a noun give, yeve “that which is given or offered freely.” The modern noun sense of “what is given, known facts” is from 1879. Given name (1827) so called because given at baptism.
noun n.
late 14c., from Anglo-French noun “name, noun,” from Old French nom, non (Modern French nom), from Latin nomen “name, noun” (see name (n.)). Old English used name to mean “noun.” Related: Nounal.


fraud n.
mid-14c., “criminal deception” (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin); from Old French fraude “deception, fraud” (13c.), from Latin fraudem (nominative fraus) “a cheating, deceit,” of persons “a cheater, deceiver.” Not in Watkins; perhaps ultimately from PIE *dhreugh- “to deceive” (cognates: Sanskrit dhruti- “deception; error”). Meaning “a fraudulent production, something intended to deceive” is from 1650s. The meaning “impostor, deceiver, pretender; humbug” is attested from 1850. Pious fraud (1560s) is properly “deception practiced for the sake of what is deemed a good purpose;” colloquially used as “person who talks piously but is not pious at heart.”

fraus est celare fraudem. It is fraud to conceal a fraud. Anno: 50 ALR 807.
fraus legis. Fraud of the law; fraud upon the law.


fictio. A fiction.
fiction. In the sense of a fiction of law, a contrived condition or situation; the simulation of a status or condition with the purposeof accomplishing justice, albeit justice reached by devious means, as the fiction of casual ejector whereby the action of ejectment was converted into an action for the determination of title to real estate. 25 Am J2d Eject § 2.
As a literary work, a novel, a portrayal with imaginary characters. In pleading a false averment on the part of the plaintiff
which the defendant is not allowed to traverse, the object being to give the court jurisdiction. Snider v Newell, 132 NC 614,
625, 44 SE 354
.
fictione juris. Fiction of law. See fiction.
fiction of law. See fiction.
fictitious. Imaginary; not real; counterfeit; false; not genuine. State v Tinnin, 64 Utah 587, 232 P 543, 43 ALR 46, 48.


passover
The Passover in the Holy Family: Gathering Bitter Herbs Watercolor 1855-56 16 x 17inches

Easter Vs Passover

Nelson’s Bible Dictionary
“Easter was originally a pagan festival honoring Eostre, a Teutonic (Germanic) goddess of light and spring. At the time of the vernal equinox (the day in the spring when the sun crosses the equator and day and night are of equal length), sacrifices were offered in her honor. As early as the eighth century, the name was used to designate the annual Christian celebration of the resurrection of Chr-st. The only appearance of the word Easter (Kjv) is a mistranslation of pascha, the ordinary Greek word for ‘Passover’ (Acts 12:4).”
passover Vs easter

Happy-Easter-Rabbit-Egg-Pics
The psychedelic mushroom trip we call Easter.
Christian leaders attempt to fix global date for Easter
The archbishop of Canterbury has announced he is engaged in an ambitious plan to solve one of the oldest disagreements in Christianity – one dating back more than 1,600 years.


perversion n.
late 14c., “action of turning aside from truth, corruption, distortion” (originally of religious beliefs), from Latin perversionem (nominative perversio) “a turning about,” noun of action from past participle stem of pervertere (see pervert (v.)). Psychological sense of “disorder of sexual behavior in which satisfaction is sought through channels other than those of normal heterosexual intercourse” is from 1892, originally including homosexuality.

Perversions are defined as unnatural acts, acts contrary to nature, bestial, abominable, and detestable. Such laws are interpretable only in accordance with the ancient tradition of the English common law which … is committed to the doctrine that no sexual activity is justifiable unless its objective is procreation. [A.C. Kinsey, et.al., “Sexual Behavior in the Human Male,” 1948]
per
word-forming element meaning “through, throughout; thoroughly; entirely, utterly,” from Latin preposition per (see per (prep.)).
version n.
1580s, “a translation,” from Middle French version, from Medieval Latin versionem (nominative versio) “a turning, a translation,” from past participle stem of Latin vertere “to turn, change, alter, translate” (see versus). Also with a Middle English sense of “destruction;” the meaning “particular form of a description” is first attested 1788.


Jonah 1 Kjv
16 And the men dreaded the Lord with great dread, and offered hosts to the Lord, and vowed avows.
17 And the Lord made ready a great fish, that he should swallow Jonah; and Jonah was in the womb of the fish three days and three nights.
Jonah 2 Kjv
2 Then Jonah prayed unto the Lord his God out of the fish’s belly,
2 And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the Lord, and he heard me; out of the belly of hell cried I, and thou heardest my voice.
3 For thou hadst cast me into the deep, in the midst of the seas; and the floods compassed me about: all thy billows and thy waves passed over me.


defender n.
c. 1300 (early 13c. as a surname), via Anglo-French, from Old French defendeor, agent noun from defendre (see defend). The Latin word in this sense was defensor.
defend v.
mid-13c., from Old French defendre (12c.) “defend, resist,” and directly from Latin defendere “ward off, protect, guard, allege in defense,” from de- “from, away” (see de-) + -fendere “to strike, push,” from PIE root *gwhen- “to strike, kill” (see bane). In the Mercian hymns, Latin defendet is glossed by Old English gescildeð. Related: Defended; defending.

Fidei defensorDefender of the Faith” has been one of the subsidiary titles of the English and later British monarchs since it was granted on 11 October, 1521 by Pope Leo X to King Henry VIII of England.

faith n.
mid-13c., faith, feith, fei, fai “faithfulness to a trust or promise; loyalty to a person; honesty, truthfulness,” from Anglo-French and Old French feid, foi “faith, belief, trust, confidence; pledge” (11c.), from Latin fides “trust, faith, confidence, reliance, credence, belief,” from root of fidere “to trust,” from PIE root *bheidh- “to trust” (source also of Greek pistis “faith, confidence, honesty;” see bid). For sense evolution, see belief. Accomodated to other English abstract nouns in -th (truth, health, etc.).

