2014 show 265 dec 03

Daniel’s playing with ignis not the fraudulent suppression of facts, but the eater of them and; He who puts his hand therein receives no injury and the Unholy Church.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Adults and their Toys, Life in our Bio-metric Prison! Cloning animals and cattle, they have your DNA.


technology n.
1610s, “a discourse or treatise on an art or the arts,” from Greek tekhnologia “systematic treatment of an art, craft, or technique,” originally referring to grammar, from tekhno- (see techno-) + -logy. The meaning “study of mechanical and industrial arts” (Century Dictionary, 1902, gives examples of “spinning, metal-working, or brewing”) is first recorded 1859. High technology attested from 1964; short form high-tech is from 1972.
logy
word-forming element meaning “a speaking, discourse, treatise, doctrine, theory, science,” from Greek -logia (often via French -logie or Medieval Latin -logia), from root of legein “to speak;” thus, “the character or deportment of one who speaks or treats of (a certain subject);” see lecture n.


human adj.
mid-15c., humain, humaigne, “human,” from Old French humain, umain (adj.) “of or belonging to man” (12c.), from Latin humanus “of man, human,” also “humane, philanthropic, kind, gentle, polite; learned, refined, civilized.” This is in part from PIE *(dh)ghomon-, literally “earthling, earthly being,” as opposed to the gods (see homunculus). Compare Hebrew adam “man,” from adamah “ground.” Cognate with Old Lithuanian zmuo (accusative zmuni) “man, male person.”
Human interest is from 1824. Human rights attested by 1680s; human being by 1690s. Human relations is from 1916; human resources attested by 1907, American English, apparently originally among social Christians and based on natural resources.
homunculus n.
“tiny human being produced artificially,” 1650s, from Latin homunculus (plural homunculi), literally “little person,” with -culus, diminutive suffix, + homo (genitive hominis), which technically meant “male human,” but it also was used with a sense “the human race, mankind;” while in Vulgar Latin it could be used as “one, anyone, they, people” and in logical and scholastic writing as “a human being, person.” This is conjectured to be perhaps from PIE *(dh)ghomon-, literally “earthling,” from *dhghem- “earth” (see chthonic; also compare human). Other Latin diminutives from homo included homullus, homuncio.


scienter n.
A. n. Law.
The fact that an act was done with knowledge of the probable consequences, esp. when this constitutes a ground for civil damages or criminal punishment. Freq. in to prove (a) scienter: to prove that an act was done knowingly.
Often used in relation to the liability of the owner of an animal known to be dangerous for injury or damage caused by that animal
B. adv. Chiefly Law. Knowingly.
1673 W. Lucy Answer to Hobbs his Leviathan ii. xxiii. 199 To understand this know that he who obeys Gods commands, must do it as a man scienter knowingly.
1683 J. Dalrymple Decisions Lords of Council & Session I. 205 Being done by the Testator scienter, who cannot be presumed, to be ignorant of his own Assignation, lately made before.


He who consents cannot receive an injury
One who wills a thing to be or to be done cannot complain of that thing as an injury
The government cannot confer a favor which occasions injury and loss to others.


subreption n.
“act of obtaining a favor by fraudulent suppression of facts,” c. 1600, from Latin subreptionem (nominative subreptio), noun of action from past participle stem of subripere, surripere (see surreptitious). Related: Subreptitious.
a. Ecclesiastical Law. Suppression of the truth or concealment of facts in order to obtain a dispensation, etc.Contrasted with
obreption n.
The action of obtaining or trying to obtain something by fraud; an attempt to do this; spec. (a) Ecclesiastical Law the obtaining of a dispensation, etc., by false statement; (b) Sc. Law the obtaining of gifts of escheat, etc., by means of falsehood. Cf. subreption n.
escheat n.
a. An ‘incident’ of feudal law, whereby a fief reverted to the lord when the tenant died without leaving a successor qualified to inherit under the original grant. Hence, the lapsing of land to the Crown (in U.S., to the state), or to the lord of the manor, on the death of the owner intestate without heirs.As an attainted person, according to the doctrine of ‘corruption of blood’ (see attainder n.), could have no legal heir, his property suffered escheat. This ‘escheat by corruption of blood’, theoretically distinct from the ‘forfeiture’ inflicted as a penalty for treason and felony, was abolished together with the latter by the Felony Act, 1870.


signature analysis


Confirmation. Giuseppe Maria Crespi.
Confirmation. Giuseppe Maria Crespi, oil on canvas, H:125 cm W: 93cm 1712

conformation n.
1510s, from Latin conformationem (nominative conformatio) “a symmetrical forming,” noun of action from past participle stem of conformare (see conform).

Where the Bishop is, there let the multitude of believers be; even as where Jesus is, there is the Catholic Church
Ignatius of Antioch, 1st c. A.D


article n.
2. A separate clause or provision of a statute, constitution, code, etc., typically one outlining a single regulation; an act; a rule. Formerly also: †a separate point in a request or petition (obs.).
a. article of faith: a fundamental tenet or belief of a particular religion or denomination, spec. any of the items in a formal summary of faith; (hence, in pl.) a summary of faith, a creed; also in extended use.


