2014 show 239 oct 22

Hyper empathy during Hyper modernity, evil in high places. Caesar is still an Arsehole. Bouvier gets Animalification and many that are first shall be last; and the last first.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Initially Daniel apologizes for last weeks Hyper Empathetic Outbursts, about those in Power, who Abuse their Offices on a Regular Basis! and a license to get into Heaven and;

Romans 2:11 Kjv
11 For there is no respect of persons with God.
Job 32:21 Kjv
21 Let me not, I pray you, accept any man’s person, neither let me give flattering titles unto man.
Philippians 4:11 Kjv
11 Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content.
James 2:9 Kjv
09 But if ye have respect to persons, ye commit sin, and are convinced of the law as transgressors.
Proverbs 28:21 Kjv
21 To have respect of persons is not good: for for a piece of bread that man will transgress.
Proverbs 24:23 Kjv
23 These things also belong to the wise. It is not good to have respect of persons in judgment.
Proverbs 18:5 Kjv
05 It is not good to accept the person of the wicked, to overthrow the righteous in judgment
Hebrews 12:16 Kjv
16 Lest there be any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for one morsel of meat sold his birthright.
1 Corinthians 5:13 Kjv
13 But them that are without God judgeth. Therefore put away from among yourselves that wicked person.
Leviticus 19:15 Kjv
5 Ye shall do no unrighteousness in judgment: thou shalt not respect the person of the poor, nor honor the person of the mighty: but in righteousness shalt thou judge thy neighbour.
Psalm 138:6 Kjv
6 Though the Lord be high, yet hath he respect unto the lowly: but the proud he knoweth afar off.
Ephesians 6:9 Kjv
9 And, ye masters, do the same things unto them, forbearing threatening: knowing that your Master also is in heaven; neither is there respect of persons with him.
James 2:1 Kjv
2 My brethren, have not the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord of glory, with respect of persons.
Psalm 49:10 Kjv
10 For he seeth that wise men die, likewise the fool and the brutish person perish, and leave their wealth to others.


personate v. rare
1. pretend to be someone you are not; sometimes with fraudulent intentions
She posed as the Czar’s daughter *
2. attribute human qualities to something
*The Greeks personated their gods ridiculous


consent n.
c. 1300, “approval,” also “agreement in sentiment, harmony,” from Old French consente, from consentir (see consent v.). Age of consent is attested from 1809.

consent v.
early 13c., from Old French consentir (12c.) “agree, comply,” from Latin consentire “feel together,” from com- “with” (see com-) + sentire “to feel” (see sense n.). “Feeling together,” hence, “agreeing, giving permission,” apparently a sense evolution that took place in French before the word reached English. Related: Consented; consenting.


implied consent
n. consent when surrounding circumstances exist which would lead a reasonable person to believe that this consent had been given, although no direct, express or explicit words of agreement had been uttered. Examples: a) a “contract” based on the fact that one person has been doing a particular thing and the other person expects him/her to continue; b) the defense in a “date rape” case in which there is a claim of assumed consent due to absence of protest or a belief that “no” really meant “yes,” “maybe” or “later.”


THE THREE STOOGES: Disorder in the Court (1936) (Remastered) (HD 1080p) [Youtube]

union_jack_gate.
Union Jack Gate is Close to the Defense

Moe & Larry play Noughts & Crosses on the Prosecutions Back with Chalk – (The game’s grid markings have been found chalked all over Rome) No matter who wins or looses the Lawyer always plays both sides.
Moe : “I say, Japser. What comes after 75”?
Larry : “76”?
Moe : “That’s the Spirit”

William Jasper
The Boston Tea Party
Conflict and Revolution 1775 to 1776

Psalm 75 Kjv
5 Lift not up your horn on high: speak not with a stiff neck.
6 For promotion cometh neither from the east, nor from the west, nor from the south.
7 But God is the judge: he putteth down one, and setteth up another.

Whig
British political party, 1657, in part perhaps a disparaging use of whigg “a country bumpkin” (1640s); but mainly a shortened form of Whiggamore (1649) “one of the adherents of the Presbyterian cause in western Scotland who marched on Edinburgh in 1648 to oppose Charles I.” Perhaps originally “a horse drover,” from dialectal verb whig “to urge forward” + mare. In 1689 the name was first used in reference to members of the British political party that opposed the Tories. American Revolution sense of “colonist who opposes Crown policies” is from 1768. Later it was applied to opponents of Andrew Jackson (as early as 1825), and taken as the name of a political party (1834) that merged into the Republican Party in 1854-56.

