2014 show 211 sept 10

“Welcome to the show Canada”

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Tonight’s topic among others: “Welcome to the show Canada” and Should a Slave understand the Language of his Master? Should a Citizen not know the Language of Citizenship? and the detractor email and;

citizenship (n.)
“status, rights, privileges, and responsibilities of a citizen,” 1610s, from citizen + -ship.

slave (n.)
late 13c., “person who is the chattel or property of another,” from Old French esclave (13c.), from Medieval Latin Sclavus “slave” (source also of Italian schiavo, French esclave, Spanish esclavo), originally “Slav” (see Slav); so used in this secondary sense because of the many Slavs sold into slavery by conquering peoples.

This sense development arose in the consequence of the wars waged by Otto the Great and his successors against the Slavs, a great number of whom they took captive and sold into slavery. [Klein]

Meaning “one who has lost the power of resistance to some habit or vice” is from 1550s. Applied to devices from 1904, especially those which are controlled by others (compare slave jib in sailing, similarly of locomotives, flash bulbs, amplifiers). Slave-driver is attested from 1807; extended sense of “cruel or exacting task-master” is by 1854. Slave state in U.S. history is from 1812. Slave-trade is attested from 1734.
Old English Wealh “Briton” also began to be used in the sense of “serf, slave” c.850; and Sanskrit dasa-, which can mean “slave,” apparently is connected to dasyu- “pre-Aryan inhabitant of India.” Grose’s dictionary (1785) has under Negroe “A black-a-moor; figuratively used for a slave,” without regard to race. More common Old English words for slave were þeow (related to þeowian “to serve”) and þræl (see thrall). The Slavic words for “slave” (Russian rab, Serbo-Croatian rob, Old Church Slavonic rabu) are from Old Slavic *orbu, from the PIE root *orbh- (also source of orphan), the ground sense of which seems to be “thing that changes allegiance” (in the case of the slave, from himself to his master). The Slavic word is also the source of robot.


finance (v.)
late 15c., “to ransom” (obsolete), from finance (n.). Sense of “to manage money” is recorded from 1827; that of “to furnish with money” is from 1866. Related: Financed; financing.
finance (n.)
c. 1400, “an end, settlement, retribution,” from Old French finance “end, ending; pardon, remission; payment, expense; settlement of a debt” (13c.), noun of action from finer “to end, settle a dispute or debt,” from fin (see fine (n.)). Compare Medieval Latin finis “a payment in settlement, fine or tax.”

The notion is of “ending” (by satisfying) something that is due (compare Greek telos “end;” plural tele “services due, dues exacted by the state, financial means”). The French senses gradually were brought into English: “ransom” (mid-15c.), “taxation” (late 15c.); the sense of “management of money, science of monetary business” first recorded in English 1770.