From early 14c. as “assent of the mind to the truth of a statement for which there is incomplete evidence,” especially “belief in religious matters” (matched with hope and charity). Since mid-14c. in reference to the Christian church or religion; from late 14c. in reference to any religious persuasion.

And faith is neither the submission of the reason, nor is it the acceptance, simply and absolutely upon testimony, of what reason cannot reach. Faith is: the being able to cleave to a power of goodness appealing to our higher and real self, not to our lower and apparent self. Matthew Arnold, “Literature Dogma,” 1873

From late 14c. as “confidence in a person or thing with reference to truthfulness or reliability,” also “fidelity of one spouse to another.” Also in Middle English “a sworn oath,” hence its frequent use in Middle English oaths and asseverations (par ma fay, mid-13c.; bi my fay, c. 1300).

titular adj.
1590s, from or based on Middle French titulaire (16c.), from Latin titulus (see title) + -ar. Related: Titulary.

Sales of Slaves.
Slave dealers usually offered their wares at public auction sales (Fig. 29). These were under the supervision of the aediles, who appointed the place and made rules and regulations to govern them. A tax was imposed on imported slaves and they were offered for sale with their feet whitened with chalk; those from the east had also their ears bored, a common sign of slavery among oriental peoples. As bids were asked for each slave he was made to mount a stone or platform, corresponding to the “block” familiar to the readers of our own history.
From his neck hung a scroll (titulus), setting forth his character and serving as a warrant for the purchaser. If the slave had defects not made known in this warrant the vendor was bound to take him back within six months or make good the loss to the buyer.
The chief items in the titulus were the age and nationality of the slave, and his freedom from such common defects as chronic ill-health, especially epilepsy, and tendencies to thievery, running away, and suicide. In spite of the guarantee the purchaser took care to examine the slaves as closely as possible.
For this reason they were commonly stripped, made to move around, handled freely by the purchaser, and even examined by physicians. If no warrant was given by the dealer, a cap (pilleus) was put on the slave’s head at the time of the sale and the purchaser took all risks. The dealer might also offer the slaves at private sale, and this was the rule in the case of all of unusual value and especially of marked personal beauty…
The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Private Life of the Romans, by Harold Whetstone Johnston. The Private Life of the Romans


designation n.
late 14c., “action of pointing out,” from Old French designacion or directly from Latin designationem (nominative designatio) “a marking out, specification,” noun of action from past participle stem of designare (see design (v.)). Meaning “descriptive name” is from 1824.
design v.
1540s, from Latin designare “mark out, devise, choose, designate, appoint,” from de- “out” (see de-) + signare “to mark,” from signum “a mark, sign” (see sign (n.)). Originally in English with the meaning now attached to designate; many modern uses of design are metaphoric extensions. Related: Designed; designing.
design n.
1580s, from Middle French desseign “purpose, project, design,” from Italian disegno, from disegnare “to mark out,” from Latin designare “to mark out” (see design (v.)).
nation n.
c. 1300, from Old French nacion “birth, rank; descendants, relatives; country, homeland” (12c.) and directly from Latin nationem (nominative natio) “birth, origin; breed, stock, kind, species; race of people, tribe,” literally “that which has been born,” from natus, past participle of nasci “be born” (Old Latin gnasci; see genus). Political sense has gradually predominated, but earliest English examples inclined toward the racial meaning “large group of people with common ancestry.” Older sense preserved in application to North American Indian peoples (1640s). Nation-building first attested 1907 (implied in nation-builder).
de
active word-forming element in English and in many words inherited from French and Latin, from Latin de “down, down from, from, off; concerning” (see de), also used as a prefix in Latin usually meaning “down, off, away, from among, down from,” but also “down to the bottom, totally” hence “completely” (intensive or completive), which is its sense in many English words. As a Latin prefix it also had the function of undoing or reversing a verb’s action, and hence it came to be used as a pure privative — “not, do the opposite of, undo” — which is its primary function as a living prefix in English, as in defrost (1895), defuse (1943), etc. Compare also dis-.
SIG,
a Saxon word signifying victory. is used in names, as in Sigbert, bright victory. In answers to the Greek vix in Nicander, and the Latin vic, in Victorinus.
sig Strong’s No.:H7873 pursuing
Transliteration: ώîyg
Pronunciation: seeg
Definition: From H7734; a withdrawl (into a private place): – pursuing.
Occurences: pursuing (1)
nay
word of negation, late 12c., from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse nei, compound of ne “not” (see un-) + ei “ever” (see aye.
, ; adv.No, not; non.
Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional na,
na, conj. Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional (north-west.) 19– na. Etymology : Perhaps formed within English, by compounding. Etymons: English na , no conj.
tau (Τ τ) :
nineteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, from Hebrew taw, last letter of the Hebrew alphabet, literally “sign, mark.”
In ancient times, Tau was used as a symbol for life and/or resurrection, whereas the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, theta, was considered the symbol of death.
In Biblical times, the Taw was put on men to distinguish those who lamented sin, although newer versions of the Bible have replaced the ancient term “Taw” with “mark” (Ezekiel 9:4) or “signature” (Job 31:35).

The sign of the cross. The mark of Cain… The image of containment or suppression Letter Perfect p301. David Sacks. 2003 – ISBN 0-7679-1173-3

ion
word-forming element attached to verbs, making nouns of state, condition, or action, from French -ion or directly from Latin –ionem (nominative -io, genitive -ionis), common suffix forming abstract nouns from verbs.
In Latin found extremely commonly in formations from verbs, typically on the past participial or supine stem (in -t- , -s- , -x- ), e.g. damnātiō damnation n.
Formations within English (chiefly on verbs ultimately of Latin origin) become common from the 16th cent.


addition n.
late 14c., “action of adding numbers;” c. 1400, “that which is added,” from Old French adition “increase, augmentation” (13c.), from Latin additionem (nominative additio) “an adding to, addition,” noun of action from past participle stem of addere (see add). Phrase in addition to “also” is from 1680s.
additional adj.
1640s, from addition + -al (1). Related: Additionally.


dummy n.
1590s, “mute person,” from dumb (adj.) + -y (3). Extended by 1845 to “figure representing a person.” Used in card games (originally whist) since 1736. Meaning “dolt, blockhead” is from 1796.


