2015 show 295 jan 21

The Shmita! The Jew Bile Epsilon, the moon of blood and a self-fulfilling prophecy

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Tonight’s topic among others: The Shmita! which can predict all financial collapses! and; God is responsible for Shmita’s which are a Seven year cycle! How can Empires Crashing be Predicted and; Shmita is also known as the Release or the Collapse! and; 1929 happened on the day of the Shmita and WWI happened on the Year of the Shmita and WWII happened on the Seven year cycle of the Shmita and 2001, Was the end of Towers, or Shakings.. in the middle of the 49 Year Period or Jubilee and Seven Years later another Jubiliee.. the Financial Crisis of 2008 and; The Jubilee ends in September 2015, is this the Financial Collapse?
Shmita – Wikipedia


self-fulfilling prophecy
Any positive or negative expectation about circumstances, events, or people that may affect a person’s behavior toward them in a manner that causes those expectations to be fulfilled.
becoming real or true by virtue of having been predicted or expected self–fulfilling prophecy


888
In Christian numerology, the number 888 represents Jesus, or sometimes more specifically Christ the Redeemer.
888 (number) – Wikipedia


Revelation 3:9 Kjv
Behold, I will make them of the synagogue of Satan, which say they are Jews, and are not, but do lie; behold, I will make them to come and worship before thy feet, and to know that I have loved thee.


https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/offering_by_lund.jpg


jubilee n.
late 14c., in the Old Testament sense, from Old French jubileu “jubille; anniversary; rejoicing,” from Late Latin iubilaeus “the jubilee year,” originally an adjective, “of the jubilee,” altered (by association with Latin iubilare “to shout with joy”) from Greek iabelaios, from iobelos, from Hebrew yobhel “jubilee,” formerly “a trumpet, ram’s horn,” literally “ram.”

The original notion was of a year of emancipation of slaves and restoration of lands, to be celebrated every 50th year (Levit. xxv:9); it was proclaimed by the sounding of a ram’s horn on the Day of Atonement. The Catholic Church sense of “a period for remission of sin penalties in exchange for pilgrimages, alms, etc.” was begun in 1300 by Boniface VIII. The general sense of “season of rejoicing” is first recorded mid-15c., though through early 20c. the word kept its specific association with 50th anniversaries. As a type of African-American folk song, it is attested from 1872.

Leviticus 25:9 Kjv
Then shalt thou cause the trumpet of the jubile to sound on the tenth day of the seventh month, in the day of atonement shall ye make the trumpet sound throughout all your land.

Jew n. v.
a. A person of Hebrew descent; one whose religion is Judaism; an Israelite.
To cheat or overreach, in the way attributed to Jewish traders or usurers. Also, to drive a hard bargain, and intr., to haggle. Phr. to jew down, to beat down in price; also transf.These uses are now considered to be offensive.
bile n.
1660s, from French bile (17c.) “bile,” also, informally, “anger,” from Latin bilis “fluid secreted by the liver,” also one of the four humors (also known as choler), thus “anger, peevishness” (especially as black bile, 1797).
Epsilon
is the fifth letter of the Greek alphabet, corresponding phonetically to a close-mid front unrounded vowel /e/. In the system of Greek numerals it has the value five. It was derived from the Phoenician letter He
In Judaism
He is often used to represent the name of God, as He stands for Hashem, which means The Name and is a way of saying God without actually saying the name of God.


Joel 2:31 Kjv
The sun shall be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, before the great and terrible day of the Lord come.


https://christianremedyinlaw.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/blood-moon.jpg?w=840


city n.
early 13c., in medieval usage a cathedral town, but originally “any settlement,” regardless of size (distinction from town is 14c., though in English it always seems to have ranked above borough), from Old French cite “town, city” (10c., Modern French cité), from earlier citet, from Latin civitatem (nominative civitas; in Late Latin sometimes citatem) originally “citizenship, condition or rights of a citizen, membership in the community,” later “community of citizens, state, commonwealth” (used, for instance of the Gaulish tribes), from civis “townsman,” from PIE root *kei- “to lie; bed, couch; homestead; beloved, dear” (see cemetery).

The sense has been transferred from the inhabitants to the place. The Latin word for “city” was urbs, but a resident was civis. Civitas seems to have replaced urbs as Rome (the ultimate urbs) lost its prestige. Loss of Latin -v- is regular in French in some situations (compare alleger from alleviare; neige from nivea; jeune from juvenis. A different sound evolution from the Latin word yielded Italian citta, Catalan ciutat, Spanish ciudad, Portuguese cidade.

Replaced Old English burh (see borough). London is the city from 1550s. As an adjective from c. 1300. City hall first recorded 1670s to fight city hall is 1913, American English; city slicker first recorded 1916 (see slick); both American English. City limits is from 1825. The newspaper city desk attested from 1878. Inner city first attested 1968. City state (also city-state) is attested from 1877.


Leviticus 25 Kjv
23 The land shall not be sold for ever: for the land is mine, for ye are strangers and sojourners with me.
28 But if he be not able to restore it to him, then that which is sold shall remain in the hand of him that hath bought it until the year of jubile: and in the jubile it shall go out, and he shall return unto his possession.


gentile n.
“one who is not a Jew,” c. 1400; earlier “one who is not a Christian, a pagan” (late 14c.), from Late Latin noun use of Latin gentilis “of the same family or clan, of or belonging to a Roman gens,” from gens (genitive gentis) “race, clan” (see genus, and compare gentle).