In the spring of 1834 Jackson’s opponents adopted the name Whig, traditional term for critics of executive usurpations. James Watson Webb, editor of the New York Courier and Enquirer, encouraged use of the name. [Henry] Clay gave it national currency in a speech on April 14, 1834, likening “the whigs of the present day” to those who had resisted George III, and by summer it was official. [Daniel Walker Howe, “What Hath God Wrought,” 2007, p.390] …

asoasf


fiction n.
early 15c., ficcioun, “that which is invented or imagined in the mind,” from Old French
ficcion “dissimulation, ruse; invention, fabrication” (13c.) and directly from Latin fictionem (nominative fictio) “a fashioning or feigning,” noun of action from past participle stem of fingere “to shape, form, devise, feign,” originally “to knead, form out of clay,” from PIE *dheigh- “to build, form, knead” (source also of Old English dag “dough;” see dough).

Meaning “prose works (not dramatic) of the imagination” is from 1590s, at first often including plays and poems. Narrower sense of “the part of literature comprising novels and short stories based on imagined scenes or characters” is by early 19c. The legal sense (fiction of law) is from 1580s. A writer of fiction could be a fictionist (1827). The related Latin words included the literal notion “worked by hand,” as well as the figurative senses of “invented in the mind; artificial, not natural”: Latin fictilis “made of clay, earthen;” fictor “molder, sculptor” (also borrowed 17c. in English), but also of Ulysses as “master of deceit;” fictum “a deception, falsehood; fiction.”


ARTIFICIAL PRESUMPTIONS Al-
so called “legal presumptions;” those which derive their force and effect from the law, rather than their natural tendency to produce
belief. 3 S t a r k ie, Ev. 1235. Black’s Law 1st Edition – Sec. A


believe v.
Old English belyfan “to believe,” earlier geleafa (Mercian), gelefa (Northumbrian), gelyfan (West Saxon) “believe,” from Proto-Germanic *ga-laubjan “to believe,” perhaps literally “hold dear, love” (cognates: Old Saxon gilobian “believe,” Dutch geloven, Old High German gilouben, German glauben), ultimately a compound based on PIE *leubh- “to care, desire, love” (see belief).

Spelling beleeve is common till 17c.; then altered, perhaps by influence of relieve, etc. To believe on instead of in was more common in 16c. but now is a peculiarity of theology; believe of also sometimes was used in 17c. Related: Believed (formerly occasionally beleft); believing. Expression believe it or not attested by 1874; Robert Ripley’s newspaper cartoon of the same name is from 1918. Emphatic you better believe attested from 1854.

Matthew 6:24 Wyc
24 No man may serve two lords, for either he shall hate the one, and love the other; either he shall sustain the one, and despise the other. Ye be not able to serve God and riches.

Mammon n.
“personification of wealth,” mid-14c., from Late Latin mammona, from Greek mamonas, from Aramaic mamona, mamon “riches, gain;” left untranslated in Greek New Testament (e.g. Matt. vi:24, Luke xvi:9-13) retained in the Vulgate, and regarded mistakenly by medieval Christians as the name of a demon.


What is BELIEF?

A conviction of the truth of a proposition, existing subjectively in the mind, and induced by argument, persuasion, or proof addressed to the judgment Keller v. State, 102 Ga. 506, 31 S. E. 92. Belief is to be distinguished from “proof,” “evidence,” and “testimony.” See EVIDENCE. With regard to things which make not a very deep impression on the memory, it may be called “belief.” “Knowledge” is nothing more than a man’s firm belief. The difference is ordinarily merely in the degree ; to be judged of by the court, when addressed to the court; by the jury, when addressed to the jury. Hatch v. Carpenter, 9 Gray (Mass.) 274. The distinction between the two mental conditions seems to be that knowledge is an assurance of a fact or proposition founded on perception by the senses, or intuition; while belief is an assurance gained by evidence, and from other persons. Abbott

Bel
heaven-and-earth god of Babylonian religion, from Akkadian Belu, literally “lord, owner, master,” cognate with Hebrew ba’al.

belie v.
Old English beleogan “to deceive by lies,” from be- + lie (v.1) “to lie, tell lies.” Current sense of “to contradict as a lie” is first recorded 1640s. The other verb lie once also had a formation like this, from Old English belicgan, which meant “to encompass, beleaguer,” and in Middle English was a euphemism for “to have sex with” (i.e. “to lie with carnally”).

believe v.
Old English belyfan “to believe,” earlier geleafa (Mercian), gelefa (Northumbrian), gelyfan (West Saxon) “believe,” from Proto-Germanic *ga-laubjan “to believe,” perhaps literally “hold dear, love” (cognates: Old Saxon gilobian “believe,” Dutch geloven, Old High German gilouben, German glauben), ultimately a compound based on PIE *leubh- “to care, desire, love” (see belief).