Proverbs 11:15 Kjv
15 He that is surety for a stranger shall smart for it: and he that hateth suretiship is sure.


gentilitious adj.
1. Characteristic of a ‘gentile’; pagan. Obs.—1
2. Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of, a nation; national. (= gentilitial adj. 1.)
a. Of or pertaining to a gens or family. (= gentilitial adj. 2.)


Frescos+of+the+Brancacci+Chapel+in+Santa+Maria+del+Carmine+in+Florence+scenes-1600x1200-15094
Expulsion from the Garden of Eden. Masaccio. 1425.

circumcised adj.
a. Having the prepuce cut off; that has undergone circumcision. (Allusively used for ‘Jewish’ or ‘Muslim’.)
b. fig. Spiritually chastened or purified.
2. Cut or shorn round. Obs.
3. Cut short, curtailed, circumscribed. Obs.
circumcise n.
mid-13c., “to cut off the foreskin,” from Old French circoncisier “circumcise” (12c., Modern French circoncire), from Latin circumcisus, past participle of circumcidere “to cut round, to cut trim, to cut off” (see circumcision). Related: Circumcised; circumcising.
skin v.
late 14c., “to remove the skin from” (originally of circumcision), from skin (n.). As “to have (a particular kind of) skin” from c. 1400. In 19c. U.S. colloquial use, “to strip, fleece, plunder;” hence skin-game, one in which one player has no chance against the others (as with a stacked deck), the type of con game played in a skin-house. Skin the cat in gymnastics is from 1845. Related: Skinned; skinning.
fleecev.
1530s in the literal sense of “to strip (a sheep) of fleece,” from fleece (n.). From 1570s in the figurative meaning “to cheat, swindle, strip of money.” Related: Fleeced; fleecer; fleecing.

Genesis 3 Kjv
21 Unto Adam also and to his wife did the Lord God make coats of skins, and clothed them.


cognomen n.
1809, from Latin com- “with” (see co-) + (g)nomen “name” (see name (n.)). Third or family name of a Roman citizen (Caius Julius Cæsar).
cognate adj.
1640s, from Latin cognatus “of common descent,” from com- “together” (see co-) + gnatus, past participle of gnasci, older form of nasci “to be born” (see genus). Words that are cognates are cousins, not siblings. As a noun, from 1754.
cog v. Ods.
From contextual evidence it would seem that ‘cogging’ generally designated some sleight of hand, made use of to control the falling of a die; occasionally it may mean the substitution of a false die for the true one. The notion that it meant ‘to load the dice’ appears to be a mistake of modern dictionaries, which has, however, strongly influenced the use of the word by modern novelists…


code n.
b. A systematic collection or digest of the laws of a country, or of those relating to a particular subject.
a. A system or collection of rules or regulations on any subject.
b. Telegr. A system of words arbitrarily used for other words or for phrases, to secure brevity and secrecy; also attrib., as in code telegram, code word.


diction n.
1540s, “a word;” 1580s, “expression of ideas in words,” from Late Latin dictionem (nominative dictio) “a saying, expression, word,” noun of action from dic-, past participle stem of Latin dicere “speak, tell, say” (source of French dire “to say”), related to dicare “proclaim, dedicate,” from PIE root *deik- “to point out” (cognates: Sanskrit dic- “point out, show,” Greek deiknynai “to show, to prove,” Latin digitus “finger,” Old High German zeigon, German zeigen “to show,” Old English teon “to accuse,” tæcan “to teach”).

Another cognate is Greek dike “custom, usage,” and, via the notion of “right as dependent on custom,” “law, a right; a judgment; a lawsuit, court case, trial; penalty awarded by a judge.”


Forgery bond
Corporate Suretyship .pdf by G. W. Crist, Jr. McGraw-Hill, 1939.
https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/crist_forgery_bonds.jpg


A right royal Birth certificate
https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/royal_birth_certif.jpg?w=840
The Royals themselves may not whats going on with this document. But the Registra sure as shit did.

2014 show 262 nov 26

Is the Bible not a compendium of Ancient Knowledge? Bread of deceit is sweet to a man, Confessions Of A Former Truther Government is your god. Volunteerism.

Directly download mp3


Tonight’s topic among others: Everyone can benefit from the Bible! Many sections of the Bible, originated long before Christ! The Bible is not a Plagiarism, it is a compendium of Ancient Knowledge! Voluntary Societies – We already Live in One!


Revelation 13:17 Kjb
17 And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.

beast. Any animal with four feet; a brutish, vile, or lecherous person.

monster. A plant or creature terribly deformed. A human-being by birth, but in some part resembling a lower animal.
A monster . . . hath no inheritable blood, and cannot be heir to any land, albeit it be brought forth in marriage; but,
although it hath deformity in any part of its body, yet if it hath human shape, it may be heir
.” 2 Bl Comm 246.
BALLENTINE’S LAW DICTIONARY – THIRD EDITION


signature n.
1530s, a kind of document in Scottish law, from Middle French signature (16c.) or directly from Medieval Latin signatura “signature, a rescript,” in classical Latin “the matrix of a seal,” from signatus, past participle of signare “to mark with a stamp, sign” (see sign n.).
Meaning “one’s own name written in one’s own hand” is from 1570s, replacing sign-manual (early 15c.) in this sense. Musical sense of “signs placed it the beginning of a staff to indicate the key and rhythm” is from 1806. Meaning “a distinguishing mark of any kind” is from 1620s
SIG n.
a Saxon word signifying victory. is used in names, as in Sigbert, bright victory. In answers to the Greek vix in Nicander, and the Latin vic, in Victorinus.
sig Strong’s No.:H7873 pursuing
Transliteration: ώîyg
Pronunciation: seeg
Definition: From H7734; a withdrawl (into a private place): – pursuing.
Occurences: pursuing (1)

1 Kings 18:27 Kjv. And it came to pass at noon, that Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud: for he is a god; either he is talking, or he is pursuing, or he is in a journey, or peradventure he sleepeth, and must be awaked.

pursuing(Webster’s 1828 Dictionary)
pursuing ppr. Following; chasing; hastening after to overtake; prosecuting; proceeding in; continuing.