The Thirteen Articles .pdf

  1. The Unity of God and the Trinity of Persons
    Concerning the Unity of the Divine Being and the Three Persons, we hold the decree of the Council of Nicaea to be true and without any doubt to be believed, viz, that there is one divine essence which is both called and is God. eternal. incorporeal. indivisible. of immense oower wisdom and goodness.
    Creator and Preserver of all things visible and invisible, and yet there are three Persons of the same essence and power, coeternal, Father. The Thirteen Articles Son and Holy Spirit; and we call each person by the same name and with the same meaning as used by the Church Fathers, i.e. as signifying not a part or a quality in another being, but as subsisting in themselves.
    We condemn all the heresies which have arisen against this article, e.g. the Manichees, who posited two principles, one good and one bad; likewise the Arians, Eunomians, Muslims and all like them. We also condemn the Adoptionists, ancient and modern, who argue that there is only one person and cleverly and impiously prate that the Word and the Holy Spirit are not distinct persons, but that the Word is just a verbal utterance and the Spirit just a movement created in things.

The Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion Church of England

Article I: Of Faith in the Holy Trinity
There is but one living and true God, everlasting, without body, parts, or passions; of infinite power, wisdom, and goodness; the Maker, and Preserver of all things both visible and invisible. And in unity of this Godhead there be three Persons, of one substance, power, and eternity; the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.

Article II: Of the Word or Son of God, which was made very Man
The Son, which is the Word of the Father, begotten from everlasting of the Father, the very and eternal God, and of one substance with the Father, took Man’s nature in the womb of the blessed Virgin, of her substance: so that two whole and perfect Natures, that is to say, the Godhead and Manhood, were joined together in one Person, never to be divided, whereof is one Christ, very God, and very Man; who truly suffered, was crucified, dead, and buried, to reconcile His Father to us, and to be a sacrifice, not only for original guilt, but also for all actual sins of men.

Article III: Of the going down of Christ into Hell
As Christ died for us, and was buried, so also is it to be believed, that he went down into Hell.

Article IV: Of the Resurrection of Christ
Christ did truly rise again from death, and took again his body, with flesh, bones, and all things appertaining to the perfection of Man’s nature; wherewith he ascended into Heaven, and there sitteth, until he return to judge all Men at the last day.

Resurrection_Raffaelino_del_Garbo_1510
The Resurrection of Our Lord – Easter Day – Raffaelino del Garbo 1510

Article V: Of the Holy Ghost
The Holy Ghost, proceeding from the Father and the Son, is of one substance, majesty, and glory, with the Father and the Son, very and eternal God…

Thirty-nine Articles plural n.
a set of formulas defining the doctrinal position of the Church of England, drawn up in the 16th century, to which the clergy are required to give general consent.

The Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion are the historically defining statements of doctrines of the Church of England with respect to the controversies of the English Reformation. Wiki


subscription n.
c. 1400, “piece of writing at the end of a document,” from Middle French subscription (Modern French souscription) and directly from Latin subscriptionem (nominative subscriptio) “anything written underneath, a signature,” noun of action from past participle stem of subscribere (see subscribe). Meaning “act of subscribing money” is from 1640s.


It is like a surname: if the name is “I am Christian,” the surname is “I belong to the Church.”
We are not isolated and we are not Christians as individuals, each one on his own. No. Our Christian identity is belonging! We are Christians because we belong to the Church. It is like a surname: if the name is I am Christian, the surname is I belong to the Church. It is beautiful to note how this belonging is expressed also in the name that God attributes to Himself. Responding to Moses, in the wonderful episode of the burning bush (cf. Exodus 3:15), He describes Himself, in fact, as the God of the Fathers. He does not say: I am Omnipotent …, no: I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob. In this way, he calls us to enter into this relation that precedes us. God’s relation with His people precedes us all, it comes from that time. audience address on belonging to the church
Also mentioned in 2014 show 258 nov 19


SPIRITUAL adj.
1. Consisting of spirit; not material; incorporeal; as a spiritual substance or being. The soul of man is spiritual
2. Mental; intellectual; as spiritual armor.
3. Not gross; refined from external things; not sensual; relative to mind only; as a spiritual and refined religion.
4. Not lay or temporal; relating to sacred things; ecclesiastical; as the spiritual functions of the clergy; the lords spiritual and temporal; a spiritual corporation.
5. Pertaining to spirit or to the affections; pure; holy.
Gods law is spiritual; it is a transcript of the divine nature, and extends its authority to the acts of the soul of man.
6. Pertaining to the renewed nature of man; as spiritual life.
7. Not fleshly; not material; as spiritual sacrifices. 1 Peter 2:5.
8. Pertaining to divine things; as spiritual songs. Ephesians 5:19.
SPIRITUAL court, an ecclesiastical court; a court held by a bishop or other ecclesiastic. Websters1828


Incorporate v. adj.
1. Not consisting of matter; not having a material body. Obs.
2. Mixed; united in one body; associated.
The idolaters, who worshiped their images as gods, supposed some spirit to be incorporated therein.
6. To form into a legal body, or body politic; to constitute a body, composed of one or more individuals, with the quality of perpetual existence or succession, unless limited by the act of incorporation; as, to incorporate the inhabitants of a city, town or parish; to incorporate the proprietors of a bridge, the stockholders of a bank, of an insurance company, etc. New Haven was incorporated in January 1784; Hartford in May 1784.


request v.
1530s, from request (n.) or from Middle French requester, from Old French requester “ask again, request, reclaim,” from requeste. Related: Requested; requesting.
request n.
mid-14c., from Old French requeste (Modern French requête) “a request,” from Vulgar Latin *requaesita, from Latin requisita “a thing asked for,” fem. of requisitus “requested, demanded,” from past participle stem of requirere (see require).


solicit v.
early 15c., “to disturb, trouble,” from Middle French soliciter (14c.), from Latin sollicitare “to disturb, rouse, trouble, harass; stimulate, provoke,” from sollicitus “agitated,” from sollus “whole, entire” + citus “aroused,” past participle of ciere “shake, excite, set in motion” (see cite). Related: Solicited; soliciting.