BEHAVIOR. Manner of having, holding, or keep­ing one’s self ; manner of behaving, whether good or bad ; conduct ; manners ; carriage of one’s self, with respect to propriety and morals ; deport­ment. Webster. State v. Roll, 1 Ohio Dec. 284 ;Schneiderman v. United States, CaL, 63 S.Ct. 1333,1340, 320 U.S. 118, 87 L.Ed. 1796.
Surety to be of good behavior is a larger requirement than surety to keep the peace. Dalton, c. 122 ; 4 Burns,
Just. 355. pee Good Behavior. Blacks 4th


reality n.
1540s, “quality of being real,” from French réalité and directly Medieval Latin realitatem (nominative realitas), from Late Latin realis (see real (adj.)). Meaning “real existence, all that is real” is from 1640s; that of “the real state (of something)” is from 1680s. Sometimes 17c.-18c. also meaning “sincerity.” Reality-based attested from 1960. Reality television from 1991.


university n.
c. 1300, “institution of higher learning,” also “body of persons constituting a university,” from Anglo-French université, Old French universite “universality; academic community” (13c.), from Medieval Latin universitatem (nominative universitas), “the whole, aggregate,” in Late Latin “corporation, society,” from universus “whole, entire” (see universe). In the academic sense, a shortening of universitas magistrorum et scholarium “community of masters and scholars;” superseded studium as the word for this. The Latin word also is the source of Spanish universidad, German universität, Russian universitetŭ, etc.


employment n.
mid-15c., “the spending of money,” from Middle English emploien (see employ) + -ment.

mentis
mind; reason| intellect| judgement; plan| intention| frame of mind; courage

em suf.
the form assumed by the prefix en- prefix1 (q.v.) before b, p, and (frequently) m. For the reasons stated under en- prefix1, nearly all the English words with this prefix, whether of Romanic or English formation, have (or formerly had) alternative forms with impre.
a. em– + (n.,) ‘to put (something) into or upon what is denoted by the n.’; also ‘to put what is denoted by the n. into’ (something).
im-, pre.
assimilated form of in- prefix2, before b, m, p. This assimilation took place in Latin during the later classical period, and remains in French and English (although in- (en-) was not infrequent before p in Old French and Middle English). In words that survived in living use, Latin in-, im- became in Old French en-, em-.
imp, v.
1. trans. To graft, engraft. Obs.
b. In fig. context, applied to persons. Obs.
2. A subaltern or puny devil.
6. nonce-use. To mock like an imp or demon.
subaltern n.
“junior military officer,” 1680s, earlier more generally, “person of inferior rank” (c. 1600), noun use of adjective subaltern “having an inferior position, subordinate” (1580s), from Middle French subalterne, from Late Latin subalternus, from Latin sub “under” (see sub-) + alternus “every other (one), one after the other” (see alternate (adj.)).

P, n. Rho is the 17th letter of the Greek alphabet – It is derived from Phoenician letter res (Resh) “head
Hebrew: The letter Resh symbolises a bowed head. This is said to depict the poor man (raash), in acknowledgment of his state of servitude.
According to the Talmud (Oral Law), the letter Resh denotes the word rashah, meaning ‘a wicked person‘.
oi, int. and n.
Used to attract attention. Also used to express objection or annoyance.
loi nf (règle commune) (ruling) law n.
Eng: la loi Fre: the law
loy, n.
A kind of spade used in Ireland.
ploy, n.
From Old French emploiier (12c.)
1. Plight, condition; = ply n. 1. rare.
Etymology: A borrowing from French. Etymons: French ploi.
ploy, n.
A lawsuit or legal action; a dispute.
employ, n.
a. The action or fact of using or employing a person to perform a task, job, etc.; = employment n. 4a. Obs.
c. Following a possessive or with of: the state of being employed by a particular person, organization, etc.; the service of an employer.
3. An activity in which a person (or occas. thing) engages; a pursuit, an occupation.