Gary Rendsburg’s paper (The Mock of Baal in 1 Kings 18:27) The Catholic Biblical Quarterly 1988. Vol 50, No.3

“In short there is good reason to conclude that both elements in the hendiadys, siah and sig, refer to excretion…”

nay
word of negation, late 12c., from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse nei, compound of ne “not” (see un-) + ei “ever” (see aye.
, ; adv.No, not; non.
Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional na,
na, conj. Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional (north-west.) 19– na. Etymology : Perhaps formed within English, by compounding. Etymons: English na , no conj.
tau (Τ τ) :
nineteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, from Hebrew taw, last letter of the Hebrew alphabet, literally “sign, mark.”
In ancient times, Tau was used as a symbol for life and/or resurrection, whereas the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, theta, was considered the symbol of death.
In Biblical times, the Taw was put on men to distinguish those who lamented sin, although newer versions of the Bible have replaced the ancient term “Taw” with “mark” (Ezekiel 9:4) or “signature” (Job 31:35).

The sign of the cross. The mark of Cain… The image of containment or suppression
Letter Perfect p301.
David Sacks. 2003 ISBN 0-7679-1173-3

ur, (n). An inarticulate sound, uttered instead of a word that the speaker is unable to remember or bring out.
úre gen. pl. of personal pronoun of first person. Of us Adam can yfel and gód, swá swá úre sum (quasi unus ex nobis ), Gen. 3, 22.
úre adj. pronoun. I. our
ure, n.1
Etymology: Anglo-Norman *eure, = Old French uevre , euvre , evre (13th cent.; French œuvre ) Latin opera opera n.2(Show Less)
I. in ure:
a. In or into use, practice, or performance. Often with vbs., as bring, come, have, and esp. put (freq. c1510–1630). Also rarely with into.
b. With dependent infinitive.
c. With reference to statutes, etc.: In or into effect, force, or operation. Chiefly with vbs., esp. put.
d. In remembrance or recollection. Only to have..in ure.
e. In or into a state of prevalence or existence. Chiefly with vbs., as come, draw, put.
ure, suffix2
Etymology: French -ure (in e.g. dasyure dasyure n.) and its etymon scientific Latin -urus (also -ura: see note) : ancient Greek οὐρά tail (see uro- comb. form2).
Scientific Latin -urus is found in genus names from 1758 (e.g. Trichiurus trichiure n. at trichiurid n. Derivatives) and -ura from 1764 (e.g. Xiphosura xiphosure n. at xiphosuran adj. and n. Derivatives).
Re
“with reference to,” used from c. 1700 in legalese, from Latin (in) re “in the matter of,” from ablative case of res “matter, thing.” Its use is execrated by Fowler in three different sections of “Modern English Usage.”
Ra
Ra or Re is the ancient Egyptian sun god. By the Fifth Dynasty in the 25th & 24th centuries, he had become a major god in ancient Egyptian religion, identified primarily with the noon sun.
re
word-forming element meaning “back to the original place; again, anew, once more,” also with a sense of “undoing,” c. 1200, from Old French and directly from Latin re- “again, back, anew, against,” “Latin combining form conceivably from Indo-European *wret-, metathetical variant of *wert- “to turn” [Watkins]. Often merely intensive, and in many of the older borrowings from French and Latin the precise sense of re- is lost in secondary senses or weakened beyond recognition. OED writes that it is “impossible to attempt a complete record of all the forms resulting from its use,” and adds that “The number of these is practically infinite ….” The Latin prefix became red- before vowels and h-, as in redact, redeem, redolent, redundant.

nature n.
late 13c., “restorative powers of the body, bodily processes; powers of growth;” from Old French nature “nature, being, principle of life; character, essence,” from Latin natura “course of things; natural character, constitution, quality; the universe,” literally “birth,” from natus “born,” past participle of nasci “to be born,” from PIE *gene- “to give birth, beget” (see genus).

Nature Greek: phusis – Strong’s No.:g5449
from phuo, “to bring forth, produce,” signifies
(a) “the nature” (i.e., the natural powers of constitution) of a person or thing, Eph 2:3; Jam 3:7 (“kind”); 2Pe 1:4;
(b) “origin, birth,” Rom 2:27, one who by birth is a Gentile, uncircumcised, in contrast to one who, though circumcised, has become spiritually uncircumcised by his iniquity; Gal 2:15;
(c) “the regular law or order of nature,” Rom 1:26, against “nature” (para, “against”); Rom 2:14, adverbially, “by nature” (for Rom 11:21, 24, see NATURAL, Note); 1Cr 11:14; Gal 4:8, “by nature (are no gods),” here “nature” is the emphatic word, and the phrase includes demons, men regarded as deified, and idols; these are gods only in name (the negative, me, denies not simply that they were gods, but the possibility that they could be).


evil adj.
Old English yfel (Kentish evel) “bad, vicious, ill, wicked,” from Proto-Germanic ubilaz (cognates: Old Saxon ubil, Old Frisian and Middle Dutch evel, Dutch euvel, Old High German ubil, German übel, Gothic ubils), from PIE *upelo-, from root *wap- “bad, evil” (cognates: Hittite huwapp- “evil”).

In Old English and other older Germanic languages other than Scandinavian, “this word is the most comprehensive adjectival expression of disapproval, dislike or disparagement” [OED]. Evil was the word the Anglo-Saxons used where we would use bad, cruel, unskillful, defective (adj.), or harm n., crime, misfortune, disease n.. In Middle English, bad took the wider range of senses and evil began to focus on moral badness. Both words have good as their opposite. Evil-favored (1520s) meant “ugly.” Evilchild is attested as an English surname from 13c.