Meaning “entreat, petition” is from 1520s. Meaning “to further (business affairs)” evolved mid-15c. from Middle French sense of “manage affairs.” The sexual sense (often in reference to prostitutes) is attested from 1710, probably from a merger of the business sense and an earlier sense of “to court or beg the favor of” (a woman), attested from 1590s.


Ephesians 6:12 Kjv
12 For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.


rescission n.
1610s, “action of cutting off;” 1650s, “action of annulling,” from Late Latin rescissionem (nominative rescisio) “annulment,” noun of action from past participle stem of rescindere “to cut off; abolish” (see rescind).
recision n.
“act of cutting off,” 1610s, from Middle French recision, alteration of rescision (from Late Latin rescissionem “annulment;” see rescission), influenced in form by Late Latin recisionem (nominative recisio) “a cutting back,” noun of action from past participle stem of recidere “to cut back” (see recidivist).
rescind v.
1630s, from French rescinder “cut off, cancel” (15c.), and directly from Latin rescindere “to cut off, tear off, abolish,” from re- “back” (see re-) + scindere “to cut, split” (see shed (v.)). Related: Rescinded; rescinding.
cide
word-forming element meaning “killer,” from French –cide, from Latin -cida “cutter, killer, slayer,” from -cidere, comb. form of caedere “to strike down, chop, beat, hew, fell, slay,” from PIE *kae-id-, from root *(s)k(h)ai- “to strike” (Pokorny, not in Watkins; cognates: Sanskrit skhidati “beats, tears,” Lithuanian kaisti “shave,” German heien “beat”). For Latin vowel change, see acquisition. The element also can represent “killing,” from French –cide, from Latin -cidium “a cutting, a killing.”


Carry on Henry Continues to provide perfect examples of how/why the World is the way it is. File under Divorce.

2014 show 262 nov 26

Is the Bible not a compendium of Ancient Knowledge? Bread of deceit is sweet to a man, Confessions Of A Former Truther Government is your god. Volunteerism.

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Tonight’s topic among others: Everyone can benefit from the Bible! Many sections of the Bible, originated long before Christ! The Bible is not a Plagiarism, it is a compendium of Ancient Knowledge! Voluntary Societies – We already Live in One!


Revelation 13:17 Kjb
17 And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.

beast. Any animal with four feet; a brutish, vile, or lecherous person.

monster. A plant or creature terribly deformed. A human-being by birth, but in some part resembling a lower animal.
A monster . . . hath no inheritable blood, and cannot be heir to any land, albeit it be brought forth in marriage; but,
although it hath deformity in any part of its body, yet if it hath human shape, it may be heir
.” 2 Bl Comm 246.
BALLENTINE’S LAW DICTIONARY – THIRD EDITION


signature n.
1530s, a kind of document in Scottish law, from Middle French signature (16c.) or directly from Medieval Latin signatura “signature, a rescript,” in classical Latin “the matrix of a seal,” from signatus, past participle of signare “to mark with a stamp, sign” (see sign n.).
Meaning “one’s own name written in one’s own hand” is from 1570s, replacing sign-manual (early 15c.) in this sense. Musical sense of “signs placed it the beginning of a staff to indicate the key and rhythm” is from 1806. Meaning “a distinguishing mark of any kind” is from 1620s
SIG n.
a Saxon word signifying victory. is used in names, as in Sigbert, bright victory. In answers to the Greek vix in Nicander, and the Latin vic, in Victorinus.
sig Strong’s No.:H7873 pursuing
Transliteration: ώîyg
Pronunciation: seeg
Definition: From H7734; a withdrawl (into a private place): – pursuing.
Occurences: pursuing (1)

1 Kings 18:27 Kjv. And it came to pass at noon, that Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud: for he is a god; either he is talking, or he is pursuing, or he is in a journey, or peradventure he sleepeth, and must be awaked.

pursuing(Webster’s 1828 Dictionary)
pursuing ppr. Following; chasing; hastening after to overtake; prosecuting; proceeding in; continuing.

Gary Rendsburg’s paper (The Mock of Baal in 1 Kings 18:27) The Catholic Biblical Quarterly 1988. Vol 50, No.3

“In short there is good reason to conclude that both elements in the hendiadys, siah and sig, refer to excretion…”

nay
word of negation, late 12c., from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse nei, compound of ne “not” (see un-) + ei “ever” (see aye.
, ; adv.No, not; non.
Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional na,
na, conj. Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional (north-west.) 19– na. Etymology : Perhaps formed within English, by compounding. Etymons: English na , no conj.
tau (Τ τ) :
nineteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, from Hebrew taw, last letter of the Hebrew alphabet, literally “sign, mark.”
In ancient times, Tau was used as a symbol for life and/or resurrection, whereas the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, theta, was considered the symbol of death.
In Biblical times, the Taw was put on men to distinguish those who lamented sin, although newer versions of the Bible have replaced the ancient term “Taw” with “mark” (Ezekiel 9:4) or “signature” (Job 31:35).