“I dare do all that may become a man; Who dares do more, is none” ― William Shakespeare, Macbeth


foreigner n.
early 15c., foreyner; see foreign + -er (1).

In ordinary use chiefly applied to those who speak a foreign language as their native tongue; thus in England the term is not commonly understood to include Americans. [OED]

In American English from 1620s through mid-19c., however, it was used of a person from a different colony or state. Earlier as a noun in English was simple foreign (early 14c.), probably from Old French, which used the adjective as a noun meaning “foreigner;” also “outskirts; the outside world; latrine, privy.” Spelling furriner, representing pronunciation, is from 1832, originally in Irish dialect pieces but by 1840s picked up by American dialect writers (Thomas Chandler Haliburton).

alien n.
“foreigner, citizen of a foreign land,” from alien (adj.). In the science fiction sense, from 1953.


I have never understood why it is “greed” to want to keep the money you have earned but not greed to want to take somebody else’s money.” ― Thomas Sowell, Barbarians inside the Gates and Other Controversial Essays. Hoover Institution Press (January 1, 1999)


(The Rich Young Man) Mark 10:17-31 Kjv

2014 show 197 aug 20

Due to technical problems Daniel wasn’t able to appear, but Clint covered “this monetary thing” on his own.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Due to technical problems Daniel wasn’t able to appear, but Clint covered “this monetary thing” on his own. Daniel is heard briefly also fixing some water issue in the background and the Secular and Spiritual Side of Money and Clint takes calls and;

confidence (n.) early 15c., from Middle French confidence or directly from Latin confidentia, from confidentem (nominative confidens) “firmly trusting, bold,” present participle of confidere “to have full trust or reliance,” from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + fidere “to trust” (see faith). For sense of “swindle” see con (adj.).

money (n.) mid-13c., “coinage, metal currency,” from Old French monoie “money, coin, currency; change” (Modern French monnaie), from Latin moneta “place for coining money, mint; coined money, money, coinage,” from Moneta, a title or surname of the Roman goddess Juno, in or near whose temple money was coined; perhaps from monere “advise, warn” (see monitor (n.)), with the sense of “admonishing goddess,” which is sensible, but the etymology is difficult. Extended early 19c. to include paper money.

fiat (n.) 1630s, “authoritative sanction,” from Latin fiat “let it be done” (used in the opening of Medieval Latin proclamations and commands), third person singular present subjunctive of fieri “be done, become, come into existence,” used as passive of facere “to make, do” (see factitious). Meaning “a decree, command, order” is from 1750. In English the word also sometimes is a reference to fiat lux “let there be light” in Gen. i:3.

Dixitque Deus: Fiat lux. Et facta est lux. [Vulgate]

hypothecate (v.) 1680s, “pledge (something) without giving up control of it; pawn; mortgage,” from hypothecat-, past participle stem of Medieval Latin hypothecare, from Late Latin hypotheca “a pledge,” from Greek hypotheke “a deposit, pledge, mortgage,” from hypo- “beneath, under” (see hypo-) + tithenai “to put, place” (see theme). Related: Hypothecated; hypothecating; hypothecation; hypothecary.

2014 show 112 april 02

Forgive to us our debts, as we forgive to our debtors and the Super Sonic Fraudsters for the Pagan Universal Church

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Tonight’s topic among others: Matthew 6 and the Super Sonic Fraudsters for the Pope and;


Matthew 6 Wyc
9 And thus ye shall pray, Our Father that art in heavens, hallowed be thy name;
10 thy kingdom come to; be thy will done in earth as it is in heaven;
11 give to us this day our each day’s bread;
2 and forgive to us our debts, as we forgive to our debtors;
13 and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.
24 No man may serve two lords, for either he shall hate the one, and love the other; either he shall sustain the one [or he shall sustain the one], and despise the other. Ye be not able to serve God and riches.