The adverb is Old English yfele, originally of words or speech. Also as a noun in Old English,
“what is bad; sin, wickedness; anything that causes injury, morally or physically.”

Especially of a malady or disease from c. 1200. The meaning “extreme moral wickedness” was one of the senses of the Old English noun, but it did not become established as the main sense of the modern word until 18c. As a noun, Middle English also had evilty. Related: Evilly. Evil eye (Latin oculus malus) was Old English eage yfel. The jocular notion of an evil twin as an excuse for regrettable deeds is by 1986, American English, from an old motif in mythology.


god n.
Old English god “supreme being, deity; the Christian God; image of a god; godlike person,” from Proto-Germanic guthan (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Dutch god, Old High German got, German Gott, Old Norse guð, Gothic guþ), from PIE ghut– “that which is invoked” (cognates: Old Church Slavonic zovo “to call,” Sanskrit huta- “invoked,” an epithet of Indra), from root *gheu(e)- “to call, invoke.”

I want my lawyer, my tailor, my servants, even my wife to believe in God, because it means that I shall be cheated and robbed and cuckolded less often. … If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him. [Voltaire]

  1. Any person or thing exalted too much in estimation, or deified and honored as the chief good.

graven adj.
“sculpted, carved,” late 14c., past participle adjective from grave (v.) + -en (1).

Exodus 20:4 Kjb
Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth.


similitude n.
late 14c., from Old French similitude “similarity, relationship, comparison” (13c.) and directly from Latin similitudinem (nominative similitudo) “likeness, resemblance,” from similis “like” (see similar).
verisimilitude n.
“appearance of truth or reality, likelihood,” c. 1600, from French verisimilitude (1540s), from Latin verisimilitudo “likeness to truth,” from veri, genitive of verum, neuter of verus “true” (see very) + similis “like, similar” (see similar). Related: Verisimilar.

image n.
c. 1200, “piece of statuary; artificial representation that looks like a person or thing,” from Old French image “image, likeness; figure, drawing, portrait; reflection; statue,” earlier imagene (11c.), from Latin imaginem (nominative imago) “copy, imitation, likeness; statue, picture,” also “phantom, ghost, apparition,” figuratively “idea, appearance,” from stem of imitari “to copy, imitate” (see imitation).

To þe ymage of god he made hym [Gen. i:27, Wycliffite Bible, early version, 1382]

Meaning “reflection in a mirror” is early 14c. The mental sense was in Latin, and appears in English late 14c. Sense of “public impression” is attested in isolated cases from 1908 but not in common use until its rise in the jargon of advertising and public relations, c. 1958.


Deuteronomy 4:16 Kjb
Lest ye corrupt yourselves, and make you a graven image, the similitude of any figure, the likeness of male or female,


wizard of id


coincide v.
1705, “be identical in substance or nature,” but from 1640s as a verb in English in Latin form, “occupy the same space, agree in position,” from Medieval Latin coincidere (used in astrology), literally “to fall upon together,” from Latin com- “together” (see co-) + incidere “to fall upon” (in- “upon” + cadere “to fall;” see case (n.1)). From 1809 as “occur at the same time.” Related: Coincided; coinciding.
cide
word-forming element meaning “killer,” from French -cide, from Latin -cida “cutter, killer, slayer,” from -cidere, comb. form of caedere “to strike down, chop, beat, hew, fell, slay,” from PIE kae-id-, from root *(s)k(h)ai- “to strike” (Pokorny, not in Watkins; cognates: Sanskrit skhidati “beats, tears,” Lithuanian kaisti “shave,” German heien “beat”). For Latin vowel change, see acquisition. The element also can represent “killing,” from French –cide*, from Latin -cidium “a cutting, a killing.”


ism n.
“distinctive doctrine, theory, or practice,” 1670s, the suffix -ism used as an independent word, chiefly disparagingly. Related: Ismatical. By the same path, ist is from 1811.
ism
word-forming element making nouns implying a practice, system, doctrine, etc., from French -isme or directly from Latin -isma, -ismus (source also of Italian, Spanish -ismo, Dutch, German -ismus), from Greek -ismos, noun ending signifying the practice or teaching of a thing, from the stem of verbs in -izein, a verb-forming element denoting the doing of the noun or adjective to which it is attached. For distinction of use, see -ity. The related Greek suffix -isma(t)- affects some forms.


Confessions Of A Former Truther


Proverbs 20:17 Kjb
Bread of deceit is sweet to a man; but afterwards his mouth shall be filled with gravel.

2014 show 239 oct 22

Hyper empathy during Hyper modernity, evil in high places. Caesar is still an Arsehole. Bouvier gets Animalification and many that are first shall be last; and the last first.

Directly download mp3


Tonight’s topic among others: Initially Daniel apologizes for last weeks Hyper Empathetic Outbursts, about those in Power, who Abuse their Offices on a Regular Basis! and a license to get into Heaven and;

Romans 2:11 Kjv
11 For there is no respect of persons with God.
Job 32:21 Kjv
21 Let me not, I pray you, accept any man’s person, neither let me give flattering titles unto man.
Philippians 4:11 Kjv
11 Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content.
James 2:9 Kjv
09 But if ye have respect to persons, ye commit sin, and are convinced of the law as transgressors.
Proverbs 28:21 Kjv
21 To have respect of persons is not good: for for a piece of bread that man will transgress.
Proverbs 24:23 Kjv
23 These things also belong to the wise. It is not good to have respect of persons in judgment.
Proverbs 18:5 Kjv
05 It is not good to accept the person of the wicked, to overthrow the righteous in judgment
Hebrews 12:16 Kjv
16 Lest there be any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for one morsel of meat sold his birthright.
1 Corinthians 5:13 Kjv
13 But them that are without God judgeth. Therefore put away from among yourselves that wicked person.
Leviticus 19:15 Kjv
5 Ye shall do no unrighteousness in judgment: thou shalt not respect the person of the poor, nor honor the person of the mighty: but in righteousness shalt thou judge thy neighbour.
Psalm 138:6 Kjv
6 Though the Lord be high, yet hath he respect unto the lowly: but the proud he knoweth afar off.
Ephesians 6:9 Kjv
9 And, ye masters, do the same things unto them, forbearing threatening: knowing that your Master also is in heaven; neither is there respect of persons with him.
James 2:1 Kjv
2 My brethren, have not the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord of glory, with respect of persons.
Psalm 49:10 Kjv
10 For he seeth that wise men die, likewise the fool and the brutish person perish, and leave their wealth to others.