The sign of the cross. The mark of Cain… The image of containment or suppression
Letter Perfect p301.
David Sacks. 2003 ISBN 0-7679-1173-3

ur, (n). An inarticulate sound, uttered instead of a word that the speaker is unable to remember or bring out.
úre gen. pl. of personal pronoun of first person. Of us Adam can yfel and gód, swá swá úre sum (quasi unus ex nobis ), Gen. 3, 22.
úre adj. pronoun. I. our
ure, n.1
Etymology: Anglo-Norman *eure, = Old French uevre , euvre , evre (13th cent.; French œuvre ) Latin opera opera n.2(Show Less)
I. in ure:
a. In or into use, practice, or performance. Often with vbs., as bring, come, have, and esp. put (freq. c1510–1630). Also rarely with into.
b. With dependent infinitive.
c. With reference to statutes, etc.: In or into effect, force, or operation. Chiefly with vbs., esp. put.
d. In remembrance or recollection. Only to have..in ure.
e. In or into a state of prevalence or existence. Chiefly with vbs., as come, draw, put.
ure, suffix2
Etymology: French -ure (in e.g. dasyure dasyure n.) and its etymon scientific Latin -urus (also -ura: see note) : ancient Greek οὐρά tail (see uro- comb. form2).
Scientific Latin -urus is found in genus names from 1758 (e.g. Trichiurus trichiure n. at trichiurid n. Derivatives) and -ura from 1764 (e.g. Xiphosura xiphosure n. at xiphosuran adj. and n. Derivatives).
Re
“with reference to,” used from c. 1700 in legalese, from Latin (in) re “in the matter of,” from ablative case of res “matter, thing.” Its use is execrated by Fowler in three different sections of “Modern English Usage.”
Ra
Ra or Re is the ancient Egyptian sun god. By the Fifth Dynasty in the 25th & 24th centuries, he had become a major god in ancient Egyptian religion, identified primarily with the noon sun.
re
word-forming element meaning “back to the original place; again, anew, once more,” also with a sense of “undoing,” c. 1200, from Old French and directly from Latin re- “again, back, anew, against,” “Latin combining form conceivably from Indo-European *wret-, metathetical variant of *wert- “to turn” [Watkins]. Often merely intensive, and in many of the older borrowings from French and Latin the precise sense of re- is lost in secondary senses or weakened beyond recognition. OED writes that it is “impossible to attempt a complete record of all the forms resulting from its use,” and adds that “The number of these is practically infinite ….” The Latin prefix became red- before vowels and h-, as in redact, redeem, redolent, redundant.

nature n.
late 13c., “restorative powers of the body, bodily processes; powers of growth;” from Old French nature “nature, being, principle of life; character, essence,” from Latin natura “course of things; natural character, constitution, quality; the universe,” literally “birth,” from natus “born,” past participle of nasci “to be born,” from PIE *gene- “to give birth, beget” (see genus).

Nature Greek: phusis – Strong’s No.:g5449
from phuo, “to bring forth, produce,” signifies
(a) “the nature” (i.e., the natural powers of constitution) of a person or thing, Eph 2:3; Jam 3:7 (“kind”); 2Pe 1:4;
(b) “origin, birth,” Rom 2:27, one who by birth is a Gentile, uncircumcised, in contrast to one who, though circumcised, has become spiritually uncircumcised by his iniquity; Gal 2:15;
(c) “the regular law or order of nature,” Rom 1:26, against “nature” (para, “against”); Rom 2:14, adverbially, “by nature” (for Rom 11:21, 24, see NATURAL, Note); 1Cr 11:14; Gal 4:8, “by nature (are no gods),” here “nature” is the emphatic word, and the phrase includes demons, men regarded as deified, and idols; these are gods only in name (the negative, me, denies not simply that they were gods, but the possibility that they could be).


evil adj.
Old English yfel (Kentish evel) “bad, vicious, ill, wicked,” from Proto-Germanic ubilaz (cognates: Old Saxon ubil, Old Frisian and Middle Dutch evel, Dutch euvel, Old High German ubil, German übel, Gothic ubils), from PIE *upelo-, from root *wap- “bad, evil” (cognates: Hittite huwapp- “evil”).

In Old English and other older Germanic languages other than Scandinavian, “this word is the most comprehensive adjectival expression of disapproval, dislike or disparagement” [OED]. Evil was the word the Anglo-Saxons used where we would use bad, cruel, unskillful, defective (adj.), or harm n., crime, misfortune, disease n.. In Middle English, bad took the wider range of senses and evil began to focus on moral badness. Both words have good as their opposite. Evil-favored (1520s) meant “ugly.” Evilchild is attested as an English surname from 13c.

The adverb is Old English yfele, originally of words or speech. Also as a noun in Old English,
“what is bad; sin, wickedness; anything that causes injury, morally or physically.”

Especially of a malady or disease from c. 1200. The meaning “extreme moral wickedness” was one of the senses of the Old English noun, but it did not become established as the main sense of the modern word until 18c. As a noun, Middle English also had evilty. Related: Evilly. Evil eye (Latin oculus malus) was Old English eage yfel. The jocular notion of an evil twin as an excuse for regrettable deeds is by 1986, American English, from an old motif in mythology.


god n.
Old English god “supreme being, deity; the Christian God; image of a god; godlike person,” from Proto-Germanic guthan (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Dutch god, Old High German got, German Gott, Old Norse guð, Gothic guþ), from PIE ghut– “that which is invoked” (cognates: Old Church Slavonic zovo “to call,” Sanskrit huta- “invoked,” an epithet of Indra), from root *gheu(e)- “to call, invoke.”

I want my lawyer, my tailor, my servants, even my wife to believe in God, because it means that I shall be cheated and robbed and cuckolded less often. … If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him. [Voltaire]

  1. Any person or thing exalted too much in estimation, or deified and honored as the chief good.

graven adj.
“sculpted, carved,” late 14c., past participle adjective from grave (v.) + -en (1).