Jean Baudrillard – Simulacra and Simulation .pdf


bill n. ancient weapon, Old English bill “sword (especially one with a hooked blade), chopping tool,” common Germanic (compare Old Saxon bil “sword,” Middle Dutch bile, Dutch bijl, Old High German bihal, German Beil, Old Norse bilda “hatchet.”…
bill n.written statement,” mid-14c., from Anglo-French bille, Anglo-Latin billa “list,” from Medieval Latin bulla “decree, seal, sealed document,” in classical Latin “bubble, boss, stud, amulet for the neck” (hence “seal;” see bull (n.2)). Sense of “account, invoice” first recorded c. 1400; that of “order to pay” (technically bill of exchange) is from 1570s; that of “paper money” is from 1660s. Meaning “draft of an act of Parliament” is from 1510s.

be v. Old English beon, beom, bion “be, exist, come to be, become, happen,” from Proto-Germanic *biju- “I am, I will be.” This “b-root” is from PIE root *bheue- “to be, exist, grow, come into being,” and in addition to the words in English it yielded German present first and second person singular (bin, bist, from Old High German bim “I am,” bist “thou art”), Latin perfective tenses of esse (fui “I was,” etc.), Old Church Slavonic byti “be,” Greek phu- “become,” Old Irish bi’u “I am,” Lithuanian bu’ti “to be,” Russian byt’ “to be,” etc. It also is behind Sanskrit bhavah “becoming,” bhavati “becomes, happens,” bhumih “earth, world.”
ill adj. c. 1200, “wickedly; with hostility,” from ill (adj.). Meaning “not well, poorly” is from c. 1300. It generally has not shifted to the realm of physical sickess, as the adjective has done. Ill-fated recorded from 1710; ill-informed from 1824; ill-tempered from c. 1600; ill-starred from c. 1600. Generally contrasted with well, hence the useful, but now obsolete or obscure illcome (1570s), illfare (c. 1300), and illth.
ill adj. c. 1200, “morally evil; offensive, objectionable” (other 13c. senses were “malevolent, hurtful, unfortunate, difficult”), from Old Norse illr “evil, bad; hard, difficult; mean, stingy,” a word of unknown origin. Not considered to be related to evil. From mid-14c. as “marked by evil intentions; harmful, pernicious.” Sense of “sick, unhealthy, diseased, unwell” is first recorded mid-15c., probably from a use similar to that in the Old Norse idiom “it is bad to me.” Slang inverted sense of “very good, cool” is 1980s. As a noun, “something evil,” from mid-13c.
ill v. early 13c., “do evil to,” from ill (adj.). Meaning “speak disparagingly” is from 1520s. Related: Illed; illing.


synonym n. “word having the same sense as another,” early 15c. (but usually in plural form before 18c., or, if singular, as synonyma), from Old French synonyme (12c.) and directly from Late Latin synonymum, from Greek synonymon “word having the same sense as another,” noun use of neuter of synonymos “having the same name as, synonymous,” from syn- “together, same” (see syn-) + onyma, Aeolic dialectal form of onoma “name” (see name n.).


Luke 11:52 Kjv
52 Woe unto you, lawyers! for ye have taken away the key of knowledge: ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in ye hindered.

Luke 11:52 Wyc
52 Woe to you, wise men of the law, for ye have taken away the key of knowing; and ye yourselves entered not, and ye have forbidden them that entered.


James 5 Wyc
1 Do now, ye rich men, weep ye, yelling in your wretchednesses that shall come to you.
2 Your riches be rotten, and your clothes be eaten of moths.
3 Your gold and silver hath rusted, and the rust of them shall be to you into witnessing, and shall eat your fleshes, as fire. Ye have treasured to you wrath in the last days.
4 Lo! the hire of your workmen, that reaped your fields, which is defrauded of you [which is frauded of you], crieth; and the cry of them hath entered into the ears of the Lord of hosts.
5 Ye have eaten on the earth, and in your lecheries ye have nourished your hearts. In the day of slaying


Leviticus 6:4 Wyc
if it is convicted of the guilt, he shall yield whole all things which he would get by fraud, (if he is convicted, and found guilty, he shall give back whole everything which he hath gotten by fraud,)
Joshua 9:22
Joshua called (for the) Gibeonites, and said to them, Why would ye deceive us by fraud, (so) that ye said, We dwell full far from you, since ye be in the midst of us? (We live far away from you, when truly ye live right here in the midst of us?)
Judges 11:9
And Jephthah said to them, Whether ye came verily, or without fraud, to me, that I fight for you against the sons of Ammon, and if the Lord shall betake them into mine hands, shall I be your prince?
Proverbs 24:2
For the soul of them bethinketh (on) ravens, and their lips speak frauds.


impersonation n. 1800, “personification;” 1825 as “an acting of a part or character;” noun of action from impersonate v.


fee n. Middle English, representing the merger or mutual influence of two words, one from Old English, one from an Old French form of the same Germanic word, and both ultimately from a PIE root meaning “cattle.”