personate v. rare
1. pretend to be someone you are not; sometimes with fraudulent intentions
She posed as the Czar’s daughter *
2. attribute human qualities to something
*The Greeks personated their gods ridiculous


consent n.
c. 1300, “approval,” also “agreement in sentiment, harmony,” from Old French consente, from consentir (see consent v.). Age of consent is attested from 1809.

consent v.
early 13c., from Old French consentir (12c.) “agree, comply,” from Latin consentire “feel together,” from com- “with” (see com-) + sentire “to feel” (see sense n.). “Feeling together,” hence, “agreeing, giving permission,” apparently a sense evolution that took place in French before the word reached English. Related: Consented; consenting.


implied consent
n. consent when surrounding circumstances exist which would lead a reasonable person to believe that this consent had been given, although no direct, express or explicit words of agreement had been uttered. Examples: a) a “contract” based on the fact that one person has been doing a particular thing and the other person expects him/her to continue; b) the defense in a “date rape” case in which there is a claim of assumed consent due to absence of protest or a belief that “no” really meant “yes,” “maybe” or “later.”


THE THREE STOOGES: Disorder in the Court (1936) (Remastered) (HD 1080p) [Youtube]

union_jack_gate.
Union Jack Gate is Close to the Defense

Moe & Larry play Noughts & Crosses on the Prosecutions Back with Chalk – (The game’s grid markings have been found chalked all over Rome) No matter who wins or looses the Lawyer always plays both sides.
Moe : “I say, Japser. What comes after 75”?
Larry : “76”?
Moe : “That’s the Spirit”

William Jasper
The Boston Tea Party
Conflict and Revolution 1775 to 1776

Psalm 75 Kjv
5 Lift not up your horn on high: speak not with a stiff neck.
6 For promotion cometh neither from the east, nor from the west, nor from the south.
7 But God is the judge: he putteth down one, and setteth up another.

Whig
British political party, 1657, in part perhaps a disparaging use of whigg “a country bumpkin” (1640s); but mainly a shortened form of Whiggamore (1649) “one of the adherents of the Presbyterian cause in western Scotland who marched on Edinburgh in 1648 to oppose Charles I.” Perhaps originally “a horse drover,” from dialectal verb whig “to urge forward” + mare. In 1689 the name was first used in reference to members of the British political party that opposed the Tories. American Revolution sense of “colonist who opposes Crown policies” is from 1768. Later it was applied to opponents of Andrew Jackson (as early as 1825), and taken as the name of a political party (1834) that merged into the Republican Party in 1854-56.

In the spring of 1834 Jackson’s opponents adopted the name Whig, traditional term for critics of executive usurpations. James Watson Webb, editor of the New York Courier and Enquirer, encouraged use of the name. [Henry] Clay gave it national currency in a speech on April 14, 1834, likening “the whigs of the present day” to those who had resisted George III, and by summer it was official. [Daniel Walker Howe, “What Hath God Wrought,” 2007, p.390] …

asoasf


fiction n.
early 15c., ficcioun, “that which is invented or imagined in the mind,” from Old French
ficcion “dissimulation, ruse; invention, fabrication” (13c.) and directly from Latin fictionem (nominative fictio) “a fashioning or feigning,” noun of action from past participle stem of fingere “to shape, form, devise, feign,” originally “to knead, form out of clay,” from PIE *dheigh- “to build, form, knead” (source also of Old English dag “dough;” see dough).

Meaning “prose works (not dramatic) of the imagination” is from 1590s, at first often including plays and poems. Narrower sense of “the part of literature comprising novels and short stories based on imagined scenes or characters” is by early 19c. The legal sense (fiction of law) is from 1580s. A writer of fiction could be a fictionist (1827). The related Latin words included the literal notion “worked by hand,” as well as the figurative senses of “invented in the mind; artificial, not natural”: Latin fictilis “made of clay, earthen;” fictor “molder, sculptor” (also borrowed 17c. in English), but also of Ulysses as “master of deceit;” fictum “a deception, falsehood; fiction.”


ARTIFICIAL PRESUMPTIONS Al-
so called “legal presumptions;” those which derive their force and effect from the law, rather than their natural tendency to produce
belief. 3 S t a r k ie, Ev. 1235. Black’s Law 1st Edition – Sec. A


believe v.
Old English belyfan “to believe,” earlier geleafa (Mercian), gelefa (Northumbrian), gelyfan (West Saxon) “believe,” from Proto-Germanic *ga-laubjan “to believe,” perhaps literally “hold dear, love” (cognates: Old Saxon gilobian “believe,” Dutch geloven, Old High German gilouben, German glauben), ultimately a compound based on PIE *leubh- “to care, desire, love” (see belief).

Spelling beleeve is common till 17c.; then altered, perhaps by influence of relieve, etc. To believe on instead of in was more common in 16c. but now is a peculiarity of theology; believe of also sometimes was used in 17c. Related: Believed (formerly occasionally beleft); believing. Expression believe it or not attested by 1874; Robert Ripley’s newspaper cartoon of the same name is from 1918. Emphatic you better believe attested from 1854.

Matthew 6:24 Wyc
24 No man may serve two lords, for either he shall hate the one, and love the other; either he shall sustain the one, and despise the other. Ye be not able to serve God and riches.

Mammon n.
“personification of wealth,” mid-14c., from Late Latin mammona, from Greek mamonas, from Aramaic mamona, mamon “riches, gain;” left untranslated in Greek New Testament (e.g. Matt. vi:24, Luke xvi:9-13) retained in the Vulgate, and regarded mistakenly by medieval Christians as the name of a demon.