Exodus 20:4 Kjb
Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth.


similitude n.
late 14c., from Old French similitude “similarity, relationship, comparison” (13c.) and directly from Latin similitudinem (nominative similitudo) “likeness, resemblance,” from similis “like” (see similar).
verisimilitude n.
“appearance of truth or reality, likelihood,” c. 1600, from French verisimilitude (1540s), from Latin verisimilitudo “likeness to truth,” from veri, genitive of verum, neuter of verus “true” (see very) + similis “like, similar” (see similar). Related: Verisimilar.

image n.
c. 1200, “piece of statuary; artificial representation that looks like a person or thing,” from Old French image “image, likeness; figure, drawing, portrait; reflection; statue,” earlier imagene (11c.), from Latin imaginem (nominative imago) “copy, imitation, likeness; statue, picture,” also “phantom, ghost, apparition,” figuratively “idea, appearance,” from stem of imitari “to copy, imitate” (see imitation).

To þe ymage of god he made hym [Gen. i:27, Wycliffite Bible, early version, 1382]

Meaning “reflection in a mirror” is early 14c. The mental sense was in Latin, and appears in English late 14c. Sense of “public impression” is attested in isolated cases from 1908 but not in common use until its rise in the jargon of advertising and public relations, c. 1958.


Deuteronomy 4:16 Kjb
Lest ye corrupt yourselves, and make you a graven image, the similitude of any figure, the likeness of male or female,


wizard of id


coincide v.
1705, “be identical in substance or nature,” but from 1640s as a verb in English in Latin form, “occupy the same space, agree in position,” from Medieval Latin coincidere (used in astrology), literally “to fall upon together,” from Latin com- “together” (see co-) + incidere “to fall upon” (in- “upon” + cadere “to fall;” see case (n.1)). From 1809 as “occur at the same time.” Related: Coincided; coinciding.
cide
word-forming element meaning “killer,” from French -cide, from Latin -cida “cutter, killer, slayer,” from -cidere, comb. form of caedere “to strike down, chop, beat, hew, fell, slay,” from PIE kae-id-, from root *(s)k(h)ai- “to strike” (Pokorny, not in Watkins; cognates: Sanskrit skhidati “beats, tears,” Lithuanian kaisti “shave,” German heien “beat”). For Latin vowel change, see acquisition. The element also can represent “killing,” from French –cide*, from Latin -cidium “a cutting, a killing.”


ism n.
“distinctive doctrine, theory, or practice,” 1670s, the suffix -ism used as an independent word, chiefly disparagingly. Related: Ismatical. By the same path, ist is from 1811.
ism
word-forming element making nouns implying a practice, system, doctrine, etc., from French -isme or directly from Latin -isma, -ismus (source also of Italian, Spanish -ismo, Dutch, German -ismus), from Greek -ismos, noun ending signifying the practice or teaching of a thing, from the stem of verbs in -izein, a verb-forming element denoting the doing of the noun or adjective to which it is attached. For distinction of use, see -ity. The related Greek suffix -isma(t)- affects some forms.


Confessions Of A Former Truther


Proverbs 20:17 Kjb
Bread of deceit is sweet to a man; but afterwards his mouth shall be filled with gravel.

2014 show 244 oct 29

It’s Halloween in Utah “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law”, Ave Maria, cut a cheque, kiss a Pope, pick a bale of cotton & a caller with a dim view of the “So called Bible”. Ok!

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Tonight’s topic among others: It’s Halloween in Utah and Clint forgets to Phone Daniel and Circumventing the 10 Commandments!


The Ten Commandments Exodus 20:2-17 Nkjv

1 I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. You shall have no other gods before Me.

2 You shall not make for yourself a carved image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth; you shall not bow down to them nor serve them. For I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children to the third and fourth generations of those who hate Me, but showing mercy to thousands, to those who love Me and keep My Commandments.

3 You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain, for the Lord will not hold him guiltless who takes His name in vain.

4 Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. In it you shall do no work: you, nor your son, nor your daughter, nor your male servant, nor your female servant, nor your cattle, nor your stranger who is within your gates. For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and hallowed it.

5 Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be long upon the land which the Lord your God is giving you.

6 You shall not murder.

7 You shall not commit adultery.

8 You shall not steal.

9 You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.

10 You shall not covet your neighbor’s house; you shall not covet your neighbor’s wife, nor his male servant, nor his female servant, nor his ox, nor his donkey, nor anything that is your neighbor’s.”


Colossians 2:14 kjv
14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;


The Greeson-Zecca & Mastropalo Debate on What Law are We Under Today? .pdf

Paul confirmed Jesus’ fulfillment of the Law and it’s passing. Through Christ, Christians are “made alive together with Him, having forgiven you all trespasses, having wiped out the hand-writing of requirements that was against us,
which was contrary to us. And He has taken it out of the way, having nailed it to the cross …So let no one judge you in food or in drink, or regarding a festival or a new moon or Sabbaths, which are a shadow of things to come, but the substance is of “Christ” (Col. 2:13-17). The cross was the culmina-tion of Christ’s fulfillment of the Old Testament Law and prophets. By Christ’s death the Law was nailed to the cross and taken out of the way. The Law, including the Sabbath, is no longer binding…

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the LawAleister Crowley


pardon v.
mid-15c., “to forgive for offense or sin,” from Old French pardoner (see pardon n.).
I grant you pardon,’ said Louis XV to Charolais, who, to divert himself, had just killed a man; ‘but I also pardon whoever will kill you.’ [Marquis de Sade, “Philosophy in the Bedroom”]
Related: Pardoned; pardoning. Pardon my French as exclamation of apology for obscene language is from 1895.

pardon n.
late 13c., “papal indulgence,” from Old French pardon, from pardoner “to grant; forgive” (11c., Modern French pardonner), “to grant, forgive,” from Vulgar Latin perdonare “to give wholeheartedly, to remit,” from Latin per- “through, thoroughly” (see per) + donare “give, present” (see donation).
Meaning “passing over an offense without punishment” is from c. 1300, also in the strictly ecclesiastical sense; sense of “pardon for a civil or criminal offense; release from penalty or obligation” is from late 14c. earlier in Anglo-French. Weaker sense of “excuse for a minor fault” is attested from 1540s.