The Latin adjective also meant “of or belonging to the same nation,” hence, as a noun, gentiles (plural) might mean “men of family; persons belonging to the same family; fellow countrymen, kinsmen,” but also “foreigners, barbarians” (as opposed to Romans), those bound only by the Jus Gentium, the “law of nations,” defined as “the law that natural reason establishes among all mankind and is followed by all peoples alike.”

The Latin word then was used in the Vulgate to translate Greek ethnikos (see ethnic), from ta ethne “the nations,” which translated Hebrew ha goyim “the (non-Jewish) nations” (see goy). Hence in Late Latin, after the Christianization of Rome, gentilis also could mean “pagans, heathens,” as opposed to Christians. Based on Scripture, gentile also was used by Mormons (1847) and Shakers (1857) to refer to those not of their profession.
goy n.
“a gentile, a non-Jew” (plural goyim), 1835, from Hebrew goy “people, nation;” in Mishnaic and Modern Hebrew, also “gentile” (compare gentile). The fem. form of the Hebrew word entered Middle French as gouge “a wench” (15c.).

gentilitious adj.
1. Characteristic of a ‘gentile’; pagan. Obs.—1
2. Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of, a nation; national. (= gentilitial adj. 1.)
a. Of or pertaining to a gens or family. (= gentilitial adj. 2.)


Consideration n.
1. The act of considering; mental view; regard; notice.
2. Mature thought; serious deliberation
5. That which is considered; motive of action; influence; ground of conduct.
6. Reason; that which induces to a determination.
7. In law, the reason which moves a contracting party to enter into an agreement; the material cause of a contract; the price or motive of a stipulation. In all contracts, each party gives something in exchange for what he receives.


human adj. n.human, 17 yuman (nonstandard).
Chiefly fig. Designating a person who takes on the appearance or form, or who performs the function of a specified (esp. inanimate) thing; (also) designating a person who assumes the appearance, role, or abilities of a specified creature.
human adj.
mid-15c., humain, humaigne, “human,” from Old French humain, umain (adj.) “of or belonging to man” (12c.), from Latin humanus “of man, human,” also “humane, philanthropic, kind, gentle, polite; learned, refined, civilized.” This is in part from PIE *(dh)ghomon-, literally “earthling, earthly being,” as opposed to the gods (see homunculus). Compare Hebrew adam “man,” from adamah “ground.” Cognate with Old Lithuanian zmuo (accusative zmuni) “man, male person.”
Human interest is from 1824. Human rights attested by 1680s; human being by 1690s. Human relations is from 1916; human resources attested by 1907, American English, apparently originally among social Christians and based on natural resources.
homunculus n.
“tiny human being produced artificially,” 1650s, from Latin homunculus (plural homunculi), literally “little person,” with -culus, diminutive suffix, + homo (genitive hominis), which technically meant “male human,” but it also was used with a sense “the human race, mankind;” while in Vulgar Latin it could be used as “one, anyone, they, people” and in logical and scholastic writing as “a human being, person.” This is conjectured to be perhaps from PIE *(dh)ghomon-, literally “earthling,” from *dhghem- “earth” (see chthonic; also compare human). Other Latin diminutives from homo included homullus, homuncio.

Homunculus-alchemical-creation

2014 show 132 april 30

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Tonight’s topic among others: Daniel has problems calling in, intercourse and seduction; word of the day intercourse; and investigate every word and;


intercourse n. mid-15c., “communication to and fro,” (“In early use exclusively with reference to trade” [OED]), from Old French entrecors “exchange, commerce, communication” (12c., Modern French entrecours), from Late Latin intercursus “a running between, intervention,” in Medieval Latin “intercommunication,” from intercursus, past participle of intercurrere “to run between, intervene, mediate,” from Latin inter- “between” (see inter-) +currere “to run” (see current (adj.)).


seduction n. 1520s, from Middle French séduction, from Latin seductionem (nominative seductio), noun of action from past participle stem of seducere (see seduce). Originally with reference to actions or beliefs; sexual sense is from 1769, originally always with women as the objects. Earlier appearance of the word in Middle English with a sense “treason, treachery” probably is a confusion with sedition, which confusion also is found in Old French seducion “treason, betrayal.”


civil adj. late 14c., “relating to civil law or life; pertaining to the internal affairs of a state,” from Old French civil “civil, relating to civil law” (13c.) and directly from Latin civilis “relating to a citizen, relating to public life, befitting a citizen,” hence by extension “popular, affable, courteous;” alternative adjectival derivation of civis “townsman” (see city).


idiot n. early 14c., “person so mentally deficient as to be incapable of ordinary reasoning;” also in Middle English “simple man, uneducated person, layman” (late 14c.), from Old French idiote “uneducated or ignorant person” (12c.), from Latin idiota “ordinary person, layman; outsider,” in Late Latin “uneducated or ignorant person,” from Greek idiotes “layman, person lacking professional skill” (opposed to writer, soldier, skilled workman), literally “private person” (as opposed to one taking part in public affairs), used patronizingly for “ignorant person,” from idios “one’s own” (see idiom).


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plato’s_five_regimes#Timocracy

timocracy n. 1580s, from Middle French tymocracie, from Medieval Latin timocratia (13c.), from Greek timokratia, from time “honor, worth” (related to tiein “to place a value on, to honor,” from PIE *kwi-ma-, suffixed form of root *kweie- (1) “to value, honor”) + -kratia “rule” (see -cracy). In Plato’s philosophy, a form of government in which ambition for honor and glory motivates the rulers (as in Sparta). In Aristotle, a form of government in which political power is in direct proportion to property ownership. Related: Timocratic; timocratical.