The Old English word is feoh “livestock, cattle; movable property; possessions in livestock, goods, or money; riches, treasure, wealth; money as a medium of exchange or payment,” from Proto-Germanic *fehu- (cognates: Old Saxon fehu, Old High German fihu, German Vieh “cattle,” Gothic faihu “money, fortune”). This is from PIE *peku- “cattle” (cognates: Sanskrit pasu, Lithuanian pekus “cattle;” Latin pecu “cattle,” pecunia “money, property”).

The other word is Anglo-French fee, from Old French fieu, a variant of fief “possession, holding, domain; feudal duties, payment” (see fief ), which apparently is a Germanic compound in which the first element is cognate with Old English feoh.

Via Anglo-French come the legal senses “estate in land or tenements held on condition of feudal homage; land, property, possession” (c. 1300). Hence fee-simple (late 14c.) “absolute ownership,” as opposed to fee-tail (early 15c.) “entailed ownership,” inheritance limited to some particular class of heirs (second element from Old French taillir “to cut, to limit”).

The feudal sense was extended from landholdings to inheritable offices of service to a feudal lord (late 14c.; in Anglo-French late 13c.), for example forester of fe “a forester by heritable right.” As these often were offices of profit, the word came to be used for “remuneration for service in office” (late 14c.), hence, “payment for (any kind of) work or services” (late 14c.). From late 14c. as “a sum paid for a privilege” (originally admission to a guild); early 15c. as “money payment or charge exacted for a license, etc.”


Colossians 2
13 And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses;
14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;
15 And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it.

2014 show 88 feb 26

Daniels first show on The Corporation Nation. Clint & Daniel expatiate over the Christian remedy in law.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Daniels first show on The Corporation Nation and a must hear introduction to the subject of Christian remedy in law and;

(JPEG Image, 900 × 1314 pixels) - white


Romans 2:11 Wycliffe Bible Wyc
11 For acception of persons is not with God.

Deuteronomy 1:17 Wyc

No difference shall be in doom of persons; ye shall hear so a little man, that is, poor, as a great man, neither ye shall take heed to the person of any man, for it is the doom of God.
That if anything seemeth hard to you, tell ye that to me, and I shall hear it.

Acts 10:34 Wyc
And Peter opened his mouth, and said, In truth I have found, that God is no acceptor of persons;

James 2:9 Wyc
But if ye take persons, ye work sin, and be reproved of the law, as trespassers


secular adj.
c. 1300, “living in the world, not belonging to a religious order,” also “belonging to the state,” from Old French seculer (Modern French séculier), from Late Latin saecularis “worldly, secular, pertaining to a generation or age,” from Latin saecularis “of an age, occurring once in an age,” from saeculum “age, span of time, generation.”

According to Watkins, this is probably from PIE *sai-tlo-, with instrumental element *-tlo- + *sai- “to bind, tie” (see sinew), extended metaphorically to successive human generations as links in the chain of life. Another theory connects it with words for “seed,” from PIE root *se- “to sow” (see sow (v.), and compare Gothic mana-seþs “mankind, world,” literally “seed of men”).

Used in ecclesiastical writing like Greek aion “of this world” (see cosmos). It is source of French siècle. Ancient Roman ludi saeculares was a three-day, day-and-night celebration coming once in an “age” (120 years). In English, in reference to humanism and the exclusion of belief in God from matters of ethics and morality, from 1850s.

se
word-forming element, from Latin se-, collateral form of sed- “without, apart, aside, on one’s own,” related to sed, Latin reflexive pronoun (accusative and ablative), from PIE *sed-, extended form of root *s(w)e-, pronoun of the third person and reflexive (source also of German sich; see idiom).

ular
word-forming element, see -ule + -ar.

ule
word-forming element meaning “small, little” (in capsule, module, etc.), from French -ule, from Latin diminutive suffix -ulus (fem. -ula, neuter -ulum), from PIE *-(o)lo-, from *-lo-, secondary suffix forming diminutives, which also is the source of the first element in native diminutive suffix -ling.

yule, n.
2. Christmas and the festivities connected therewith. (Still the name in Sc. and north. dial.; since c1850 also a literary archaism in English). Freshly cut Log made kept burning for an extended length of time. Small pieces of old burned log ignite a new Yule log yearly.

ar
word-formation element meaning “pertaining to, of the nature of,” from Latin -arem, -aris “of the kind of, belonging to,” a secondary form of -alis, dissimilated form used after syllables with an -l- (such as insularis for *insulalis, stellaris for *stellalis).