Romans 12:17 Kjv.
17 Recompense to no man evil for evil. Provide things honest in the sight of all men.


keeper n.
c. 1300 (late 13c. as a surname), “one who has charge of some person or thing, warden,” agent noun from keep v.. Sense of “one who carries on some business” is from mid-15c. Sporting sense (originally cricket) is from 1744. Meaning “something (or someone) worth keeping” is attested by 1999. Brother’s keeper is from Genesis iv:9.

peace n.
mid-12c., “freedom from civil disorder,” from Anglo-French pes, Old French pais “peace, reconciliation, silence, permission” (11c., Modern French paix), from Latin pacem (nominative pax) “compact, agreement, treaty of peace, tranquility, absence of war” (source of Provençal patz, Spanish paz, Italian pace), from PIE pag-/pak- “fasten,” related to pacisci “to covenant or agree” (see pact).

peace-keeping n.
also peacekeeping, 1961 in the international sense, from peace + keeping, verbal noun from keep v.. Earlier “preservation of law and order” (mid-15c.). Related: Peace-keeper (1570s).

keep v.
late Old English cepan “to seize, hold,” also “to observe,” from Proto-Germanic kopijan, but with no certain connection to other languages. It possibly is related to Old English capian “to look,” from Proto-Germanic kap- (cepan was used c. 1000 to render Latin observare), which would make the basic sense “to keep an eye on.”


Noon Rest From Work - After Millet
Noon: Rest From Work (After Millet). Gogh, Vincent van. Oil on canvas. 73.0 x 91.0 cm.

rest v.
“sleep,” Old English ræste, reste “rest, bed, intermission of labor, mental peace,” common Germanic (Old Saxon resta “resting place, burial-place,” Dutch rust, Old High German rasta, German Rast “rest, peace, repose”), of uncertain origin.
rest v.
“remainder, that which is left after a separation,” early 15c., from Middle French reste “remnant,” from rester “to remain” (see rest (v.2)). Meaning “others, those not included in a proposition” is from 1530s.


Re
“with reference to,” used from c. 1700 in legalese, from Latin (in) re “in the matter of,” from ablative case of res “matter, thing.” Its use is execrated by Fowler in three different sections of “Modern English Usage.”
Ra
Ra or Re is the ancient Egyptian sun god. By the Fifth Dynasty in the 25th & 24th centuries, he had become a major god in ancient Egyptian religion, identified primarily with the noon sun.
re
word-forming element meaning “back to the original place; again, anew, once more,” also with a sense of “undoing,” c. 1200, from Old French and directly from Latin re- “again, back, anew, against,” “Latin combining form conceivably from Indo-European wret-, metathetical variant of wert- “to turn” [Watkins]. Often merely intensive, and in many of the older borrowings from French and Latin the precise sense of re- is lost in secondary senses or weakened beyond recognition. OED writes that it is “impossible to attempt a complete record of all the forms resulting from its use,” and adds that “The number of these is practically infinite ….” The Latin prefix became red- before vowels and h-, as in redact, redeem, redolent, redundant.
pre
word-forming element meaning “before,” from Old French pre- and Medieval Latin pre-, both from Latin prae (adverb and preposition) “before in time or place,” from PIE peri- (cognates: Oscan prai, Umbrian pre, Sanskrit pare “thereupon,” Greek parai “at,” Gaulish are- “at, before,” Lithuanian pre “at,” Old Church Slavonic pri “at,” Gothic faura, Old English fore “before”), extended form of root per- (1) “beyond” (see per).

The Latin word was active in forming verbs. Also see prae-. Sometimes in Middle English muddled with words in pro- or per-.

press n.
c. 1300, presse, “crowd, throng, company; crowding and jostling of a throng; a massing together,” from Old French presse n. “throng, crush, crowd; wine or cheese press” (11c.), from Latin pressare (see press (v.1)). Late Old English had press “clothes press.”
press v.
“force into service,” 1570s, alteration (by association with press (v.1)) of prest (mid-14c.) “engage by loan, pay in advance,”
press v.
“push against,” early 14c., “to clasp, embrace;” mid-14c. “to squeeze out;” also “to cluster, gather in a crowd;” late 14c., “to press against, exert pressure,” also “assault, assail;” also “forge ahead, push one’s way, move forward,”
giant n.
c. 1300, “fabulous man-like creature of enormous size,” from Old French geant, earlier jaiant “giant, ogre” (12c.), from Vulgar Latin gagantem (nominative gagas), from Latin gigas “a giant,” from Greek Gigas (usually in plural, Gigantes), one of a race of divine but savage and monstrous beings (personifying destructive natural forces), sons of Gaia and Uranus, eventually destroyed by the gods. The word is of unknown origin, probably from a pre-Greek language. Derivation from gegenes “earth-born” is considered untenable.
Ent
*Dauid eóde to ánwíge ongeán ðone ent Goliam
David went in single combat against the giant Goliath,
ent, n.
late Latin ens, entis: see ens n. metaphor. rare.
ent
word-forming element making adjectives from nouns or verbs, from French -ent and directly from Latin -entem (nominative -ens), present participle ending of verbs in -ere/-ire. Old French changed it in many words to -ant, but after c. 1500 some of these in English were changed back to what was supposed to be correct Latin. See -ant.
cent n.
late 14c., from Latin centum “hundred” (see hundred). Middle English meaning was “one hundred,” but it shifted 17c. to “hundredth part” under influence of percent. Chosen in this sense in 1786 as a name for a U.S. currency unit by Continental Congress. The word first was suggested by Robert Morris in 1782 under a different currency plan. Before the cent, Revolutionary and colonial dollars were reckoned in ninetieths, based on the exchange rate of Pennsylvania money and Spanish coin.