What is BELIEF?

A conviction of the truth of a proposition, existing subjectively in the mind, and induced by argument, persuasion, or proof addressed to the judgment Keller v. State, 102 Ga. 506, 31 S. E. 92. Belief is to be distinguished from “proof,” “evidence,” and “testimony.” See EVIDENCE. With regard to things which make not a very deep impression on the memory, it may be called “belief.” “Knowledge” is nothing more than a man’s firm belief. The difference is ordinarily merely in the degree ; to be judged of by the court, when addressed to the court; by the jury, when addressed to the jury. Hatch v. Carpenter, 9 Gray (Mass.) 274. The distinction between the two mental conditions seems to be that knowledge is an assurance of a fact or proposition founded on perception by the senses, or intuition; while belief is an assurance gained by evidence, and from other persons. Abbott

Bel
heaven-and-earth god of Babylonian religion, from Akkadian Belu, literally “lord, owner, master,” cognate with Hebrew ba’al.

belie v.
Old English beleogan “to deceive by lies,” from be- + lie (v.1) “to lie, tell lies.” Current sense of “to contradict as a lie” is first recorded 1640s. The other verb lie once also had a formation like this, from Old English belicgan, which meant “to encompass, beleaguer,” and in Middle English was a euphemism for “to have sex with” (i.e. “to lie with carnally”).

believe v.
Old English belyfan “to believe,” earlier geleafa (Mercian), gelefa (Northumbrian), gelyfan (West Saxon) “believe,” from Proto-Germanic *ga-laubjan “to believe,” perhaps literally “hold dear, love” (cognates: Old Saxon gilobian “believe,” Dutch geloven, Old High German gilouben, German glauben), ultimately a compound based on PIE *leubh- “to care, desire, love” (see belief).


BEHAVIOR. Manner of having, holding, or keep­ing one’s self ; manner of behaving, whether good or bad ; conduct ; manners ; carriage of one’s self, with respect to propriety and morals ; deport­ment. Webster. State v. Roll, 1 Ohio Dec. 284 ;Schneiderman v. United States, CaL, 63 S.Ct. 1333,1340, 320 U.S. 118, 87 L.Ed. 1796.
Surety to be of good behavior is a larger requirement than surety to keep the peace. Dalton, c. 122 ; 4 Burns,
Just. 355. pee Good Behavior. Blacks 4th


reality n.
1540s, “quality of being real,” from French réalité and directly Medieval Latin realitatem (nominative realitas), from Late Latin realis (see real (adj.)). Meaning “real existence, all that is real” is from 1640s; that of “the real state (of something)” is from 1680s. Sometimes 17c.-18c. also meaning “sincerity.” Reality-based attested from 1960. Reality television from 1991.


university n.
c. 1300, “institution of higher learning,” also “body of persons constituting a university,” from Anglo-French université, Old French universite “universality; academic community” (13c.), from Medieval Latin universitatem (nominative universitas), “the whole, aggregate,” in Late Latin “corporation, society,” from universus “whole, entire” (see universe). In the academic sense, a shortening of universitas magistrorum et scholarium “community of masters and scholars;” superseded studium as the word for this. The Latin word also is the source of Spanish universidad, German universität, Russian universitetŭ, etc.


employment n.
mid-15c., “the spending of money,” from Middle English emploien (see employ) + -ment.

mentis
mind; reason| intellect| judgement; plan| intention| frame of mind; courage

em suf.
the form assumed by the prefix en- prefix1 (q.v.) before b, p, and (frequently) m. For the reasons stated under en- prefix1, nearly all the English words with this prefix, whether of Romanic or English formation, have (or formerly had) alternative forms with impre.
a. em– + (n.,) ‘to put (something) into or upon what is denoted by the n.’; also ‘to put what is denoted by the n. into’ (something).
im-, pre.
assimilated form of in- prefix2, before b, m, p. This assimilation took place in Latin during the later classical period, and remains in French and English (although in- (en-) was not infrequent before p in Old French and Middle English). In words that survived in living use, Latin in-, im- became in Old French en-, em-.
imp, v.
1. trans. To graft, engraft. Obs.
b. In fig. context, applied to persons. Obs.
2. A subaltern or puny devil.
6. nonce-use. To mock like an imp or demon.
subaltern n.
“junior military officer,” 1680s, earlier more generally, “person of inferior rank” (c. 1600), noun use of adjective subaltern “having an inferior position, subordinate” (1580s), from Middle French subalterne, from Late Latin subalternus, from Latin sub “under” (see sub-) + alternus “every other (one), one after the other” (see alternate (adj.)).

P, n. Rho is the 17th letter of the Greek alphabet – It is derived from Phoenician letter res (Resh) “head
Hebrew: The letter Resh symbolises a bowed head. This is said to depict the poor man (raash), in acknowledgment of his state of servitude.
According to the Talmud (Oral Law), the letter Resh denotes the word rashah, meaning ‘a wicked person‘.
oi, int. and n.
Used to attract attention. Also used to express objection or annoyance.
loi nf (règle commune) (ruling) law n.
Eng: la loi Fre: the law
loy, n.
A kind of spade used in Ireland.
ploy, n.
From Old French emploiier (12c.)
1. Plight, condition; = ply n. 1. rare.
Etymology: A borrowing from French. Etymons: French ploi.
ploy, n.
A lawsuit or legal action; a dispute.
employ, n.
a. The action or fact of using or employing a person to perform a task, job, etc.; = employment n. 4a. Obs.
c. Following a possessive or with of: the state of being employed by a particular person, organization, etc.; the service of an employer.
3. An activity in which a person (or occas. thing) engages; a pursuit, an occupation.


“I dare do all that may become a man; Who dares do more, is none” ― William Shakespeare, Macbeth


foreigner n.
early 15c., foreyner; see foreign + -er (1).