represent v.
late 14c., “to bring to mind by description,” also “to symbolize, serve as a sign or symbol of; serve as the type or embodiment of;” from Old French representer “present, show, portray” (12c.), from Latin repraesentare “make present, set in view, show, exhibit, display,” from re-, intensive prefix (see re-), + praesentare “to present,” literally “to place before” (see present v.). Legislative sense is attested from 1650s. Related: Represented; representing.
representative adj.
“serving to represent,” late 14c., from Old French representatif (early 14c.), from Medieval Latin repraesentativus, from stem of Latin repraesentare (see represent). Meaning “standing for others” is from 1620s; in the political sense of “holding the place of the people in the government, having citizens represented by chosen persons” is first recorded 1620s. Meaning “pertaining to or founded on representation of the people” is from 1640s.
representation n.
c. 1400, “image, likeness,” from Old French representacion (14c.) and directly from Latin representationem (nominative representatio), noun of action from past participle stem of repraesentare (see represent). Meaning “statement made in regard to some matter” is from 1670s. Legislative sense first attested 1769.


The Return of the Prodigal Son
The Return of the Prodigal Son. 262 cm × 205 cm. Rembrandt van Rijn. Oil. 1661–1669

lie n.
“an untruth,” Old English lyge “lie, falsehood,” from Proto-Germanic lugiz (cognates: Old Norse lygi, Danish løgn, Old Frisian leyne (fem.), Dutch leugen (fem.), Old High German lugi, German Lüge, Gothic liugn “a lie”), from the root of lie (v.1). To give the lie to “accuse directly of lying” is attested from 1590s. Lie-detector first recorded 1909.

lier n.
“one who reclines;” 1580s, agent noun from lie (v.2).


ran
past tense of run v., Old English ran.
dom
abstract suffix of state, from Old English dom “statute, judgment” (see doom n.). Already active as a suffix in Old English (as in freodom, wisdom). Cognate with German -tum (Old High German tuom).


De facto : In fact, in deed, actually.
This phrase is used to characterize an officer, a govern­ment, a past action, or a state of affairs which must be accepted for all practical purposes, but is illegal or illegitimate.
Thus, an office, position or status exist­ing under a claim or color of right such as a de facto corporation. In this sense it is the contrary of de jure, which means rightful, legitimate, just, or consti­tutional.
Thus, an officer, king, or government de facto is one who is in actual possession of the office or supreme power, but by usurpation, or without lawful title; while an officer, king, or governor de jure is one who has just claim and rightful title to the office or power, but has never had plenary possession of it, or is not in actual possession.
MacLeod v. United States, 229 U.S. 4 1 6, 33 S.Ct. 955, 57 L.Ed.1260.
Blacks Law 4th edition P:375


prodigal adj.
mid-15c., a back-formation from prodigality, or else from Middle French prodigal and directly from Late Latin prodigalis, from Latin prodigus “wasteful,” from prodigere “drive away, waste,” from pro- “forth” (see pro-) + agere “to drive” (see act v.). First reference is to prodigial son, from Vulgate Latin filius prodigus (Luke xv:11-32). As a noun, “prodigal person,” 1590s, from the adjective (the Latin adjective also was used as a noun).

driver n.
“one who drives” in various senses, c. 1400; agent noun from drive v.. Slavery sense is attested by 1796. Driver’s seat is attested by 1867; figurative use by 1954.
2. The person who drives beasts.


design v.
1540s, from Latin designare “mark out, devise, choose, designate, appoint,” from de- “out” (see de-) + signare “to mark,” from signum “a mark, sign” (see sign n.). Originally in English with the meaning now attached to designate; many modern uses of design are metaphoric extensions. Related: Designed; designing.


licence n.
mid-14c., “liberty (to do something), leave,” from Old French licence “freedom, liberty, power, possibility; permission,” (12c.), from Latin licentia “freedom, liberty, license,” from licentem (nominative licens), present participle of licere “to be allowed, be lawful,” from PIE root leik- “to offer, bargain” (cognates: Lettish likstu “I come to terms”). Meaning “formal (usually written) permission from authority to do something” (marry, hunt, drive, etc.) is first attested early 15c. Meaning “excessive liberty, disregard of propriety” is from mid-15c. There have been attempts to confine license to verbal use and licence to noun use (compare advise/advice, devise/device.

licence v.
c. 1400, “grant formal authorization,” from license n.. Related: Licenced; Licencing.

certificate n.
early 15c., “action of certifying,” from French certificat, from Medieval Latin certificatum “thing certified,” noun use of neuter past participle of certificare (see certify). Of documents, from mid-15c., especially a document which attests to someone’s authorization to practice or do something (1540s).