In ordinary use chiefly applied to those who speak a foreign language as their native tongue; thus in England the term is not commonly understood to include Americans. [OED]

In American English from 1620s through mid-19c., however, it was used of a person from a different colony or state. Earlier as a noun in English was simple foreign (early 14c.), probably from Old French, which used the adjective as a noun meaning “foreigner;” also “outskirts; the outside world; latrine, privy.” Spelling furriner, representing pronunciation, is from 1832, originally in Irish dialect pieces but by 1840s picked up by American dialect writers (Thomas Chandler Haliburton).

alien n.
“foreigner, citizen of a foreign land,” from alien (adj.). In the science fiction sense, from 1953.


I have never understood why it is “greed” to want to keep the money you have earned but not greed to want to take somebody else’s money.” ― Thomas Sowell, Barbarians inside the Gates and Other Controversial Essays. Hoover Institution Press (January 1, 1999)


(The Rich Young Man) Mark 10:17-31 Kjv

2014 show 122 april 16

Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s

Directly download mp3


Tonight’s topic among others: a question via email “giving up person-hood” and;


Mark 12:17 Wyc
17 And Jesus answered and said to them, Then yield ye to the emperor those things that be the emperor’s; and to God those things that be of God. And they wondered of him.
Mark 12:17 Kjv
17 And Jesus answering said unto them, Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s. And they marvelled at him.

Render_unto_Caesar wiki


The Tribute Money
The Tribute Money, 1640. Preti, Mattia. Oil on canvas, 1930 x 1430 mm.

person n.
early 13c., from Old French persone “human being, anyone, person” (12c., Modern French personne) and directly from Latin persona “human being, person, personage; a part in a drama, assumed character,” originally “mask, false face,” such as those of wood or clay worn by the actors in later Roman theater. OED offers the general 19c. explanation of persona as “related to” Latin personare “to sound through” (i.e. the mask as something spoken through and perhaps amplifying the voice), “but the long o makes a difficulty ….” Klein and Barnhart say it is possibly borrowed from Etruscan phersu “mask.” Klein goes on to say this is ultimately of Greek origin and compares Persephone.

Of corporate entities from mid-15c. The use of -person to replace -man in compounds and avoid alleged sexist connotations is first recorded 1971 (in chairperson). In person “by bodily presence” is from 1560s. Person-to-person first recorded 1919, originally of telephone calls.


render v.
late 14c., “repeat, say again,” from Old French rendre “give back, present, yield” (10c.), from Vulgar Latin *rendere (formed by dissimilation or on analogy of its antonym, prendre “to take”), from Latin reddere “give back, return, restore,” from red- “back” (see re-) + comb. form of dare “to give” (see date(n.1)).

Meaning “hand over,deliver” is recorded from late 14c.; “to return” (thanks, a verdict, etc.) is attested from late 15c.; meaning “represent, depict” is first attested 1590s. Irregular retention of -er in a French verb in English is perhaps to avoid confusion with native rend (v.) or by influence of a Middle English legalese noun render “a payment of rent,” from French noun use of the infinitive. Related: Rendered; rendering.

2014 show 88 feb 26

Daniels first show on The Corporation Nation. Clint & Daniel expatiate over the Christian remedy in law.

Directly download mp3


Tonight’s topic among others: Daniels first show on The Corporation Nation and a must hear introduction to the subject of Christian remedy in law and;

(JPEG Image, 900 × 1314 pixels) - white


Romans 2:11 Wycliffe Bible Wyc
11 For acception of persons is not with God.

Deuteronomy 1:17 Wyc

No difference shall be in doom of persons; ye shall hear so a little man, that is, poor, as a great man, neither ye shall take heed to the person of any man, for it is the doom of God.
That if anything seemeth hard to you, tell ye that to me, and I shall hear it.

Acts 10:34 Wyc
And Peter opened his mouth, and said, In truth I have found, that God is no acceptor of persons;

James 2:9 Wyc
But if ye take persons, ye work sin, and be reproved of the law, as trespassers


secular adj.
c. 1300, “living in the world, not belonging to a religious order,” also “belonging to the state,” from Old French seculer (Modern French séculier), from Late Latin saecularis “worldly, secular, pertaining to a generation or age,” from Latin saecularis “of an age, occurring once in an age,” from saeculum “age, span of time, generation.”

According to Watkins, this is probably from PIE *sai-tlo-, with instrumental element *-tlo- + *sai- “to bind, tie” (see sinew), extended metaphorically to successive human generations as links in the chain of life. Another theory connects it with words for “seed,” from PIE root *se- “to sow” (see sow (v.), and compare Gothic mana-seþs “mankind, world,” literally “seed of men”).

Used in ecclesiastical writing like Greek aion “of this world” (see cosmos). It is source of French siècle. Ancient Roman ludi saeculares was a three-day, day-and-night celebration coming once in an “age” (120 years). In English, in reference to humanism and the exclusion of belief in God from matters of ethics and morality, from 1850s.

se
word-forming element, from Latin se-, collateral form of sed- “without, apart, aside, on one’s own,” related to sed, Latin reflexive pronoun (accusative and ablative), from PIE *sed-, extended form of root *s(w)e-, pronoun of the third person and reflexive (source also of German sich; see idiom).

ular
word-forming element, see -ule + -ar.

ule
word-forming element meaning “small, little” (in capsule, module, etc.), from French -ule, from Latin diminutive suffix -ulus (fem. -ula, neuter -ulum), from PIE *-(o)lo-, from *-lo-, secondary suffix forming diminutives, which also is the source of the first element in native diminutive suffix -ling.

yule, n.
2. Christmas and the festivities connected therewith. (Still the name in Sc. and north. dial.; since c1850 also a literary archaism in English). Freshly cut Log made kept burning for an extended length of time. Small pieces of old burned log ignite a new Yule log yearly.

ar
word-formation element meaning “pertaining to, of the nature of,” from Latin -arem, -aris “of the kind of, belonging to,” a secondary form of -alis, dissimilated form used after syllables with an -l- (such as insularis for *insulalis, stellaris for *stellalis).