colon n.
“large intestine,” late 14c., from Latinized form of Greek kolon (with a short initial -o-) “large intestine,” which is of unknown origin.

colony n.
late 14c., “ancient Roman settlement outside Italy,” from Latin colonia “settled land, farm, landed estate,” from colonus “husbandman, tenant farmer, settler in new land,” from colere “to inhabit, cultivate, frequent, practice, tend, guard, respect,” from PIE root kwel- (1) “move around” (source of Latin -cola “inhabitant;” see cycle n.). Also used by the Romans to translate Greek apoikia “people from home.” Modern application dates from 1540s.


auto
word-forming element meaning “self, one’s own, by oneself,” from Greek auto- “self, one’s own,” combining form of autos “self, same,” which is of unknown origin. Before a vowel, aut-; before an aspirate, auth-. In Greek also used as a prefix to proper names, as in automelinna “Melinna herself.” The opposite prefix would be allo-.
graph
modern word-forming element meaning “instrument for recording; that which writes, marks, or describes; something written,” from Greek -graphos “-writing, -writer” (as in autographos “written with one’s own hand”), from graphe “writing, the art of writing, a writing,” from graphein “to write, express by written characters,” earlier “to draw, represent by lines drawn” (see -graphy). Adopted widely (Dutch -graaf, German -graph, French -graphe, Spanish -grafo). Related: -grapher; -graphic; -graphical.


signature n.
1530s, a kind of document in Scottish law, from Middle French signature (16c.) or directly from Medieval Latin signatura “signature, a rescript,” in classical Latin “the matrix of a seal,” from signatus, past participle of signare “to mark with a stamp, sign” (see sign v.).
Meaning “one’s own name written in one’s own hand” is from 1570s, replacing sign-manual (early 15c.) in this sense. Musical sense of “signs placed it the beginning of a staff to indicate the key and rhythm” is from 1806. Meaning “a distinguishing mark of any kind” is from 1620s
SIG,
a Saxon word signifying victory. is used in names, as in Sigbert, bright victory. In answers to the Greek vix in Nicander, and the Latin vic, in Victorinus.
nay
word of negation, late 12c., from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse nei, compound of ne “not” (see un-) + ei “ever” (see aye (2)).
, ; adv.No, not; non.
Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional na,
na, conj. Forms: Sc. pre-17 nai, pre-17 nay, pre-17 17– na; Eng. regional (north-west.) 19– na. Etymology : Perhaps formed within English, by compounding. Etymons: English na , no conj.1
tau (Τ τ) :
nineteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, from Hebrew taw, last letter of the Hebrew alphabet, literally “sign, mark.”
In ancient times, Tau was used as a symbol for life and/or resurrection, whereas the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, theta, was considered the symbol of death.
In Biblical times, the Taw was put on men to distinguish those who lamented sin, although newer versions of the Bible have replaced the ancient term “Taw” with “mark” (Ezekiel 9:4) or “signature” (Job 31:35).
ur, (n). An inarticulate sound, uttered instead of a word that the speaker is unable to remember or bring out.
úre gen. pl. of personal pronoun of first person. Of us Adam can yfel and gód, swá swá úre sum (quasi unus ex nobis ), Gen. 3, 22.
úre adj. pronoun. I. our
ure, n.1
Etymology: Anglo-Norman eure, = Old French uevre , euvre , evre (13th cent.; French œuvre ) Latin opera opera n.2
I. in ure:
a. In or into use, practice, or performance. Often with vbs., as bring, come, have, and esp. put (freq. c1510–1630). Also rarely with into.
b. With dependent infinitive.
c. With reference to statutes, etc.: In or into effect, force, or operation. Chiefly with vbs., esp. put.
d. In remembrance or recollection. Only to have..in ure.
e. In or into a state of prevalence or existence. Chiefly with vbs., as come, draw, put.
ure, suffix2
Etymology: French -ure (in e.g. dasyure dasyure n.) and its etymon scientific Latin -urus (also -ura: see note) : ancient Greek οὐρά tail (see uro- comb. form2).
Scientific Latin -urus is found in genus names from 1758 (e.g. Trichiurus trichiure n. at trichiurid n. Derivatives) and -ura from 1764 (e.g. Xiphosura xiphosure n. at xiphosuran adj. and n. Derivatives).
-re
nature n.
late 13c., “restorative powers of the body, bodily processes; powers of growth;” from Old French nature “nature, being, principle of life; character, essence,” from Latin natura “course of things; natural character, constitution, quality; the universe,” literally “birth,” from natus “born,” past participle of nasci “to be born,” from PIE gene- “to give birth, beget” (see genus).

1 Strong’s Number: g5449 Greek: phusis – Nature:
from phuo, “to bring forth, produce,” signifies
(a) “the nature” (i.e., the natural powers of constitution) of a person or thing, Eph 2:3; Jam 3:7 (“kind”); 2Pe 1:4;
(b) “origin, birth,” Rom 2:27, one who by birth is a Gentile, uncircumcised, in contrast to one who, though circumcised, has become spiritually uncircumcised by his iniquity; Gal 2:15;
(c) “the regular law or order of nature,” Rom 1:26, against “nature” (para, “against”); Rom 2:14, adverbially, “by nature” (for Rom 11:21, 24, see NATURAL, Note); 1Cr 11:14; Gal 4:8, “by nature (are no gods),” here “nature” is the emphatic word, and the phrase includes demons, men regarded as deified, and idols; these are gods only in name (the negative, me, denies not simply that they were gods, but the possibility that they could be).